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Thread: Recommend tires

  1. #11
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    Must say I’m a big fan of semi-slicks for all situations and environments except for snow....why? The turning habits you develop as a semi-slick rider you can apply on treads, the same cannot be said the other way around.

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  3. 10-20-2018, 04:04 PM

    I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.

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    Photo of NIMBY sign belongs elsewhere

  4. #12
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    one more photo of the rear tire

    Click image for larger version. 

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  5. #13
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    Take front tire, put it on rear.

    Take rear tire, keep it as spare. put new Conti City Ride 700x28 on the front and ride.

    Both of your current tires look completely safe to ride (judging purely by the photos); the rear is showing a bit more wear than the front, but still has some miles left (likely several hundred miles). You could certainly get away with merely swapping the rear to the front, and the front to the rear, and easily get another couple thousand miles out of that setup.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Meatmotor View Post
    You could certainly get away with merely swapping the rear to the front, and the front to the rear, and easily get another couple thousand miles out of that setup.
    Oddly enough, Sheldon strongly admonishes against this, because the wear patterns on the front and rear are so different. His argument is that the drive wheel on the rear wears a flattened area in the middle of the tread, creating a sort of corner to either side; these corners on the tire cause reduced traction when on a front wheel, because the front tire rolls to the sides in turns, and has less to grip with if thereís a pointy spot in the tread there. Iíve swapped tires rear to front many times and not had any crashes as a result, but I do think the front end squirms a little in the corners after putting a rear tire up front. Of course, all you have to do is ride that way for a while, and the tires become worn in in their new positions on the bike; and you will get more miles out of them that way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve O View Post
    That's the harder way. I just remount my tire in the opposite direction from the little pointy arrow.
    Cheater.

  9. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    I am pretty sure its time to replace them both. I am pretty sure I want to get 28's. I use the bike mostly for commuting, and for recreational rides on paved trails and streets. (I ride do recreational rides on the GCCCT or the C&O maybe once a year or so) I would like to be able to go faster, and I don't mind being a littlem more uncomfortable - I suspect any narrower than a 28 is not a great idea, but 32's are too wide.
    "too wide" defined how? I'm firmly in the camp that you can't have too wide a tire unless it doesn't fit. It's also pretty certain that getting a narrower tire won't magically make you go faster. What really affects your speed is how stiff the tire is. In general, the stiffer the tire, the more durable and the slower it will be. And because life, the more flexible the tire, the faster, more fragile, and more expensive it will be. Weight is also an important factor: the heavier you + the bike are, the higher the pressure you need at a given tire size. A wider tire lets you run with a lower pressure, which is a major factor in how a tire handles/feels/performs/lasts. Disregard tire suggestions from people significantly larger or smaller than yourself because you'll be talking apples and oranges. (With that in mind: I'm on the clydesdale end of the cycling spectrum.)

    Both of your current tires seem to be 32s (though those are the blurriest pictures in the entire world ). The "28x1 1/4xblur" is an old style measurement, where the 28 is the diameter of the tire in inches all the way across the wheel rather than the diameter of just the rubber part in millimeters. 32-622 is the same tire size in the modern format. Looks like you might have enough room for a nice 37 or 38, though it's not really easy to tell from the picture. In continental's lineup I like the top contacts in 37-622 for a decent balance between durability and performance if you can find them on sale. Other manufacturers have similar offerings.
    Last edited by mstone; 10-22-2018 at 03:20 PM.

  10. #17
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    I agree w/ mstone. I can pretty much guarantee you that my 44mm Extralight Compass Snoqualmie Pass tires roll faster than your 28/32mm tires. (And are less puncture-proof.)

    Jan Heine, who admittedly is often more provocative than scientific, says this about ROAD BIKE tire sizing "tires narrower than 38 mm don’t really make sense any longer. 38 mm tires still give you the “connected to the pavement” sensation that makes a racing bike feel so fast. Below 38 mm, all you gain is harshness. The bike doesn’t feel any better, just more jiggly." https://janheine.wordpress.com/2018/...should-i-ride/

    For a general purpose bike especially, I'd get the largest tire you can fit. In addition to something like the Conti Top Contact, I'd probably also consider some of the new lighter-weight gravel tires like the slick 40mm Panaracer Gravel King (not Gravel King SK) https://www.panaracer.com/lineup/gravel.html (They also make this in smaller sizes if your frame can't clear 40mm). The 40mm Gravel King is a good illustration of the earlier point: the reports I've read agree that it's not as fast as a similarly-sized Compass tire, despite being lighter and also having smooth tread. Casing stiffness matters more.

    There are lots of options in 32c too.
    Eg. WTB Exposure 32c if you want/need to stay a bit smaller: https://www.wtb.com/collections/road...s/exposure-32c
    Or the Specialized Roubaix 2bliss 30/32 (which is a 32mm tire): https://www.specialized.com/us/en/ro...ready/p/130434

    These are all tubeless compatible tires which adds another avenue for flat protection (albeit with some learning investment required).

    If you like thinking about tires, there's also an interesting perspective from the folks at Challenge that was featured on recent Cycling Tips podcast: https://cyclingtips.com/2018/09/cycl...-gravel-tires/ . Gist is that supple (tubular, in this case) tires are actually more resistive to flatting than tires that are built with thicker rubber. Because tire deforms around sharp objects rather than resisting and being cut by said objects.

  11. #18
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    For my "Do everything bike", I'm a huge fan of my 38c Schwalbe Marathon Almotion tires. Designed as a touring tyre, I have only punctured twice in the last year with those things riding through PG County roads (did you know PG County doesn't actively have a road sweeping contract????) and both times that sealant did it's job and I was able to carry on (I'm set up tubeless).

  12. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by hozn View Post

    If you like thinking about tires, there's also an interesting perspective from the folks at Challenge that was featured on recent Cycling Tips podcast: https://cyclingtips.com/2018/09/cycl...-gravel-tires/ .

    At this point I will spend a lot of time thinking about tires than buying, because it seems mine are good for quite a lot of added miles, perhaps especially if I swap them out, which I think I will do (but not before Saturday). I would like to complain about tires that say '28' on them actually being 32's, but given that people clip into clipless pedals, I guess I need to get used to confusing terminology (and will need to work on clincher vs tubular vs tubeless)

    Also not pleased that there does not seem to be a shortcut to faster/more durable other than more $, but as Mstone says, the way of the world.

    But my question (I imagine asked before) for all you smarties - if wider tires are faster, why do I see so many people riding skinny tires, especially people on road bikes, and in general people riding faster than I do? Does everyone with a "stronger motor" just happen to be among those fooled by skinny tire propaganda?

    another question

    from some online site that compares tires, it indicates that Contacts are lighter than, and take higher pressure than, City Riders of the same width - and Sport Contacts lighter than, and higher pressure than, Contacts.(on the other hand the Top Contact Winter is lighter still, but not quite as high max pressure as the Sport Contact) So A. Is that a good way to think about things? B Is that part of why the Top Contact is recommended? C. Wait the regular Top Contact is not lighter than sport contact - but is a folding tire?

    Or should I look at rolling resistance estimates from here https://www.bicyclerollingresistance...ontact-ii-2015
    Last edited by lordofthemark; 10-22-2018 at 05:04 PM.

  13. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post

    But my question (I imagine asked before) for all you smarties - if wider tires are faster, why do I see so many people riding skinny tires, especially people on road bikes, and in general people riding faster than I do? Does everyone with a "stronger motor" just happen to be among those fooled by skinny tire propaganda?
    Different bikes (weight, geometry, etc), overall fitness of the rider, and other factors not related to your tires contribute significantly.

    On my fancy carbon road bike with 23s I average about 15-16 MPH for long rides. On my steel adventure bike with 36 tires I average about... 15-16 mph for long rides So honestly, I don't think the tires make a huge difference, especially if you're not racing. I think a person's overall fitness, the type of bike they ride (factoring in the bike's geometry, weight, etc), and other characteristics of the rider and the bike make a bigger difference. Skinny tires tend to come on road bikes, which tend to be lighter than hybrids like your bike, so that may be why you see them so often.

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