Likes Likes:  0
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
ELITE ELITE:  0
Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Rear dropouts on Cross-Check

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Alexandria
    Posts
    1,352
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Rear dropouts on Cross-Check

    I'm still getting used to my new cross-check and I am having a problem with the rear dropouts. My first several rides were fine, but riding home after dropping the car off at the mechanic last night I noticed my wheel rubbing against the frame. Ack! It had slipped out of the dropout a little bit even though the clamp was still super tight. I was able to make it home ok, and later I was able to seat it correctly.

    This morning I was planning to bike to work and even though "I fixed it last night" within 100 yards of home the wheel slipped out again so I clearly didn't fix it properly.

    According to Surly, the rear dropout is much more adjustable than I'm used to. Is this something I should be able to fix easily or should I just take it to the shop? By screwing back the adjusters won't I also make the wheel-base longer and thus take out slack in the chain? That could cause it to not shift properly right?

    "Semi-horizontal dropouts with adjusters give you single-speed compatibility and wheel base adjustability. Our Gnot-rite spacing (132.5mm) allows you to run 130mm road hubs and 135mm MTB hubs"

  2. #2
    DismalScientist is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Westover Beer Garden
    Posts
    2,651
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by creadinger View Post
    I'm still getting used to my new cross-check and I am having a problem with the rear dropouts. My first several rides were fine, but riding home after dropping the car off at the mechanic last night I noticed my wheel rubbing against the frame. Ack! It had slipped out of the dropout a little bit even though the clamp was still super tight. I was able to make it home ok, and later I was able to seat it correctly.

    This morning I was planning to bike to work and even though "I fixed it last night" within 100 yards of home the wheel slipped out again so I clearly didn't fix it properly.

    According to Surly, the rear dropout is much more adjustable than I'm used to. Is this something I should be able to fix easily or should I just take it to the shop? By screwing back the adjusters won't I also make the wheel-base longer and thus take out slack in the chain? That could cause it to not shift properly right?

    "Semi-horizontal dropouts with adjusters give you single-speed compatibility and wheel base adjustability. Our Gnot-rite spacing (132.5mm) allows you to run 130mm road hubs and 135mm MTB hubs"
    I have found that some skewers are better than others. I had a similar problem with my Nashbar touring bike. I replaced the wheels (for a different reasons--I just wanted a better set.) and skewers and the issue disappeared.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Falls Church
    Posts
    4,472
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Sounds like a skewer issue. People have used that kind of dropout for many, many decades without problems. Hopefully it is an easy fix.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Alexandria
    Posts
    1,352
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The skewer I have down there is the one that came with my Old Man Mountain rack, which may be part of the issue as well. I don't have any idea whether those skewers are prone to problems or not. A quick google search doesn't come up with anything.

    I may just take it up to the shop because they said to come back after several rides to re-adjust all the new cables and such anyway.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Falls Church
    Posts
    4,472
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I had issues with a particular bolt-on hub that came with textured brass washers to give them a bit more bite. I found that on some frames, the contour of the washer made it so it felt like I was tightening the bolt against the dropout, but actually the washer was getting tighteneed against the inside axle face. End result was that no matter how hard I cranked that sucker down, I was just pushing the washer into the axle face and putting insufficient squeeze on the dropout face. End result was that it moved. I filed a milometer off of the washer and was able to tighten it down.

    Short version: Is there something related to the rack that may make it feel like the skewer is tight, but perhaps not having it be tight against the dropouts?

    Fondly,

    Dirt

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Alexandria
    Posts
    1,352
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Dirt View Post
    Short version: Is there something related to the rack that may make it feel like the skewer is tight, but perhaps not having it be tight against the dropouts?
    Ah yeah, I'm picking up what you're putting down now. I'll check tonight to see how it all fits together and what exactly I'm tightening the skewer bolt onto.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,319
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Is there a reason to attach the rack to the skewer rather than the frame?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Alexandria
    Posts
    1,352
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I suppose not, with this bike. But my last bike didn't have the proper mounting holes to do it. Maybe this problem will provide the good reason to mount the rack using the eyelets instead.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    4,319
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Yeah, that's the usual reason, but shouldn't apply to the cross check. You'll probably be happier with eyelet mount the first time you need to change a tire.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Alexandria
    Posts
    1,352
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    On Saturday in an attempt to remedy my problem by doing what you guys suggested I removed the rack and attempted to mount it to the eyelets instead.

    I soon realized that in the process of removing the rack I messed up the brakes in a way that I was unfamiliar with how to fix. For some reason they didn't have any spring tension pulling the pads back when they're not engaged. And then while attempting to remount the rack I realized that I didn't have any bolts long enough to mount it using the same aluminum holes for the skewer and the eyelets on the frame. With that failure I decided to install knobby tires on my touring bike because that I can handle. As luck would have it I noticed the rim was cracking in half at two different spokes on one of those wheels. Sheesh!!

    So with all of that I realized I was in over my head. I took it all up to Bicycle Space where they kindly fixed the rack/brake issue for me (which also solves the slipping dropouts problem) in under an hour and will order a new rim and build the wheel up by hand. Woo hoo!!

    When I go back to pick up the rebuilt wheel I'm going to make sure to bring some cash to put in their "cookie fund" jar.

    Anyway, thanks for your advice guys. It appears you were dead on, on the diagnosis.
    Last edited by creadinger; 12-03-2012 at 12:49 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •