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Thread: Chain Noise

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    Default Chain Noise

    So I finally got a new rear wheel and cassette last night. I installed them both with no problems. I also bought a new chain, but didn't have time to install it last night. Riding in today, the old chain is making a lot of noise and feels really rough. I hope it's because the chain is old and worn and the new freewheel is not, but thought I'd ask your opinions just in case.

    The freewheel is basically a new version of the old one: went from a Shimano HG 7-speed 14-28, to a Shimano HG 7-speed 13-28.

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    I'm not much of a bike mechanic, but one thing I know is that chains should always be replaced when you replace a cassette.

    Chains stretch and wear as much as cassettes do. And then you're stuck on the side of the trail with a broken chain because of your massive quads.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tim Kelley View Post
    I'm not much of a bike mechanic, but one thing I know is that chains should always be replaced when you replace a cassette.

    Chains stretch and wear as much as cassettes do. And then you're stuck on the side of the trail with a broken chain because of your massive quads.
    Yeah, my massive quads have been wreaking havoc on my old bike.

    I knew I should replace the chain too, I just didn't want to rush my first chain install and decided to wait for the weekend.

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    Name:  ImageUploadedByTapatalk1354161910.094114.jpg
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    The lesson here, kids, is don't buy cheap chain tools and leave them in your seat bag.

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    Largely because I haven't done any of the installs you've just done and are contemplating I gotta ask. Once the rear wheel was pulled and the new wheel and cassette ready to install isn't the substitution of a new chain for the old a relatively minor addition of time and effort? Cluelessness demands illumination as the cassette and chain on my Coda are getting flakey ( only the third chain in ten years ) and my iphone bike repair app makes it all look sooooooo eeeeeeeeeasy.


    Quote Originally Posted by ShawnoftheDread View Post
    So I finally got a new rear wheel and cassette last night. I installed them both with no problems. I also bought a new chain, but didn't have time to install it last night. ...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Riley Casey View Post
    Largely because I haven't done any of the installs you've just done and are contemplating I gotta ask. Once the rear wheel was pulled and the new wheel and cassette ready to install isn't the substitution of a new chain for the old a relatively minor addition of time and effort? Cluelessness demands illumination as the cassette and chain on my Coda are getting flakey ( only the third chain in ten years ) and my iphone bike repair app makes it all look sooooooo eeeeeeeeeasy.
    It's pretty easy but kind of messy and if you don't like chain packing grease (which I don't) the preliminary cleaning and re-lubing can be time-intensive (yes, I know that some folks swear by the OE grease but I can't stand it. At all. So into the sonic cleaner it goes).

    Cut old chain
    Use old chain to measure new (if using quick link, measure one link short)
    Spend 45 minutes cleaning and deep-lubing already clean chain
    Install new chain, ideally with quick link to reduce time for future chain OCD-ness

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    Quote Originally Posted by GuyContinental View Post
    It's pretty easy but kind of messy and if you don't like chain packing grease (which I don't) the preliminary cleaning and re-lubing can be time-intensive (yes, I know that some folks swear by the OE grease but I can't stand it. At all. So into the sonic cleaner it goes).

    Cut old chain
    Use old chain to measure new (if using quick link, measure one link short)
    Spend 45 minutes cleaning and deep-lubing already clean chain
    Install new chain, ideally with quick link to reduce time for future chain OCD-ness
    It took me about 45 minutes I think. I used Sheldon Brown's method of measuring the new chain, though just using the old chain sounds much easier. Then my chain tool broke and I had a bit of trouble getting the connector in all the way. Maybe I should have just used a quick link. I didn't clean or re-lube the new chain.

    The new chain feels good, but the rear is now upshifting itself one gear with each shift. Perhaps I have to tighten the rear derailleur cable (?).

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