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Thread: Should I change my name?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by NovaEbike View Post
    I really considered that but if I actually do end up meeting my weight loss goals I'd be in the same predicament haha.
    Yeah you're right about this. Isn't there some kinda horse that's strong and sturdy and not necessarily carrying extra, but just able to? (Feel like I'm describing the Rod Smith of horses )



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  3. #12
    DismalScientist is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
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    Quote Originally Posted by NovaEbike View Post

    Thanks Judd, my BMI is still about 15 lbs north of the "obese" line and then I'd have another 40 or so to get out of the "overweight" category. Realistically, if I can get below 200 hundred I'd be happy.
    Don't let those BMI Nazis get you down. It's very difficult to get out of the "overweight" category when you have developed massive thighs from biking.

    Also, tall people are discriminated against by the BMI formula. When you think about it, if you expand an object equally in all dimensions, the volume of the solid object expands by the cube of any one dimension. If "normal" people expand their girth and width as they grow taller, then the BMI formula would say that one's ideal weight is proportional to the cube of one's height. The current formula uses the square of one's height.

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    BMI is meant to measure a population, not individuals. According to BMI, for example, LeBron James is overweight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrenaut View Post
    BMI is meant to measure a population, not individuals. According to BMI, for example, LeBron James is overweight.
    So why then do Doctors keep applying it to individuals?

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    Quote Originally Posted by creadinger View Post
    So why then do Doctors keep applying it to individuals?
    Laziness, probably. Addiction to computer readouts.

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  10. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by creadinger View Post
    So why then do Doctors keep applying it to individuals?

    Because not that many people are tall enough for the inaccuracy to make much difference, esp compared to the fuzziness as to exactly at what point on the BMI (or modified BMI) scale health problems really kick in, I guess? But never having gone to the doctor as a tall person, its difficult for me to say how doctors communicate these issues with tall people.
    Last edited by lordofthemark; 09-21-2018 at 11:29 AM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    Because not that many people are tall enough for the inaccuracy to make much difference, esp compared to the fuzziness as to exactly at what point on the BMI (or modified BMI) scale health problems really kick in, I guess? But never having gone to the doctor as a tall person, its difficult for me to say how doctors communicate these issues with tall people.
    It's even stupid for short people. Let's say you're 5'2" and in decent shape - your BMI reads normal. You start training for triathlons and replace 5 pounds of fat with 15 pounds of muscle. Per BMI, you are now less healthy.

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    I just remember being at the gym years ago when BMIs were first all the rage, where there was a scale with the weights on the gym floor so one could pretty well see what each person weighed in at within a few pounds, and I would estimate their height within a few inched, could clearly see the next to no body fat and calculating that every buff person had BMIs over 30. I knew then it was all a load of hooey.
    I also discussed with a physician friend who was sure BMIs made perfect sense, but could not explain away the buff gym goer with no body fat as being obese.
    In the end you need a density measure to know for sure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by jrenaut View Post
    It's even stupid for short people. Let's say you're 5'2" and in decent shape - your BMI reads normal. You start training for triathlons and replace 5 pounds of fat with 15 pounds of muscle. Per BMI, you are now less healthy.

    People who are that fit are A. A pretty tiny minority and B. Probably quite aware of all the measurement complications on their own.

    For the vast majority of sedentary people who walk into a docs office, he is probably better off giving them a simple measure that matches what they find online (from CDC or the many folks who quote CDC) Now I suppose we could ask him to explain the alternative measures to each patient, or to have a seperate spiel for the serious athletes (and I mean serious - anecdote ain't data, but in the years I have been bicycling I have lowered my LDL cholesterol and raised my HDL, dramatically, but have NOT gained weight, so I guess have not added that much muscle) and I suppose if he does not some would call him lazy. \_(ツ)_/

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    I might be especially touchy about BMI because a stupid pediatrician, in front of my then 5 year old daughter, told me that her BMI was high and she should watch what she ate. She was 90th percentile height and she has a solid athletic build. I still regret not saying anything then - I think I was too shocked for it even to sink in how many ways the doctor was wrong.

    Anyway, BMI at the individual level is bullhonkey. Doctors should find another way to talk to patients.

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