Likes Likes:  23
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
ELITE ELITE:  2
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 25 of 25

Thread: WMATA Metro Rail Bike Policy

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,420
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by fongfong View Post
    I'd be interested in the biggest critics explaining exactly what is wrong with the BART policy.
    I've ridden BART. It is in no way comparable to rush hour on metro.

    It smacks me as elitism to take the position that others cannot be held to that same standard of using their best judgment in this regard.
    I don't really give a crap about letting people use their judgment if the consequences affect others more than themselves.

    But all of this was covered before...
    Last edited by mstone; 02-01-2016 at 05:56 PM.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Reston, VA
    Posts
    639
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I lived in New York for six years, where everything imaginable gets transported on the subway, any time, day or night...pets in carriers, bikes, furniture - you name it. And the subway is way more congested than the Metro. And it works, and everybody deals with it, and it's OK. Metro rules are dumb.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Alexandria (Groveton)
    Posts
    1,678
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The last time I took on my bikes on a Metro train was on a weekend. The train ended up being fairly crowded so I went to the very end. It was fine until I got to Gallery Place to transfer. Of course there was some broken train, track work, or something. So it was a 45 minute wait for the Red Line. So I did what I should have done all along, walked the hell out of the station and rode to my destination in Silver Spring. Not surprisingly, I made it there before Metro. I did get yelled at for using the escalator with my bike, but the elevator was broke, and damned if I was waiting 45 minutes to go anywhere.

    The only thing is that I think when it comes to Metro, it should be constructive criticisms offered with solutions. As much as they can suck, they have seemingly been making strides to improve with cyclist parking, repair stations, CABI access, etc. I want them to be praised for the good strives and given ideas on how to improve. Because I think if it's just criticism, they will toss it into the pile that's got to be taller than Mt. Everest by now.

  4. #24
    PotomacCyclist is offline I spend all day thinking about bikes and talking to people on the internet about them.
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Planet Earth
    Posts
    4,766
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vern View Post
    I lived in New York for six years, where everything imaginable gets transported on the subway, any time, day or night...pets in carriers, bikes, furniture - you name it. And the subway is way more congested than the Metro. And it works, and everybody deals with it, and it's OK. Metro rules are dumb.
    But NYC is only just starting to add bike racks on their buses. They are the last major U.S. city not to have bike racks on their buses. Some of the DC-area jurisdictions have had bus bike racks for a decade or more. Even Prince George's (which hasn't always been the most bike or transit-friendly) added bike racks to their regional buses last year.

    http://www.streetsblog.org/2015/08/3...arrows-bridge/

    The lack of bike racks on buses is a major omission in NYC, especially for the boroughs other than Manhattan where the subway coverage isn't as extensive.. Everything in NYC isn't always better. I never used bike racks on buses until this winter. Now that I've tried them out, I don't know why I didn't use them before. They make it a lot more convenient to travel longer distances in the DC region without having to bike the entire trip.

    There are various reasons for doing this: not wanting to be exhausted before even arriving at the destination (where someone might want to bike, instead of riding through areas with poorer bike infrastructure), being able to travel much farther without having to drive and still getting to ride the bike, traveling through areas with poor bike infrastructure but heading to bike-friendly destinations. Casual cyclists may want shorter overall bike trips. Or they may want to avoid certain hilly areas on the bike. If WMATA and the regional bus fleets didn't have bike racks on their buses, that would make traveling by bike much more difficult for many trips in the region. Or it would make some of those trips impractical with a bike. Bikeshare helps with some of those types of trips, but not all of them, since there are still many areas in the region that aren't part of CaBi. Some neighborhoods in participating jurisdictions don't have any bike stations or the bike stations are placed very far apart.
    Last edited by PotomacCyclist; 02-08-2016 at 08:36 PM.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,420
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PotomacCyclist View Post
    But NYC is only just starting to add bike racks on their buses. They are the last major U.S. city not to have bike racks on their buses
    Yes, I think their bike policy is more a reflection of the reality that they can't enforce any policy due to the uncontrolled nature of many stations than any kind of bike friendliness. The washington metro was designed differently as a specific reaction to some aspects of the NY system.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •