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Thread: Fix one thing, break another...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    Herndon, VA
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    Default Fix one thing, break another...

    Replaced my chain yet again last night. Usually only get 3,000 out of my commuting chains, stretched this one a little over 4,000. After numerous drops on the last few rides, I decided to swap it before it broke.

    I should've taken a picture, but at 3 links shorter than the new chain, it was the same length! WAY stretched.

    While it was off, I poked around and learned that my rear derailleur has almost no teeth left on it! Some are spikes, some are nubs. A quick records check shows between 12-13,000 miles on it. Time to shop.

    ---

    For you daily commuters like me, check your bikes over frequently. You really don't want to be stranded with a broken <insert part you just broke here>. I blew out a rim last summer on the way home, but luckily was close enough to a car dealership to snag a ride home from a friend there. Reason? 9,980 miles on it, I'd worn completely through the braking surface. Kerpow!

  2. #2
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    Here are my observations on the chain: I started using a Park Tools chain checker and replace when the chain is worn to the recommended indication on the tool. That's happening about every 2500 miles. So far I've put four chains on without changing the cassette -- a new record. In past years I found that if I run the chain 3500 miles until it's noisy, I have to replace the cassette after two chains or the chain skips.

    After investing in the chain checker tool, and tossing out more slightly worn chains, am I saving money by not buying so many cassettes? I don't know. Maybe less time spent changing gear clusters.

    I've also replaced those sprockets a couple times; they last a long time and keep working even when they're worn down to little spikes.

  3. #3
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    Can I replace the sprockets and salvage the rest of it?

  4. #4
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    Usually it's easy to replace the sprockets ( I think they're referred to as Jockey Wheels). SRAM sells a kit with new bearings and spacers for $12.95. I've replaced sprockets on Shimano by going to the bike shop and they find a couple in a drawer somewhere.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Swamptortoise View Post
    Usually it's easy to replace the sprockets ( I think they're referred to as Jockey Wheels). SRAM sells a kit with new bearings and spacers for $12.95. I've replaced sprockets on Shimano by going to the bike shop and they find a couple in a drawer somewhere.
    Good to know, thanks!

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