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Thread: Waxing the Chain

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tania View Post
    I've had someone absolutely swear to me that the stuff on new chains is the best lube around. (No joke or sarcasm on my part. Maybe there was on his part and I just missed it.)
    I think that's a Sheldon Brown-ism, IIRC. In my experience, that "lube" is a magnet for gunk, and I now clean it off before I install a new chain.

    Edit: Should've refreshed the page before I replied...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Harry Meatmotor View Post
    buy a wax-based liquid lubricant like Rock'n'roll,
    Are you sure Rock'n'Roll is wax-based? I had heard it was a PTFE lubricant but I've never seen it described as wax-based (it is usually contrasted to wax lubricants -- but sometimes also contrasted to "other PTFE" lubricants, so I'm not entirely sure what that says).

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    This thread makes my head hurt - too many choices/decisions.

    I've become much better about drive train maintenance. Wipe it down and re-lube (I'm a T-9 girl) every third or fourth ride and then if it's been in wet (rain, raging creeks, on the back of my car in a thunderstorm) I'll use some Finish Line citrus degreaser before re-lubing. Every so often I'll use the park tool chain cleaner thingy that jabberwocky told me I should buy but turning on the hose is just such a pain (the spigot valve is in a tough spot).

    I do apply a single drop of lube to each link which makes the SO crazy. Drip, drip, drip, drip, drip, turn cranks a little bit, drip, drip, drip.

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    Haha Tania, that's why I started this thread. So much information on the web out there, so many contrasting opinions. I was curious to get the thoughts of local people, especially those who are avid tech people.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 using Tapatalk

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    The biggest factor that helped me lube more often is putting two things next to my bike: Chain lube(on a shelf next to the bike), and chain measuring tool(hanged on a wall, using a nail). So they are on full sight every time I take the bike. What oil to use almost doesn't matter as long as you are lubing more often. Everybody seems to have their favorite lubing method that swear by. There is no wrong way to lube(Almost), just focus on more lubing, and less about which oil/grease to use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tania View Post
    This thread makes my head hurt - too many choices/decisions.

    I've become much better about drive train maintenance. Wipe it down and re-lube (I'm a T-9 girl) every third or fourth ride and then if it's been in wet (rain, raging creeks, on the back of my car in a thunderstorm) I'll use some Finish Line citrus degreaser before re-lubing. Every so often I'll use the park tool chain cleaner thingy that jabberwocky told me I should buy but turning on the hose is just such a pain (the spigot valve is in a tough spot).

    I do apply a single drop of lube to each link which makes the SO crazy. Drip, drip, drip, drip, drip, turn cranks a little bit, drip, drip, drip.
    Rock'n'Roll is so much easier. Spray while turning the cranks backwards a few times ... turn backwards a few more times .... wipe it all off ... done. It literally takes 20 seconds to lube the chain. And no cleaning ever needed. You pay for it, though -- in dollars; that stuff ain't cheap and I use a lot more than with a drip lubricant. But it's so worth it in the time it saves me messing with my bike. Especially that part of my bike.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hozn View Post
    Are you sure Rock'n'Roll is wax-based? I had heard it was a PTFE lubricant but I've never seen it described as wax-based (it is usually contrasted to wax lubricants -- but sometimes also contrasted to "other PTFE" lubricants, so I'm not entirely sure what that says).
    It's wax. It probably has some PTFE in the mix tho, too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bentbike33 View Post
    So what is the best degreaser for getting rid of the stuff chains are coated with for shipment?
    non-diluted simple green if you're willing to let it soak over night.

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  13. 08-06-2018, 06:30 PM

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    double post...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old man yelling at clouds
    The factory lubricant all by itself is usually good for several hundred miles of service if the bike is not ridden in wet or dusty conditions. It is best not to apply any sort of lube to a new chain until it is clearly needed, because any wet lube you can apply will dilute the factory lube.
    Yeah, so if you're interested in getting grit into the rollers in a heartbeat, the factory grease is great. "not ridden in wet or dusty conditions". As a lubricant, grease is really good at staying put and maintaining a cushioning barrier between moving metal parts, but it does very little to keep dirt out; rather, it collects it. So it turns into great lubricity plus sandpaper. It also doesn't do a good job at moving the teeny tiny bits of metal that come off the chain during use away from the pins and rollers even if you ride in non-dusty non-wet conditions. Nearly 17 people in the entire cycling universe are blessed with non-dusty, non-wet conditions all year 'round.

    Cleaning off the factory grease side-steps "several hundred miles of service" that will prematurely wear the chain before you apply any chain lube afterwards.
    Last edited by Harry Meatmotor; 08-06-2018 at 06:55 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tania View Post
    This thread makes my head hurt - too many choices/decisions.

    I've become much better about drive train maintenance. Wipe it down and re-lube (I'm a T-9 girl) every third or fourth ride and then if it's been in wet (rain, raging creeks, on the back of my car in a thunderstorm) I'll use some Finish Line citrus degreaser before re-lubing. Every so often I'll use the park tool chain cleaner thingy that jabberwocky told me I should buy but turning on the hose is just such a pain (the spigot valve is in a tough spot).

    I do apply a single drop of lube to each link which makes the SO crazy. Drip, drip, drip, drip, drip, turn cranks a little bit, drip, drip, drip.
    You and Silca NFS or Dumond Tech Pro are a match made in heaven. Boeshield T-9 was developed more as a corrosion inhibitor that ended up being okay as a lubricant. As far as I understand it, Boeing developed Boeshield t-9 to spray on fancy machined aluminum parts for airplanes that to sat on shelves for 6 months in a warehouse before use. Not exactly the same as bike chains, but close.

    I'll also add that in the realm of lubricants there are two main camps: wet lube and dry lube. wet lube is generally oil-based and attracts dirt (but not water), but has marginally better lubrication and cushioning properties. Dry lube is generally wax-based and tends to shed dirt (but captures water), and has similar lubricity and cushioning properties compared to oil-based lubricants. Generally...

    Ultimately, cleanliness is next to Godliness with regards to chain longevity.
    Last edited by Harry Meatmotor; 08-06-2018 at 07:02 PM.

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