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Thread: New bike lane markings on Pershing from Washington to Arlington Blvd

  1. #21
    DismalScientist is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judd View Post
    My favorite thing about biking is being ticked off because the county won’t put in protected bike lanes and also being ticked off when they put in protected bike lanes.
    I'm pretty sure that these are two separate groups of cyclists being ticked off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dasgeh View Post
    If a passenger side door can open in the bike lane, either the buffer area is too narrow, or the cars are parking incorrectly. I don't head through there daily, but if those who do could report back, we can pass the note along to staff. Both are fixable. FWIW, I LOVE the PBL on Veitch. More parents are biking kids to school at Key because of it.
    In my (limited) experience - there's a bit of both. See attached for an example.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    It's a pretty small buffer to begin with. Because the protection/flexposts are in the middle of the buffer, some cars (like this one) pull up to the flexpost rather than to the paint. The few times I've been through there, that's how many of the cars are parked. Doing that shrinks the buffer. Also, because of the gutter on the right, the bike lane feels smaller than it is on paper (because you don't want to ride to the right of the seam). As a result, the natural tendency is to err on the side of the cars, which further shrinks the buffer in practice.

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  5. #23
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    I've only ridden through a couple of times since the PBLs were in place, but have ridden that corridor several times before then (obviously not as much as many people here). I find the PBL at least as comfortable as riding in the conventional bike lanes (that particular spot before, and the rest of the corridor now) There is as much or more door opening on the driver side as the passenger side, and in addition there are cars crossing the conventional bike lane to park and cars stopping to drop people off, etc. Now yeah, in theory you can ride around any of those things, and I have done so. But its not comfortable, and I think it's objectively risky. Swerving into a general travel lane is NOT the same as riding in the general travel lane. It may be easier for people riding faster (?) and at the same time, stopping for a pedestrian entering the bike lane is probably more difficult.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    I've only ridden through a couple of times since the PBLs were in place, but have ridden that corridor several times before then (obviously not as much as many people here). I find the PBL at least as comfortable as riding in the conventional bike lanes (that particular spot before, and the rest of the corridor now) There is as much or more door opening on the driver side as the passenger side, and in addition there are cars crossing the conventional bike lane to park and cars stopping to drop people off, etc. Now yeah, in theory you can ride around any of those things, and I have done so. But its not comfortable, and I think it's objectively risky. Swerving into a general travel lane is NOT the same as riding in the general travel lane. It may be easier for people riding faster (?) and at the same time, stopping for a pedestrian entering the bike lane is probably more difficult.
    Agreed - what is there now is much better than what was there before. Design could use a few tweaks to make sure the buffer is properly respected, but that shouldn't take away from the improvement this represents. (Should've included this thought with the earlier post.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by LhasaCM View Post
    Agreed - what is there now is much better than what was there before. Design could use a few tweaks to make sure the buffer is properly respected, but that shouldn't take away from the improvement this represents. (Should've included this thought with the earlier post.)
    Also, this seems like a flyer campaign (to hit the regulars) and a sign by the pay to park thing (to hit the occasional parkers) should go a long way towards fixing this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LhasaCM View Post
    In my (limited) experience - there's a bit of both. See attached for an example.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    It's a pretty small buffer to begin with. Because the protection/flexposts are in the middle of the buffer, some cars (like this one) pull up to the flexpost rather than to the paint. The few times I've been through there, that's how many of the cars are parked. Doing that shrinks the buffer. Also, because of the gutter on the right, the bike lane feels smaller than it is on paper (because you don't want to ride to the right of the seam). As a result, the natural tendency is to err on the side of the cars, which further shrinks the buffer in practice.
    This looks like a picture of the part that's of substandard width (less than 5 feet wide. It feels narrow even when there's not cars there, because in addition to the gutter pan, it's narrow.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Judd View Post
    This looks like a picture of the part that's of substandard width (less than 5 feet wide. It feels narrow even when there's not cars there, because in addition to the gutter pan, it's narrow.
    Good point. That was the part between Troy and Courthouse. Here's a screengrab from the same trip of the PBL on Veitch just north of Wilson.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    And Veitch just north of Key.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Both felt (and from looking at the video actually appear to be) wider than that part of Wilson.

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    These seem like places where a more solid buffer such as planters would work better than flex posts. That would encourage care when a passenger in the car is opening their door since they wouldn't want to bang it and scratch it up.

    My gut is that the PBLs are better for slower riders that don't want to interact with general traffic, and the serious injury risk is lower since a dooring incident doesn't push them into traffic with the risk of being run over by another car. For faster riders who are more comfortable in general purpose lanes this probably isn't much of an enhancement, if any.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zsionakides View Post
    My gut is that the PBLs are better for slower riders that don't want to interact with general traffic, and the serious injury risk is lower since a dooring incident doesn't push them into traffic with the risk of being run over by another car. For faster riders who are more comfortable in general purpose lanes this probably isn't much of an enhancement, if any.
    *ding ding ding* The thing is, there are more people in the latter group, than the former, and the former can always just ride in the road.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dasgeh View Post
    *ding ding ding* The thing is, there are more people in the latter group, than the former, and the former can always just ride in the road.
    As I've said repeatedly, now the general travel lanes are narrower and do not support cars passing without having to leave the lane. This makes taking the lane less safe than before. Further, it gives the impression to drivers that bicyclists are scofflaws by not taking an allegedly good PBL right next to the general travel lane, not that this is illegal. I don't like being told by drivers to take the bike lane when I considered more dangerous. This has happened many times and, frankly, I don't think it is good for driver/cyclist relations..

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