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Thread: Advice needed: Should I switch from 2X10 to 1X11 on a touring bike

  1. #51
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    So I'm busy specking out a new bike, and referred back to this thread thinking about drivetrains. The dilemma still exists.

    Because I'm a problem child, I want one bike that does everything. On my Vaya (now totaled, sadly) I had achieved near nirvana by swapping out the rear cassette to 11-36 with a long-cage 9-spd derailleur, and keeping the stock triple and Ultegra 10-spd shifters. It got me about 22 gear inches (feel free to check my math) on the low end, which was adequate for getting me up almost any hill even loaded. But I didn't lose the average range for commuting and roads.

    Now I'm trying to decide between an Ultegra 11-spd double or SRAM, as I'm not interested in Di2 or belt drive options. Triples are out of fashion (for good reason). The good news is, I'm working on the bike with Co-Motion who well understands the dilemma, and hopefully they can come up with good suggestions.

    Curious, has anyone built up a touring bike recently? Tell me about your drivetrain!

  2. #52
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    You don't want to hear about mine since I searched high and low for a triple that would take a 24T granny because I want a bike that can go fast and pull stumps.

  3. #53
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    I've yet to run out of gears on either of my 11-speed Ultegra bikes, but I have run out of gears on the 10-speed 105 gravel bike (although that may have been a function of the hill at Dirt Farm). I do feel like I can get a bit easier gearing on my bike with the triple using the small gear than with the doubles, but I haven't done the math to verify it. I'd have to look up the cassettes' teething since that's just not something I remember.

    Long/short is I do like the Ultegra 11-speed setup.

  4. #54
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    Old Boone which was doored was 1x Force - 40 Chainring, 11-28 in the back. 40/28 is racing gearing. Any steep hill required good sustained effort -- Walter Reed hill was really hard efforts on the Boone. First transmission change I put a 11-32 on the back and was decent, but not something I'd want to take up a long steep climb.

    New Diverge is 1x Force: 42 Chainring, 10-42 casette. 42-10 so far I've only been able to spin out on it on some extreme downhills. 42-42 is spin-too-much-to-win for me; there'd no doubt I can get up any hill, but I'd probably fall over from poor balance instead. If you went with a 40, 10-42, you'd probably get real close to your 22 Gear Inches.

    The issue I have with using the 1x for long touring is missing a lot of the in-between gears. I seem to be stuck a lot in either a too-hard gear (Rule #5) or too easy, and have no other recourse other than to grind it out and deal with the sore knees later.

    --Pete

  5. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by ginacico View Post
    So I'm busy specking out a new bike, and referred back to this thread thinking about drivetrains. The dilemma still exists.

    Because I'm a problem child, I want one bike that does everything. On my Vaya (now totaled, sadly) I had achieved near nirvana by swapping out the rear cassette to 11-36 with a long-cage 9-spd derailleur, and keeping the stock triple and Ultegra 10-spd shifters. It got me about 22 gear inches (feel free to check my math) on the low end, which was adequate for getting me up almost any hill even loaded. But I didn't lose the average range for commuting and roads.

    Now I'm trying to decide between an Ultegra 11-spd double or SRAM, as I'm not interested in Di2 or belt drive options. Triples are out of fashion (for good reason). The good news is, I'm working on the bike with Co-Motion who well understands the dilemma, and hopefully they can come up with good suggestions.

    Curious, has anyone built up a touring bike recently? Tell me about your drivetrain!
    Last December, I upgraded my hybrid from 3x7 to 3x10, which costs me about $200. I had to learn what's compatible and what's not. The main site that I used is this one, which is posted by a member here, also Shimano site. If you buy incompatible parts, they may not work together and no amount of screw adjustment would make them work. The most troublesome parts are the front gears. You can't mix road shifters with MTB front derailleurs and vice versa. In the rear, you can mix them with an exception for Shimano Dynasys, which is a different animal. With that said, here is what I recommend:

    Your former bike: Salsa Vaya Travel, size: 54 cm, Front crankset: 30/42/52, Cassette: 11-36.

    Your requirements:

    - Dropbar shifters.
    - Disk brakes.
    - Front crankset: 30/52
    - Rear: 11-36
    - Gear inches: 21.14(Based on wheel size 700x23 with Gatorskin tire, or 25.36" Total wheel diameter)

    I couldn't find a road front derailleur that supports 30/52 gears(22 Tooth difference), only 30/50, or 32/52(20 tooth difference max), but the rear derailleur supports 11-42, so you get even wider ratio if you want. However, my recommendation is to get a bike with 2x11 speed with 34/50 or 36/52 on the front, so the only thing you need to do is change the rear derailleur and cassette. This recommendation is based on the fact that you can use MTB rear derailleurs(except Dynasys) with road shifters.

    Rear Derailleur: RD-M8000-SGS
    Make sure that you select the "Long cage" option.
    Minimum rear sprocket size: 11T
    Maximum rear sprocket size:
    40T(3x11-speed)
    42T(2x11-speed)
    46T(1x11-speed)
    This rear derailleur has a huge total capacity of 47T, so it can handle wide gear ratios in the front and rear. It also features sealed bearings.

    Where to get it:

    1 - REI: $80, and if you add 2 more full price drivetrain components, you get 10% off, and that's in addition to to the 10% back in store credit, or 19% total discount, so your total cost is $64.80. They usually ship the next day, and you get it in 3 days total. They don't have it in stores, unfortunately.

    https://www.rei.com/product/895589/s...lleur-11-speed

    2 - JensonUSA: $63:

    https://www.jensonusa.com/Shimano-XT...ear-Derailleur

    - Cassttee: Any 11 Speed silver cassette will do.

    Gear inches when using 52/36 in the front:
    11-40: 22.83"
    11-41: 22.27"
    11-42: 21.74"
    Gear inches when using 50/34 in the front:
    11-40: 21.56"
    11-41: 21.03"
    11-42: 20.53"

  6. #56
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    Rohloff with belt drive. Loads of range, smooth as butter. Also expensive as all get out. Iím thinking of going to a Rohloff at some point, because it has some great advantages, even for touring. The problem is finding a shifter solution for drop bars, since the stock shifter is designed for flat bars. There are several good aftermarket solutions, though. Chain drive is cheaper than belt drive, but whereís the fun in that? (Itís certainly not in lubing that chain every few days!)

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  8. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkel View Post
    Rohloff with belt drive. Loads of range, smooth as butter. Also expensive as all get out. I’m thinking of going to a Rohloff at some point, because it has some great advantages, even for touring. The problem is finding a shifter solution for drop bars, since the stock shifter is designed for flat bars. There are several good aftermarket solutions, though. Chain drive is cheaper than belt drive, but where’s the fun in that? (It’s certainly not in lubing that chain every few days!)
    If it's gear range you want, why not get a Pinion gearbox with a belt drive (which is what my 'bike that's sold as a touring bike but I use for most things' came with)? The P.18 has a wider range than a Rohloff hub, and the added weight is located in the bottom bracket rather than the rear hub which has its benefits. Co-Motion offers both as options, with a good solution for a drop bar shifter for either. Just don't mind the price...

    Of course - neither option is within the original requirements, so feel free to ignore us.

    Slightly more useful: I also have a 1x11 SRAM drivetrain on my "fun" bike - 40T up front, and 10-42T on the rear. Similar to what Pete noted, I sometimes find myself (especially on a steeper hill such as Tilden climbing out of RCP towards Van Ness/UDC but also sometimes on rolling terrain) struggling to get the right gear and missing having an interim option. Not sure how much of it is familiarity vs. the available range, but I don't have that problem with the 18-speed Pinion gearbox (with or without trailer/trailercycle attached).

  9. #58
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    To follow up on the cassettes, the two bikes with Ultegra 11 have 11-28 and 11-32, not that I've ever noticed the difference, probably because the one with less range has a compact crankset (50/34). The 10-speed 105 also has 11/28.

  10. #59
    DismalScientist is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
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    You know, if you just used shift levers, none of this would be a problem.

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  12. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by DismalScientist View Post
    You know, if you just used shift levers, none of this would be a problem.
    And if you rode a proper ordinary you could simply avoid all of this new-fangled "gear shifting".

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