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Thread: Daenaerys Targaryen the breaker of chains

  1. #21
    lordofthemark's Avatar
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    So I need a new chain. The best outcome is I remove the chain (quite confident doing that with the standard chain breaking tool, since I will replace the chain anyway). Leave bike in the bike room, go to a bike shop (or REI) by car, get a new chain, and replace the chain myself (never done that, but the logical next step in my evolution as newbie amateur bike mechanic)

    But. Everyone says with a worn chain, you need to check the cassette and crankset for wear.


    So. Next step, look at the cassette and crankset for wear.

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    The crankset is the one that was on the bike when I received it from Karen, and I have ridden it almost 6,000 miles since then. Not sure how many miles Karen had on the crankset. When I replaced the cassette last, I kept the crankset, in part because the least worn ring was the middle one, which is the one I usually ride (and almost always commute) in. Karen and I appear to have different riding styles, which turns out to have been good. As it happens, this Saturday I was riding in high gear on the crankset instead of middle gear (to bomb down George Mason, for my own meaning of bombing) and then, I guess, for whatever reason, went into low gear on the crankset going up the grade on North Hampton - which may have had an impact on what happened to the chain, I guess?

    So I am resigned to a new crankset.

    The cassette was new with the chain, so just under 3,200 miles. I would be somewhat more disappointed in needing a new cassette, especially if its my own fault for not checking the chain more often. OTOH I do shift the cassette a lot.

    I MIGHT consider replacing the cassette myself, that's easier than replacing the crankset, right? But I don't think I want to mess with the crankset. I think I will need to take the bike into a shop, but would appreciate any advice (consensus preferred of course) before I go.
    Last edited by lordofthemark; 06-02-2018 at 07:14 AM.

  2. #22
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    BTW we do have one of those crank arm puller things in the bike room. I mean IF people think the cassette is still okay, and suggest I follow Hozn's advice and keep this chain and run it down with the cassette, I suppose I could TRY removing the crankset myself. But I am nervous about doing it right, even supposing I am physically able to (haven't tried yet, so not sure how physically hard it is)

  3. #23
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    Default Daenaerys Targaryen the breaker of chains

    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    So I need a new chain. The best outcome is I remove the chain (quite confident doing that with the standard chain breaking tool, since I will replace the chain anyway). Leave bike in the bike room, go to a bike shop (or REI) by car, get a new chain, and replace the chain myself (never done that, but the logical next step in my evolution as newbie amateur bike mechanic)

    But. Everyone says with a worn chain, you need to check the cassette and crankset for wear.


    So. Next step, look at the cassette and crankset for wear.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20180602_073337.jpg 
Views:	29 
Size:	88.8 KB 
ID:	17989


    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20180602_073521.jpg 
Views:	28 
Size:	84.0 KB 
ID:	17990

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	20180602_073527.jpg 
Views:	30 
Size:	84.4 KB 
ID:	17991

    The crankset is the one that was on the bike when I received it from Karen, and I have ridden it almost 6,000 miles since then. Not sure how many miles Karen had on the crankset. When I replaced the cassette last, I kept the crankset, in part because the least worn ring was the middle one, which is the one I usually ride (and almost always commute) in. Karen and I appear to have different riding styles, which turns out to have been good. As it happens, this Saturday I was riding in high gear on the crankset instead of middle gear (to bomb down George Mason, for my own meaning of bombing) and then, I guess, for whatever reason, went into low gear on the crankset going up the grade on North Hampton - which may have had an impact on what happened to the chain, I guess?

    So I am resigned to a new crankset.

    The cassette was new with the chain, so just under 3,200 miles. I would be somewhat more disappointed in needing a new cassette, especially if its my own fault for not checking the chain more often. OTOH I do shift the cassette a lot.

    I MIGHT consider replacing the cassette myself, that's easier than replacing the crankset, right? But I don't think I want to mess with the crankset. I think I will need to take the bike into a shop, but would appreciate any advice (consensus preferred of course) before I go.
    Replacing a square taper crankset is super easy (replacing most cranks is easy). Takes maybe 5 minutes once you figure out how to use the crank puller, and assuming you have a torque wrench. If replacing a cassette is a 3 on the difficulty scale, the crank is a 3.5.

    YouTube will teach you....

  4. #24
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    The rear gears look worn to me. You need to determine if you have a cassette or freewheel. Here is a ParkTool page with video that helps, which also shows which lock ring tool that you need. Removing it is tough if you don't have the right tools. If it's a freewheel, the hardest part is removing the gears, I had to use a water pipe for leverage(Home depot sells 2 feet pre-cut segment, just make sure that you get one wide enough for whatever wrench you are using). Here is a YouTube video showing this method. Some use a vise, which works fine, I have seen bike shop use that method. If it's a cassette, it is easy if you have a chain whip, here is a method by using an old chain if you don't have a chain whip.

  5. #25
    lordofthemark's Avatar
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    Problem is, it's past 2, if I try doing it myself now, I miss the chance to take it to Phoenix bikes if I can't fix it. (Had to drive POTM somewhere). So I am go8ng to take it in.

    Side benefit. QOTM: Most of your friends would just ride their other bike, right?
    Last edited by lordofthemark; 06-02-2018 at 01:25 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    So I am resigned to a new crankset.
    I think you mean new chainrings. You shouldn’t have to replace the cranks, just the sprockets that attach to the spider.

  8. #27
    DismalScientist is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
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    Of course, often a set of chainrings cost more than a complete crankset.

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    How to measure Bolt Circle Diameter (BCD) for chainrings: Link1, Link2

    Chainrings ar REI, Performance Bike, Spokes.

    If you need a new cassette, I had a good experience with Sunrace cassettes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DismalScientist View Post
    Of course, often a set of chainrings cost more than a complete crankset.
    My very cursory research seems to indicate that you’d have to really move up in quality on the rings for them to oputprice a crankset. It’s not difficult to get quality rings for $15 each; it would be a piece of junk triple crankset that costs less than $45.

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  13. #30
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    actually, Dkel - it's becoming the opposite case.

    Replacing inexpensive chainrings is becoming increasingly difficult due to (lack of) parts availability. Sure, you could throw 3 new chainrings @ $15-30 a pop, but, for the most part, it's easier nowadays to track down a complete Tourney crankset (which are not junk; they're heavy, but they shift great and are plenty durable). Only if you're trying to match exact tooth counts across all rings would I recommend replacing individual rings. If you don't really care whether your middle ring is 34 or 36 tooth, I'd just go Tourney. It's shockingly inexpensive to replace the entire crankset.

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