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Thread: Your latest bike purchase?

  1. #1431
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    Quote Originally Posted by drevil View Post
    I'll jump on that thread if I have something to contribute, but for now, I'll say you don't need a 100mm wide bottom bracket shell if you aren't going to get a fat bike and have no plans to ever run >4" tires.

    As for boosting your Hope hubs, you might be able to if you have the right version: https://www.wolftoothcomponents.com/...ts/boostinator
    Wow, had no idea that existed. Yeah, I've got Hope Pro 2 Evo (40t) hubs, so I assume those are the version I would need! -- that's a nice option to be able to keep using my 29" wheels, then, until I'm able/can-afford to build some 27.5+ wheels.

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    New power commuter built up today! Sad to part with the old steel tank, but...

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    My old Trek 7500 finally gave out on Tuesday. The frame cracked after about 16,000 miles. Since I replaced the chain and cassette every 4-6 months, I wanted a belt drive bike. The 11 speed ones were too expensive, about $2k, so I bought a Priority Continuum Onyx. It has been interesting so far, very quiet and shifting is silky smooth thanks to the gearless Nuvinci hub. Anyone else ride with a belt instead of a chain?

  4. #1434
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zack View Post
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    My old Trek 7500 finally gave out on Tuesday. The frame cracked after about 16,000 miles. Since I replaced the chain and cassette every 4-6 months, I wanted a belt drive bike. The 11 speed ones were too expensive, about $2k, so I bought a Priority Continuum Onyx. It has been interesting so far, very quiet and shifting is silky smooth thanks to the gearless Nuvinci hub. Anyone else ride with a belt instead of a chain?
    I'd love to get a belt drive bike for commuting, but I'd want something with drop bars and road-ish geometry since my commute is relative long, with lots of space to ride fast. But such a bike seems difficult to find at the $1000 price point, at least as a complete bike. Building a Soma Wolverine or something would probably be the most realistic option.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zack View Post
    My old Trek 7500 finally gave out on Tuesday. The frame cracked after about 16,000 miles. Since I replaced the chain and cassette every 4-6 months, I wanted a belt drive bike. The 11 speed ones were too expensive, about $2k, so I bought a Priority Continuum Onyx. It has been interesting so far, very quiet and shifting is silky smooth thanks to the gearless Nuvinci hub. Anyone else ride with a belt instead of a chain?
    Yes - I've been riding belt drive bikes for a couple of years now. I had a Breezer Beltway 8+ that worked nicely (Alfine 8 IGH), but the external bearing eccentric bottom bracket eventually just drove me nuts (I think the combination of my weight and the trailercycle's loaded weight were just too much for it under sustained load), so I upgraded earlier this month to a bike with a Pinion gearbox.

    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelsDC View Post
    I'd love to get a belt drive bike for commuting, but I'd want something with drop bars and road-ish geometry since my commute is relative long, with lots of space to ride fast. But such a bike seems difficult to find at the $1000 price point, at least as a complete bike. Building a Soma Wolverine or something would probably be the most realistic option.
    Building a Wolverine would be the most realistic option to get what you want, but you're still going to end up well past the $1,000 price point You figure you'd need to spend $600-$700 on the frame and fork, $150 for the front and rear sprockets (assuming you have a crankset/rear wheel with an IGH that can accommodate the switch), $75 on the belt at a minimum, plus whatever parts you don't have lying around (you know - the bottom bracket, headset, etc.). Another route to take at that price point would be to get one of the single speed belt drive bikes (both Raleigh and Spot have drop bar models for around $1k), and convert it to an IGH yourself, which could save you a little bit of money.

    If you're looking for a project - you also could consider getting something like a Raleigh Cadent frame from Joe Bike (http://www.joe-bike.com/product/rale...meset-2709.htm). The frame/fork/headset/BB shell are $200, which helps make the $1k price point more achievable.

    In all of those cases - unless you're riding single speed - it'll take a bit of hunting to find shifters that play nicely with drop bars.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelsDC View Post
    I'd love to get a belt drive bike for commuting, but I'd want something with drop bars and road-ish geometry since my commute is relative long, with lots of space to ride fast. But such a bike seems difficult to find at the $1000 price point, at least as a complete bike. Building a Soma Wolverine or something would probably be the most realistic option.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    This overran the $1000 price point by quite a bit. It's super nice for commuting, because there's barely anything to do to maintain the bike regardless of the riding conditions. The only thing I do with any frequency is pump up the tires. That said, it's not as dialed in as a geared bike if you're looking for a hammerfest on the way to work: you have to be a little more cautious about shifting, at least on the Alfine hub (I think the rider these hubs are marketed to has a slightly less agressive riding style than some on this forum!). I went with 8 speeds, and it's all I need for the commute, but I imagine many would prefer 11 speeds. Also, shifter options are extremely limited for drop bar bikes in IGH territory: I had to get the aftermarket Jtek bar end shifter, which works great, but may be a bit old school for some riders.

    tl:dr Highly recommended for commuting, but not exactly a cheap build.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dkel View Post
    you have to be a little more cautious about shifting, at least on the Alfine hub (I think the rider these hubs are marketed to has a slightly less agressive riding style than some on this forum!).
    I 100% agree with this.

    I have a Raleigh Misceo 4 with a belt drive and an Alfine 11 speed. The bike and belt are fantastic, routine maintenance on the bike solely requires putting air in the tires. The IGH is... less than fantastic. Granted, I am probably a more aggressive rider than what Shimano probably had in mind. I have had the bike for three and a half years and have just under 10,000 miles on it. The hub has needed servicing three times (it is currently at Bikenetic getting serviced as we speak, they are great at getting it to run smoothly again). I would love to replace it with something a bit more reliable and smooth. But... $$$

  8. #1438
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sunyata View Post
    I 100% agree with this.

    I have a Raleigh Misceo 4 with a belt drive and an Alfine 11 speed. The bike and belt are fantastic, routine maintenance on the bike solely requires putting air in the tires. The IGH is... less than fantastic. Granted, I am probably a more aggressive rider than what Shimano probably had in mind. I have had the bike for three and a half years and have just under 10,000 miles on it. The hub has needed servicing three times (it is currently at Bikenetic getting serviced as we speak, they are great at getting it to run smoothly again). I would love to replace it with something a bit more reliable and smooth. But... $$$
    To be fair, though, even the pricey options like Rohloff are not maintenance free. I only have one data point from a bigger and harder rider than I am, but this hub had similar maintenance/rebuild schedule to what you are describing and this was really expensive maintenance (IIRC $300-500 to rebuild?). Ultimately the Rohloff broke his Titus Racer X frame so that was the end of that experiment. He has never considered an IGH again for the MTB. But I can see the appeal for commuting, esp with the belt drive. I'd consider Alfine 11 with Di2 if it was lighter and performed better.

    Now that we've got brakes and hub spacing sorted for the drop-bar bikes, it does seem like a drivetrain evolution is overdue.

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    I'm told Rohloff shifting is indexed inside the hub rather than at the shifter, and supposedly that makes for a much better shifting experience than the Shimano options (I've also heard Di2 is helpful in the Shimano offerings). Those Rohloff hubs are prohibitively expensive, though—practically the cost of my entire build for that hub by itself. For commuting, I'd say Rohloff is overkill, based on price alone. Alfine is a good choice if you're carrying a decent amount of stuff for work, but I would recommend the Sturmey 2-speed "kick shift" for traveling light: bike configuration is like SS, but you get a climbing gear in addition. (To be fair, it suffers from its own operation quirks, though, like seemingly every other IGH option!)

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    Quote Originally Posted by hozn View Post
    To be fair, though, even the pricey options like Rohloff are not maintenance free. I only have one data point from a bigger and harder rider than I am, but this hub had similar maintenance/rebuild schedule to what you are describing and this was really expensive maintenance (IIRC $300-500 to rebuild?). Ultimately the Rohloff broke his Titus Racer X frame so that was the end of that experiment. He has never considered an IGH again for the MTB. But I can see the appeal for commuting, esp with the belt drive. I'd consider Alfine 11 with Di2 if it was lighter and performed better.

    Now that we've got brakes and hub spacing sorted for the drop-bar bikes, it does seem like a drivetrain evolution is overdue.
    FWIW - when I was buying my Breezer Beltway (previous bike), I was torn between the Alfine 8 and 11. At the time, the Alfine 11 had some sealing issues (i.e., the hub wouldn't necessarily stay sealed properly and you'd have minor oil leakage), which could be an issue or at least obnoxious to deal with, but I from what I've seen, that's gotten better. On the flip side - the Alfine 8 is much more annoying/labor intensive to perform its regular service (since you have to take the hub out of the wheel to give it a bath as opposed to having a service port). Having serviced my Alfine 8, I can honestly say that I'm shocked those gears withstood what I asked it to do.

    And I agree that the pricey options are not maintenance free, nor hassle free, but the hope is that they are more durable relative to the cheaper IGH options. But all have their own little quirks. For Rohloff, for example: Soma had to tweak the Wolverine design to be able to withstand the load the hub can place on the dropouts (so the v.1 frames may not be able to cope and are not officially approved). Besides, in general it's safe to say that the more expensive the thing is that breaks, the more expensive it'll be to fix. (Says the person who just bought a bike with a Pinion gearbox. Here's hoping I don't need to worry about making a claim against the 5 year warranty...)

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