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Thread: Pointless Prize: Civil War History

  1. #181
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    Default Daniel Hughes

    Daniel Hughes was a conductor, agent and station master in the Underground Railroad in Pennsylvania. He was of mixed race (African and Native American) and over six and half feet tall. He transported escaped people on his barge while shipping lumber on the Susquehanna River, hid them in the woods and caves near his home, and led them to the next station on moonless nights. Even though slavery was long banned in Pennsylvania, bounty hunters pursued runaways into northern states making the job of conductors difficult and dangerous.

    Hughes Ct (Falls Church, VA)
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  3. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlanA View Post
    Stay tuned for nicer weather. I didn't quite make it to any of these three markers today!

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    Wow! That’s a lot of snow, Alan!

  4. #183
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    I'm sure a lot of us have ridden by this marker at the W&OD and Hunter Mill Rd. Today was the first time I stopped to really read it.

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  6. #184
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    Quote Originally Posted by consularrider View Post
    I'm sure a lot of us have ridden by this marker at the W&OD and Hunter Mill Rd. Today was the first time I stopped to really read it.

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    I'm pretty sure a few of us have not only stopped over the past couple months, but also snapped a picture as well!

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  8. #185
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    Default Vienna Star Fort

    Civil War Star Fort (Vienna, VA)
    "This six-point, star-shaped earthen fort with a 130-yard perimeter was constructed on the highest point of land in the area. It provided a commanding view of the western and northwestern approaches to Vienna. ... This work, with outlying rifle trenches, is thought to have been built between 1863 and 1865 to protect the Loudoun and Hampshire Railroad that ran 100 yards to the northeast. This site is also within 200 yards of Lawyers Road, then a prominent route to the northwest as well as to the City of Fairfax."

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  10. #186
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    Default Cathay Williams

    Cathay Williams, enslaved at birth, became the first woman to enlist in the US Army. She enlisted in the 38th US Infantry under the name “William Cathay”, passing herself off as a man. Even though US Army regulations did not allow women to enlist, she managed to pass a cursory medical exam. (Her cousin and friend, both in the same regiment, knew of her deception.) She served for three years during the Reconstruction Era, traveling throughout the West, was hospitalized frequently, and was discharged after a surgeon discovered she was a woman. Ill and disabled later in life, she applied for a pension, which had been granted to some women for service in the Revolutionary War, but was denied. She is the only documented African American woman to serve in the US Army prior to 1948 law when women were allowed to join.

    Williams Avenue (Vienna, VA)
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  12. #187
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    Default Falls Church Home Front

    Falls Church Home Front (Falls Church, VA)

    "Although soldiers repeatedly overran and raided Cherry Hill Farm during the Civil War, this ca. 1845 farmhouse and the ca. 1856 barn behind it survived almost intact. William Blaisdell … and twenty-five others in the Falls Church District voted against secession in the statewide referendum held on May 23, 1861, while forty-four voted in favor. The Blaisdells, like most families in town, felt the effects of both Confederate and Union occupation. …”

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  14. #188
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    Default Henry McNeal Turner

    Henry McNeal Turner, a minister, church planter and Bishop of the African Methodist Episcopal (AME) Church, helped organize one of the first regiments of Black troops during the Civil War, and was appointed by President Lincoln as the first African American chaplain in the US Army. After the war he became active in politics and was one of 27 African Americans elected to the Georgia State Legislature, although White members refused to seat them until the US Congress protested. He supported Black nationalism and emigration.

    Turner Avenue (Falls Church, VA)
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  16. #189
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    Do national park signs or traffic circles count? Here is the impressive statue of John Logan in Logan Circle who was a Union General and later served in the senate. Much of the sign was obscured today but I think I caught that he was an advocate for veterans and instrumental in creating Memorial Day.

    Last edited by bikedavid; 02-27-2021 at 06:42 PM.

  17. #190
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    Default Jerry Lisle

    Jerry Lisle, born enslaved in Kentucky escaped with his mother. At the beginning of the Civil War, he enlisted as a private with the 29th US Colored Troops, was wounded at the Battle of the Crater and treated at L’Overture Hospital* in Alexandria. Early in his training, he broke his rifle over a comrade’s head during a drill and was charged with court-martial. It is unclear if he was convicted, but he was charged $20 for the broken rifle.

    *L’Overture Hospital served US Color Troops during the Civil War from 1863-1865.

    Lisle Avenue (Falls Church, VA)
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