Page 1 of 5 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 42

Thread: Keeping feet warm during FS

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    51
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Keeping feet warm during FS

    I know this is a repeated topic, but I want to hear from fellow FS riders facing these harsh early winter temps.

    Last year was my first year with FS, and I was kind of let down by the few days we had with truly below freezing days.

    This year, weíre plunging right in with the sub freezing temps. Iíve been struggling in keeping my feet warm. Iíve tried various thickness wool socks. Iíve tried wearing a thin pair of socks under a looser pair of wool socks. I keep the Velcro straps on my shoes loose so as not to constrict my blood flow. I wear neoprene shoe covers to try to keep the wind out. I wear wool leg warmers to keep my legs warm. But I still finish my rides with ice toes.

    I just donít know where else to go aside from dropping a few hundred bucks on a pair of winter cycling shoes.

    Any other suggestions are greatly appreciated.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  2. Likes josh liked this post
  3. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    College Park, MD
    Posts
    94
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I don't clip in. So what I have been wearing that have been comfortable enough for at least 15 miles... First layer, thin socks with some wool content. Second layer, thicker socks - doesn't have to include wool. Third layer, Ziploc bags over the front of the foot. Fourth layer, some old Thinsulate brand boots. Toes have been a little chilled, but not the blocks of ice that I have felt them at before. I have also tried cycling shoes meant for inclement weather instead of the boots (not as much room for air and water to seep in), but it's been too cold for that the past few days.

    I am also a firm believer in making sure to keep my legs warm enough - I've been wearing multiple layers on those - to encourage better blood circulation to my extremities.

  4. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Location
    Fairfax/Vienna/Falls Church
    Posts
    439
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    What kind of distance/time are we talking about here?

  5. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2018
    Location
    Germantown, Maryland
    Posts
    13
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Cold toes

    Quote Originally Posted by SurlyTed1187 View Post
    I know this is a repeated topic, but I want to hear from fellow FS riders facing these harsh early winter temps.

    Last year was my first year with FS, and I was kind of let down by the few days we had with truly below freezing days.

    This year, weíre plunging right in with the sub freezing temps. Iíve been struggling in keeping my feet warm. Iíve tried various thickness wool socks. Iíve tried wearing a thin pair of socks under a looser pair of wool socks. I keep the Velcro straps on my shoes loose so as not to constrict my blood flow. I wear neoprene shoe covers to try to keep the wind out. I wear wool leg warmers to keep my legs warm. But I still finish my rides with ice toes.

    I just donít know where else to go aside from dropping a few hundred bucks on a pair of winter cycling shoes.

    Any other suggestions are greatly appreciated.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    I feel your pain. My toes are very susceptible to the cold. So I ordered some winter cycling shoes, but in the meantime here's what I do...

    1. I put small toe warmers/hot hands under the arch of my foot (outside sock but inside shoe).

    2. I add an extra layer of wind block by placing plastic sandwich bags over the toe of my shoe before I put the full over boot on. I have to tear the plastic and pull around the cleat.

    3. I stop for re-warming breaks every 45 min or so.

    I'm a newbie so I am still trying different things out. Good luck.

  6. Likes Judd liked this post
  7. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    207
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I didn't try them, but you could use these socks designed for scuba divers:

    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00KK4AC7W/

    Buy them locally, most dive shops in the area carry them(Google map link), for the same price as Amazon. I bought one from Amazon, but it was too small, cutting blood circulation. My shoe size is 8.5W, or 9, and I ordered the Large, when I should have ordered X-Large. I returned mine and had to pay $5 for return shipping. I didn't buy one locally yet, but you can try them before you buy them. The weather forecast calls for warm and toasty 46 degrees next Monday and after. I will wait and see if the cold continues. Meanwhile, I am experimenting with these $18 sneaker from Walmart, which don't have any vents, even the flap under the shoelaces is made with a solid piece of plastic, so it's essentially windproof. I am using these thermal socks, which I found at Dick's Sporting Goods. My feet still feel cold even though I limit my speed to 7 to 10 MPH. Last year I tried the grocery bag trick over socks with different shoes with small number of vents(Nike Air Monarch IV), and it did make a noticeable difference. I might try that tomorrow and see if my feet stay warm enough.

  8. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Falls Church
    Posts
    97
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SurlyTed1187 View Post
    I know this is a repeated topic, but I want to hear from fellow FS riders facing these harsh early winter temps.

    Last year was my first year with FS, and I was kind of let down by the few days we had with truly below freezing days.

    This year, weíre plunging right in with the sub freezing temps. Iíve been struggling in keeping my feet warm. Iíve tried various thickness wool socks. Iíve tried wearing a thin pair of socks under a looser pair of wool socks. I keep the Velcro straps on my shoes loose so as not to constrict my blood flow. I wear neoprene shoe covers to try to keep the wind out. I wear wool leg warmers to keep my legs warm. But I still finish my rides with ice toes.

    I just donít know where else to go aside from dropping a few hundred bucks on a pair of winter cycling shoes.

    Any other suggestions are greatly appreciated.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Two suggestions: 1) Minimize heat loss from your head; insulated skull cap that covers the ears, insulated/wind proof helmet cover. 2) Cut out any caffeine before the ride as it constrict capillaries, perhaps even an aspirin to keep the blood thin and slippery.

    Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk

  9. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Location
    Falls Church
    Posts
    97
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SurlyTed1187 View Post
    I know this is a repeated topic, but I want to hear from fellow FS riders facing these harsh early winter temps.

    Last year was my first year with FS, and I was kind of let down by the few days we had with truly below freezing days.

    This year, weíre plunging right in with the sub freezing temps. Iíve been struggling in keeping my feet warm. Iíve tried various thickness wool socks. Iíve tried wearing a thin pair of socks under a looser pair of wool socks. I keep the Velcro straps on my shoes loose so as not to constrict my blood flow. I wear neoprene shoe covers to try to keep the wind out. I wear wool leg warmers to keep my legs warm. But I still finish my rides with ice toes.

    I just donít know where else to go aside from dropping a few hundred bucks on a pair of winter cycling shoes.

    Any other suggestions are greatly appreciated.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Two suggestions: 1) Minimize heat loss from your head; insulated skull cap that covers both ears, insulated/wind proof helmet cover. 2) Cut out any caffeine before the ride as it constrict capillaries, perhaps even an aspirin to keep the blood thin and slippery.

    Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk

  10. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Alexandria
    Posts
    342
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The best thing I have found is having shoes large enough to accommodate heavy wool socks and a liner sock. If you add winter shoes to that and you should be good. I used that combination in Alaska... Same for booties, make sure they aren't tight fitting, just snug enough. I bought a pair of Gore socks that are amazing. Pretty much replaced booties in a shoe that accommodates them and a thin wool liner sock. I also put duct tape over the vents on those shoes (fashion police will not approve). It's looking like I might break out my winter shoes this year, mine are only useful in the single digits or below. The duct tape only cuts it down to 20-25F or so. Gaiter's can help add a few degrees too and you might have some already. The weird area for me is a 10 degree morning and a 30 degree evening commute...I'm going to struggle one way or the other. On a longer ride you'll sweat out something that is too warm and freeze, a change of socks helps.

    My cut off for riding up north was -20F, where frostbite becomes a serious issue, but my record ride of any distance was -37F. If your feet get cold while riding, hop off the bike and walk or jog until they warm up. And there is a difference between my toes are cold and "I am going to lose a toe if I keep this up" cold.

    Bottom line, shoes that are a couple euro sizes too big with heavy socks with liner and snug but not tight booties. Or, winter shoes for heavy socks combo if that's not enough.

  11. Likes kwarkentien liked this post
  12. #9
    Steve O's Avatar
    Steve O is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Dominion Hills in Arlington VA
    Posts
    3,815
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I give up on clipping in when it gets cold enough. I wear regular winter boots, the ones I use to shovel snow in. Clunky, but my feet don't get cold.

  13. Likes FFX_Hinterlands liked this post
  14. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    51
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dplasters View Post
    What kind of distance/time are we talking about here?
    My commute is 14 miles each direction, right around an hour.

    The rest of my body stays warm with my other gear. Itís just my toes that suffer.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •