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Thread: My Morning Commute

  1. #6521
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    Beautiful morning, warm, sunny, lots of people and pets out for exercise. On the MUP section of the Rt 50 trail under Ft Myer Heights was perhaps not the best place for the dog walker to stand in one lane and let their two pooches wander across the other lane entirely blocking the path with their leashes after I rang my bell twice from 200 & 100 yards back, I don't love the smell of burning rubber in the morning.
    That would be just another morning in Germany. Das sigh.

  2. #6522
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    I am pleased to announce that I had no close calls this morning. I did not have to spew my venom at any deserving vehicular offenders. However, I do respectfully request that cyclists use their bells or call out when passing. I am not continually staring into the mirror I have hanging below my left side handle bar. Instead of surprising me and almost grazing those tiny blonde hairs on my forearm, how about a notification and a foot personal space when you pass? yes, I would appreciate that. I am 40lbs bike with another 25lb-30lbs (that's 65-70lbs of moving weight not including me...take note) of white panniers and trunk bag full of computers, clothes and lunch. If I hit you, sideswipe or otherwise, you will cry when your carbon fiber fluffernutter cracks upon impact. boo hoo. do not say you were not warned flyboys.

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  4. #6523
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    You're preaching to the choir here. The vast majority of us bemoan the same thing, try to model polite trail behavior, even call out non-triggering reminders to offenders. I'd say few if any of the offenders go onto this forum. On the CCT where I ride, it's even posted on signs in non-discretionary language.

  5. #6524
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    Quote Originally Posted by elizsnyder View Post
    I am pleased to announce that I had no close calls this morning. I did not have to spew my venom at any deserving vehicular offenders. However, I do respectfully request that cyclists use their bells or call out when passing. I am not continually staring into the mirror I have hanging below my left side handle bar. Instead of surprising me and almost grazing those tiny blonde hairs on my forearm, how about a notification and a foot personal space when you pass? yes, I would appreciate that. I am 40lbs bike with another 25lb-30lbs (that's 65-70lbs of moving weight not including me...take note) of white panniers and trunk bag full of computers, clothes and lunch. If I hit you, sideswipe or otherwise, you will cry when your carbon fiber fluffernutter cracks upon impact. boo hoo. do not say you were not warned flyboys.
    You can tell very quickly the difference between a regular and a recreational rider by whether they ring their pass or say bike on your left. I have almost knocked a few people off (accidently) when they did not all their passes too.

  6. #6525
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    You should always look behind you before you change lanes. If you hit someone changing lanes, it's at least as much your fault as theirs.

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  8. #6526
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    Quote Originally Posted by hozn View Post
    You should always look behind you before you change lanes. If you hit someone changing lanes, it's at least as much your fault as theirs.
    I usually do a hand wave behind my bike (as I learned from my revered teacher, Komorebi) to indicate to following riders that I am about to pass someone ahead, I find that more comfortable than looking behind, as I worry I will hit someone while my head is turned (and I currently ride without a mirror). Of course that means trusting them to know what the signal means.

  9. #6527
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    Quote Originally Posted by hozn View Post
    You should always look behind you before you change lanes. If you hit someone changing lanes, it's at least as much your fault as theirs.
    Moto GP rules.

  10. #6528
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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    I usually do a hand wave behind my bike (as I learned from my revered teacher, Komorebi) to indicate to following riders that I am about to pass someone ahead, I find that more comfortable than looking behind, as I worry I will hit someone while my head is turned (and I currently ride without a mirror). Of course that means trusting them to know what the signal means.
    I feel like that's just something that should be practiced then. I remember learning to drive (a car) and checking the blind spot before changing lanes, and I'd always turn the car towards the left while pivoting my upper body and my mom would freak out. I am now capable of looking back without changing my direction significantly . Maybe make a point to keep your bars turned a little to the right when looking over your left shoulder.

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  12. #6529
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    Quote Originally Posted by josh View Post
    I feel like that's just something that should be practiced then. I remember learning to drive (a car) and checking the blind spot before changing lanes, and I'd always turn the car towards the left while pivoting my upper body and my mom would freak out. I am now capable of looking back without changing my direction significantly . Maybe make a point to keep your bars turned a little to the right when looking over your left shoulder.
    I learned techniques for looking back in the WABA City Cycling class, and use them when changing lanes in general traffic (where I am not likely to hit a car in front of me in the couple of seconds I am not looking forward - and the lane I am merging into is in the same direction) On a MUT though, the issue is my concern about slow moving trail users ahead of me. I will try to look behind me from time to time to see if anyone is following close, but on crowded trails with lots of peds (like the MVT) I am not sure that it is a reasonable approach to do that each time I pass someone. The following cyclist has to take some responsibility to either call their passes or at least to be look for my signal.

    Of course that is why I often try to avoid the MVT at peak times.

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  14. #6530
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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    I usually do a hand wave behind my bike (as I learned from my revered teacher, Komorebi)
    Haha, that's a good one. I nearly snorted my coffee all over my keyboard.

    To be clear, I do the hand wave only after I've used my helmet mirror to make sure that no else is trying to pass on the left. Especially on crowded trails like the MVT, I don't trust the faster-moving cyclists to call their passes or be paying enough attention to notice my hand signal.

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