Likes Likes:  50
Dislikes Dislikes:  0
ELITE ELITE:  0
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 31 to 40 of 48

Thread: Arlington Vision Zero

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Arlington
    Posts
    209
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    21st street is in Ward 2. Bike advocates in DC have noted that DDOT has aggressively delivered bike infra in Ward 6 (strongly pro bike CM Allen) and Ward 2 (CM Jack Evan's effectively neutered, and most ANCs pro bike.)Not so much in wards 3, 4, 5, and especially 7 and 8.
    Wards 2 and 6 cover downtown, the mall, and most the major employment areas in DC. Increasing bicycle accessibility in those employment centers is key to increasing bike commuting and should eventually drive greater demand in the residential oriented outer wards.

    OTOH, Arlington and Alexandria have done almost nothing for cyclists in the employment centers, focusing more on their trail networks, which end short of where commuters need to go.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Falls Church VA
    Posts
    577
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zsionakides View Post

    OTOH, Arlington and Alexandria have done almost nothing for cyclists in the employment centers, focusing more on their trail networks, which end short of where commuters need to go.
    Like the New and semi improved Ballston Mall (Quarter)! No good all day parking!


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  3. Likes rcannon100 liked this post
  4. #33
    lordofthemark's Avatar
    lordofthemark is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    The forgotten corner of Alexandria, VA
    Posts
    3,399
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by zsionakides View Post
    Wards 2 and 6 cover downtown, the mall, and most the major employment areas in DC. Increasing bicycle accessibility in those employment centers is key to increasing bike commuting and should eventually drive greater demand in the residential oriented outer wards.

    OTOH, Arlington and Alexandria have done almost nothing for cyclists in the employment centers, focusing more on their trail networks, which end short of where commuters need to go.
    Downtown DC improvements will help with bike mode share in other wards (and also from Arlington and Alexandria - arguably its easier getting to the downtown DC bike infra safely from South Arlington and from Alex than from parts of Ward 4, certainly from wards 7 and 8)

    But from what many of my bikeDC friends seem to say, that is not the reason for the prioritization of improvements in W6 and W2 (the east downtown PBL on 9th would do more to get people downtown than the new PBLs near the soccer stadium). Its politics.

    In general politics constrains staff. Staff can't act without support from electeds. Electeds (mostly) look over their shoulders at (often autocentric) voters.
    Last edited by lordofthemark; 02-24-2020 at 12:20 PM.

  5. #34
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Washington DC
    Posts
    760
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    Downtown DC improvements will help with bike mode share in other wards (and also from Arlington and Alexandria - arguably its easier getting to the downtown DC bike infra safely from South Arlington and from Alex than from parts of Ward 4, certainly from wards 7 and 8)

    But from what many of my bikeDC friends seem to say, that is not the reason for the prioritization of improvements in W6 and W2 (the east downtown PBL on 9th would do more to get people downtown than the new PBLs near the soccer stadium). Its politics.

    In general politics constrains staff. Staff can't act without support from electeds. Electeds (mostly) look over their shoulders at (often autocentric) voters.
    Correct. I've heard the same from DDOT staff directly - part of the logic behind the anticipated timing of the different projects on their "20 miles by 2022" plan is less of when design/construction can be complete and more of what can be done with minimal opposition vs. what will require a lot of public outreach and effort to make happen. When DDOT staff have only so many hours to work on projects, the rational choice is to put those hours towards projects that can be completed more easily rather than projects that require battle after battle after battle in public meetings. The hyper-local role that ANCs play in the process further complicates matters (even with a friendly CM, an unfriendly ANC meant DDOT staff had to take an inordinate amount of time to get the two blocks of protected bike lanes installed on P SW between 4th and 2nd). Heck - even the plan going forward for 20th/21st NW represents a horrible compromise to avoid the one day/week farmer's market in exchange for completely missing the connection to the heavily used R Street NW. Add to that the notion of bike lanes as a sign of gentrification and things can get really dicey for any sort of project.

    That's where some of the changes proposed in DC as part of the various pending Vision Zero bills would be a big help - by writing certain requirements into law, the staff get political cover to do what's right in more cases.

  6. #35
    dasgeh's Avatar
    dasgeh is offline Queen of Family Biking & All Things Kidical
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    5,783
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by arlcxrider View Post
    As a daily user of Quincy, I respectfully disagree that it's a "seriously good project." Southbound especially it's a non-stop sh!t$how between Fairfax and Glebe. It starts with the never-ending utility work at Fairfax that has all but obliterated the lane between 9th and Fairfax. Then there's the habitual lane blockers at the Marriott Residence Inn, the Domino's pizza delivery guys that dart across the lane without stopping (or looking), and the Mercedes dealer--their trucks constantly park in the lane just north of Glebe. In my view there are far too potential interruptions, drop-off zones, driveways (pizza), and other minor intersections for the lane to operate successfully, absent a massive increase in enforcement activity. 5 times out of ten I have to "take the lane" on Quincy.
    Quote Originally Posted by zsionakides View Post
    Quincy St was watered down before it even got to the public for discussion - it had gaps in even the most bike friendly design which was not even up to NACTO standards, which it's supposed to be per the actual plan the county adopted. I would not let my young children ride on what came out of that design.
    Southbound from Fairfax-Glebe is a shit show - it was designed 2017-18 and implemented 2018 -- before the revised Bike Element called for better. The post-Bike Element project was Fairfax - 13th -- and the part north of Washington will actually be done once the Ed Center redevelopment is done, and the design will be up for review then. The final design is full protection Fairfax - Washington(except for the very beginning and end of that southbound - beginning is a bus stop and end is a right turn mixing zone). While I 100% agree there should be better MOTs (plans for our streets, etc during construction), the Carpool construction is not part of the Quincy project.

    Quote Originally Posted by zsionakides View Post
    The Columbia Pike cycletrack was easy as it didn't require making any tradeoffs, except investing money in the corridor.
    The Columbia Pike was a HUGE lift that involved convincing the DoD to include the cycletrack in the project. It's different tradeoffs than reallocating space from parking, but it took serious leadership to get the cycletrack in the plans. It was not easy. (Also, fun fact: It's not Arlington's money. DoD is building as compensation for taking VDOT's land.)

    Quote Originally Posted by chris_s View Post
    Gotta disagree here. Goals should be concrete and we should strive to meet them.
    I think the structure of the Bike Element works: Vague goals that translate to specific action items and clear performance targets. And it makes sense to draft it from the broader to the more specific. I wouldn't expect Arlington to *ensure* safety for everyone. "Plan for" or "design for" or something else sure, but not "ensure"

  7. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Crystal City to L'Enfant Plaza
    Posts
    2,274
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dasgeh View Post
    The Columbia Pike was a HUGE lift that involved convincing the DoD to include the cycletrack in the project. It's different tradeoffs than reallocating space from parking, but it took serious leadership to get the cycletrack in the plans. It was not easy. (Also, fun fact: It's not Arlington's money. DoD is building as compensation for taking VDOT's land.)
    That is true. It went from a point of a blended bike/ped path to separate paths. That is great. I suppose the frustration is how hard the bike community had to push to make that happen. In a Bike Friendly Community, why wasn't the government doing the pushing before the cycling community had even heard of the project?

    Quote Originally Posted by dasgeh View Post
    I think the structure of the Bike Element works: Vague goals that translate to specific action items and clear performance targets. And it makes sense to draft it from the broader to the more specific. I wouldn't expect Arlington to *ensure* safety for everyone. "Plan for" or "design for" or something else sure, but not "ensure"
    So when do you think the concrete should happen? Unless the requirements are unequivocal, the easy path is to round the corners. The staff is busy and the builders want to go fast. We miss the opportunity to inject the requirements early, when they are easiest to incorporate. That often makes a program level policy turn into project level fights. The challenge with fighting at the project level is it takes more attention by the bike community and cyclists are against the "the project is too far along to change".

  8. Likes zsionakides, rcannon100, sjclaeys, Steve O liked this post
  9. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Arlington
    Posts
    209
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dasgeh View Post

    The Columbia Pike was a HUGE lift that involved convincing the DoD to include the cycletrack in the project. It's different tradeoffs than reallocating space from parking, but it took serious leadership to get the cycletrack in the plans. It was not easy. (Also, fun fact: It's not Arlington's money. DoD is building as compensation for taking VDOT's land.)
    The county had plenty of leverage in the land sale and didn't use it initially. Considering DoD agree to the cycle track after the fact, I'm sure they would have agreed early on with little push back considering it's a very small part of the overall costs. Instead Arlington had to come back and ask for the cycle track later. It's Arlington's money in terms of value for the land and not getting better value for it.

    It's the same issue with negotiating with ANCC. Arlington could have came out with a much bigger ask - say an easement for a path all the way around the course or allowing legal usage of the road through the club for cyclists which would have huge benefits - but they limited the ask to a small path.

  10. Likes Steve O liked this post
  11. #38
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Crystal City to L'Enfant Plaza
    Posts
    2,274
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Not sure the County had much leverage at the transfer. As I understand it, Congress gave the DOD the power to condemn the land. The earlier agreement was then abandoned as DOD had more freedom with condemnation.

  12. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Arlington
    Posts
    209
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Condemnation goes through a court, so it’s still in DODs interest to negotiate a deal. The condemnation limits the county’s ability to walk away, but not to negotiate.

  13. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Madison Manor
    Posts
    1,239
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Speaking of vision zero, that is what car drivers have right now of cyclists and pedestrians waiting to cross Lynn Street northward at the IOD due to the new huge "sidewalk closed" sign. Not seeing anyone, they are even more willing to ignore the no right turn sign during the leading crossing interval. I will "strive" to not get injured or killed.

  14. Likes Steve O liked this post

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •