Likes Likes:  49
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
ELITE ELITE:  6
Page 2 of 11 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 101

Thread: Next Bike -- What Do I Want?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Leesburg, VA
    Posts
    1,431
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GuyContinental View Post
    I'll echo what Hozn said (I attempt to keep up with him on my CX in LFP often well before dawn) and add that there isn't a single commonly-ridden MTB trail in the immediate DC area that can't be ridden well on a CX.
    Probably true of some of the easier stuff, but I wouldn't take a CX bike on any of the intermediate trail in the area, and wouldn't even consider it on the more advanced stuff. Most of wakefield would be alright, for example (though the rocky stuff on phase 4 would suck on a cross bike). I wouldn't ride Accotink on a cross bike though.

    To me, its a question of enjoyment. Sure, you can ride a CX bike on singletrack. I've done it many times. Its not very fun though. The geometry is unpleasant on actual trail, the ride is harsh, drop bars suck off road, ground clearance is bad, cross tires lack traction on steep climbs/descents and cornering etc.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Rosslyn, VA
    Posts
    1,305
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I just bought a cross bike at the end of 2012 with the explicit idea of wanting a more rugged and yet comfortable bike for winter riding. Before I decided on the cross bike I tried a number of MTN bikes and hybrids but never felt right with flat bars. I have always ridden drops and have no intention of doing any MTN riding so a cross bike made sense. Next I wanted to find a bike that would accept fenders, racks, a wide selection of tires, and would fit my budget which was no more than $1200.00. After much searching I decided on a 2012 Cannondale Caadx6 and have loved it. I am actually riding it most of the time now and find reasons to ride it more than my road bike (eg. looks like rain, back-pack is heavy today, I'm a wuss, etc). My only complaint if I had one is something Hozn mentioned. I couldn't afford to go one step up and get disk brakes, instead I have the dreaded cantilevers, but they suffice for now and the bike is so well equipped I can always upgrade later.


    Meet Ollie

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Posts
    800
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dickie View Post
    I couldn't afford to go one step up and get disk brakes, instead I have the dreaded cantilevers, but they suffice for now and the bike is so well equipped I can always upgrade later.
    Mmmm ... disk brakes. That was a requirement for me. My Masi has canti's and those things never seemed to stop. You can get mini-v's now for cross bikes which work great when set up right but nothing beats disk in my opinion. It will probably all boil down to how much you want to spend.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	IMG_0782.jpg 
Views:	190 
Size:	100.9 KB 
ID:	2656

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Portlandia!
    Posts
    1,537
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    http://allcitycycles.com/bikes/macho_man_disc

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	BK1324.jpg 
Views:	179 
Size:	47.5 KB 
ID:	2657

    You need one of these. I think a 49cm would be an excellent size for me... um... I mean you!

  5. #15
    DismalScientist is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Westover Beer Garden
    Posts
    2,647
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    BikeSnob says that fixies are out in London and the next big thing is ... Touring Bikes: http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/2013...oses-only.html

    I've ridden my touring bike on the C&O and easier parts of the CCT with no problems. You can run 28s for normal street riding or 35s or so for trails (not that I actually switched out the 28s). The major difference between cross and touring is likely to be geometry, with touring bikes being more relaxed and cross being more aggressive. One problem I have noticed on my latest touring bike is that the bottom bracket is too low for 175mm cranks and I bottom out easily. Cross bikes will have higher bottom brackets. Whether you want relaxed or aggressive geometry is a matter purely of your riding style and preference.

    As for bike suggestions, if looking for standard touring bikes with canti brakes, I personally would go to nashbar or bikedirect and avoid the LBS premium. Unfortunately, the discount internet dealers don't offer touring bikes with disc brakes, but I'm sure Bilsko and others would recommend a Disk Trucker.

    For cross bikes, the deal that Shawn pointed out on the Fuji at Performance/Fairfax looks really sweet even though the frame does not have rack and fender mounts.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Arlington
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I recently replaced my old commuter bike with a Specialized TriCross. It's perfect for commuting (e.g., has plenty of braze-ons for fenders, rack, etc). Mine is aluminum, disk brakes, okayish components (SRAM apex). Aside from commuting I've taken it lots on the C&O and parts of the CCT. Personally I wouldn't ride it on the CCT once you start getting north of Lake Fairfax, nor would I take it on dedicated mtb trails like Fountainhead and parts of Wakefield. OTOH I would not want to spend much time on a mtb on the C&O and certainly not as a commuter. So it's a tradeoff type deal. (Isn't it always?)

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Clarendon
    Posts
    803
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jabberwocky View Post
    Probably true of some of the easier stuff, but I wouldn't take a CX bike on any of the intermediate trail in the area, and wouldn't even consider it on the more advanced stuff. Most of wakefield would be alright, for example (though the rocky stuff on phase 4 would suck on a cross bike). I wouldn't ride Accotink on a cross bike though.

    To me, its a question of enjoyment. Sure, you can ride a CX bike on singletrack. I've done it many times. Its not very fun though. The geometry is unpleasant on actual trail, the ride is harsh, drop bars suck off road, ground clearance is bad, cross tires lack traction on steep climbs/descents and cornering etc.
    I'm kind of sick that way- I actually find the difficulty and discomfort part of the fun (I also telemark ski, unicycle, play underwater hockey and C-1 whitewater paddle so I'm definitely into masochism). BUT to the original point, she wasn't looking to ride intermediate trails, she was looking for a do-it-all ride that could also do some of the beginner trails. A CX is much better than a MTB for 90% or more of those.

  8. #18
    vvill's Avatar
    vvill is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Sydney AU
    Posts
    2,836
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Agreed with the general consensus here - unless you want to do mountain biking, a CX bike is fine for the C&O and many other offroad surfaces - especially if you go with lower pressure wider tires. I'd also add that depending on how much utility riding you might do, a touring style road bike (with clearance for wider tires, etc.) is also an option. It'll generally be heavier but also more sturdy for riding loaded, and possibly also more comfortable with the more upright position, longer wheelbase, etc. CX bikes are generally designed to go fast on off-road surfaces, but not necessarily comfortably. Obviously this all depends a lot on how you set your bike up. Touring/utility road bikes may also have even wider tire clearances than CX bikes, for say, wider studded tires or more balloon-y tires if you want, where CX bikes are often limited to 35mm or so. It depends on the bike though; some are made so specifically for the niche of racing CX that they don't even have water bottle mounts, while many are marketed as double-duty commuter/light offroad bikes and come stock with urban treaded rather than knobby tires since that seems to be a lot of the CX bike buying market.

    Before I bought my CX bike I was tossing up between something more commuteriffic like the Redline Metro Classic (steel, triple cranks, disc brakes) and something more CX/speed/lightweight oriented. In the end I bought something that was more in the "double-duty" market segment, and made some upgrades. If I was shopping a bit more high end/dreambike I would consider a titanium model just because I've always wanted to, and even something like the Salsa Warbird Ti because I realize I love riding gravel and do more miles on that than on trails/CX terrain. I've often considered a Lynskey Cooper CX too, their main disc model for 2012 frame, which now comes in two builds - one for utility/commuter riding and one for CX racing. (Many of their 2013 frames have since been changed to use disc brakes).


    I feel that disc brakes are still rapidly changing/maturing on road/CX bikes, but I was happy enough with the current offerings to make that leap. I have disc, caliper, v-brakes, and mini v-brakes across my fleet and the discs stop the best across all conditions. (I don't have any cantis at this point so I can't compare.) They do have some annoyances - brake squeal in the wet, sometimes fiddly adjustment (could just be my lack of mechanical skills) and incompatibility with my existing road bike wheelsets - with limited off-the-shelf options. I also tend to accidentally lock them up forgetting how powerful they are.


    Note: If you go with a disc CX bike as your dream bike I would recommend getting something with a tapered 1.5 to 1.125 headtube/fork instead of a straight 1.125 one. They generally do not make full carbon disc forks for straight 1.125" headtubes (only the legs are carbon). I know at least one company used to make them and had to recall them due to failures - I assume it's because of the forces disc braking puts on a fork. If that's the case, then I imagine a tapered headtube is a better design regardless of material. My bike has a straight 1.125 and while I've considered upgrading the stock aluminum fork the best I could do is get one with carbon legs and an aluminum steerer, or go with steel. I know it's just a fork, but offroad without suspension I like as much bump absorption as possible.


    Of course, there's also the fatbike option... http://t.co/5nZAewoin4


    tl;dr <= I had coffee this morning. Also, I never think much about bikes.

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Carlsbad CA
    Posts
    50
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I've been spending some time researching CX and light touring bikes, since I need a new commuter - I'll append onto what's already been posted. CX bikes are trending, and there's lots of quality out there, in aluminum, steel and carbon frames. I like steel, since carbon CX bikes are racing bikes, and don't have fender/rack eyelets on the dropouts. I find aluminum to be sorta harsh - my current commuter is a Cannondale Bad Boy Ultra, but newer frames from some of the makers claim to have tuned the ride by shaping seat stays, etc. to absorb some of the inherent stiffness in aluminum - you have to ride and try. A few bikes that looked interesting are Specialized TriCross Elite Steel Disc Triple and the Kona Rove. Both steel bikes with mechanical discs (only way you'll get discs on a drop bar bike) and overall nice spec. I rode the Specialized, and also a Cannondale CAADX 105 (to compare and contrast) in the last week and both performed well, but differently. Cannondale was lighter and zippier (partly comes from being 6lbs lighter @ 22lbs) but didn't have the steel ride compliance that I like, and it stretches you out more than I like. I agree with the consensus here that a CX bike is not for rugged singletrack, unless you like the hardtail feel and can hold on tight to your hoods on a drop bar. I think Bianchi's cyclocross bikes (Zurigo?) are also worth a look - I sure do miss my San Jose. Now, because I'm looking for a four season commuter, with that fender/rack requirement, I'm also looking at Surly frames - the Cross Check does not come as disc-capable, and the Disc Trucker is touring geometry. May go with a Long Haul Trucker. Lots to think about, but you love to ride, so it's important to take your time. Oh, and doesn't Ann have a CX bike? What's her advice?
    Last edited by jwfisher3; 04-05-2013 at 01:49 PM.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Leesburg, VA
    Posts
    1,431
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GuyContinental View Post
    I'm kind of sick that way- I actually find the difficulty and discomfort part of the fun (I also telemark ski, unicycle, play underwater hockey and C-1 whitewater paddle so I'm definitely into masochism). BUT to the original point, she wasn't looking to ride intermediate trails, she was looking for a do-it-all ride that could also do some of the beginner trails. A CX is much better than a MTB for 90% or more of those.
    I don't disagree. I just think some people are falling into the "cross bikes are awesome trail machines" trap, which isn't true. I would not, for instance, recommend a cross bike for the NoVA epic (which includes trail in Laurel Hill, Accotink, Wakefield, Lake Fairfax and a lot of the CCT north of Fairfax).

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •