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Thread: Cold Toes

  1. #21
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    Good thread. Two days ago, I was six miles from home when I realized I had forgotten to put booties over my cycling shoes. I was going for a long ride that day; although at that point, my feet were fine, I knew I'd have trouble in an hour or so. I stopped into a Model's and bought a box of Hotties toe warmers. I used them each of the past three days. My impression is that they have not helped keep my toes from going numb. In fact, they hardly seem warm to me, far from the 105 degrees F promised on the box. Any suggestions? Another brand that works better?

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelsDC View Post
    I think a more plausible theory is that keeping your core warm will ensure your extremities stay warmer. My understanding is that, when you're cold, your body focuses blood flow to your organs, so if you keep your torso warm, your body can send more blood to your extremities (but I make no claims to expertise on such matters). But I don't really buy the "blood gets cold on its way" theory.
    Yeah, this is my understanding, too. Same remedy either way, though.

  3. #23
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    In response to Jim K, I think the chem warmers (e.g. Hotties) work much better in running shoes than in cycling shoes.

    I've only used them in running shoes that are a half-size larger than the ones I wear in the summer, and they've been fantastic in those. I also learned through experience (at Hains Point on New Years Day) that they work much better if I put them in at the start of my ride, *before* my toes get cold.

    On the other hand, I have been wanting to mention that after numerous attempts in many LBSs, I have yet to find neoprene shoe covers, or even toe covers, that would work with my running shoes, although someone did have luck with some other kind of Adidas sport shoe. I really tried a lot of different things before finding a solution that works well for me as a running shoe cyclist. I even dug into my scuba equipment, where I had four pairs of neoprene booties.

    Just curious - Has anyone had luck with chem warmers in cycling shoes? Or found neoprene covers that work with running shoes?
    Last edited by Arlingtonrider; 01-04-2013 at 06:43 PM.

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arlingtonrider View Post
    Just curious - Has anyone had luck with chem warmers in cycling shoes? Or found neoprene covers that work with running shoes?
    I have used chemical toe warmers in my cycling shoes and they worked fine. There's not a lot of room in there, but the shoes are practically mesh so I guess there is plenty of air circulating through.

    Arlingtonrider, have you considered McGyver-ing some neoprene socks from a dive shop for your running shoes (size XL to fit over the shoes)?

    Liz

  5. #25
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    I was all ready to proclaim the discovery of the world wide solution to cold toes. I got my new smartwool scoks for Christmas, and finally broke them out a few days ago after more chronic flat issues. To my chagrin, they did little on my 3.5 miler jaunt. So, on the way home, I doubled up. I was a little hesitant to do this because it was too tight for my toes to squeeze comfortably into my shoes last time. But I discovered the smartwools were thin enough to fit comfortably, AND best of all, keep my feet warm! Then I also made the discovery that boat shoes are not nearly as good as cycling shoes for keeping out the cold. Then I get here, and ready to announce my discovery to the world, and found you'd all basically said the same thing: double up. If only I could read. Can I just add, make sure the layers are thin enough not to squish the feeties? But that's prolly been said too. Oh well. This data now in for back up!

  6. #26
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    Fortunately my Shimano MW81 shoes (winter cycling shoes) plus Smartwool's Ph.D. knee high socks kept my feet toasty this morning (19-20 degrees).

  7. #27
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    When I use shoe covers, I sometime use chemican hand warmers between the shoe covers and my shoes. If I ever put them inside my shoes. I sweat enough to deactivate the chem warmers. They stop working.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dirt View Post
    When I use shoe covers, I sometime use chemical hand warmers between the shoe covers and my shoes. If I ever put them inside my shoes. I sweat enough to deactivate the chem warmers. They stop working.
    This info from Dirt has helped me greatly before! You need dry airflow for those chemical warmers to work. That's why they work better on top of your feet than beneath them and as far from your skin as possible. And your toes need wiggle room. No stuffing double fluffy socks into your cycling shoes - the chemical warmer will suffocate in there.

  9. #29
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    So what's the difference between a shoe cover and an overshoe?

    Thinking of getting these as winter shoes are rather spendy.

    Has anybody tried the Giro 100 Proof winter gloves? I like those other Giro gloves I got - it seems weird in these though that your fingers are separated.

    I'm gonna wind up spending all my new bike moneys on gear :P Of course having a new bike won't do me much good if I can't ride it

  10. #30
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    Wiggling my toes is my quick easy fix for when they start complaining. They don't get toasty, but they do thaw out a little. I always end up thinking of that scene in Die Hard when John McClane is making fists with his toes.
    Last edited by jopamora; 01-23-2013 at 12:06 PM. Reason: Yippie Kai Yay

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