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Thread: FS Newbies

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by ltierstein View Post
    The previous responses seem to have addressed keeping the toes warm, but not keeping the bike upright.
    Lending a shovel to keep trails clear boosts Bike Karma and provides a magic cloak of protection.

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  3. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Birru View Post
    Lending a shovel to keep trails clear boosts Bike Karma and provides a magic cloak of protection.
    Also this. Birru cleared a lot of the W&OD in Falls Church last year. LSG, Komorebi and Bobco cleared the ramp to the 14th St Bridge and a path through the LBJ Memorial Grove last year.

    Good news is that the NPS has markers up this year indicating plans to plow LBJ.

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  5. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuxtr View Post
    I haven't tried the Gore Windstopper base layer. But I have worn my Oxygen Classics jersey as a base layer under a long-sleeve jersey. Since the windstopper fabric both blocks wind but also breathes it "works" used as a base layer. And even under a jersey, it also "works" as a wind blocker without it having to be on the outside. And eliminates the need for both a base layer for thermal/wicking purposes and an outer layer for wind blocking purposes. That said, based on temp and wind, I've also added a Windstopper wind vest on top of that when it's 30-something degrees and blowing 15-20 mph. As you suggested, people should experiment with different layers and configurations of layers to figure out what works for them under what conditions.
    Totally agree that combining different layers for different conditions is the way to go. Also, there's a distinction between WindStopper(TM), a brand, and wind stopping, which is what windbreakers and shells and ski jackets do. WindStopper(TM) is welcome to sell jerseys and base layers and coffee makers and electric dog polishers with their branding if they like, whether or not they actually stop the wind.

    If one wears two layers of wind-stopping clothing, only the outer layer stops the wind. The inner layer still provides additional thermal comfort, but its wind-stopping quality is irrelevant. Perfectly sensible, though, because on a warmer day, that inner jersey may be the outer layer, or the only layer. So it can serve multiple purposes.

    A base layer by definition, though, is always worn under and, presumably, only on days when it is cold enough to also wear a shell or other wind-stopping layer on top of it. Wearing a non-wind-stopping layer on top of a wind-stopping layer results in losing almost all the thermal warmth of the outer layer because the wind steals it away. When it is cold enough to need to stop the wind, the wind-stopping always goes on the outside. Hence it makes no sense to have a wind-stopping base layer. A WindStopper(TM) base layer, that is branded such and meant to be paired with other WindStopper(TM) products is a fine marketing idea. However, it only needs to be thermal, not wind-stopping.

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  7. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve O View Post
    Totally agree that combining different layers for different conditions is the way to go. Also, there's a distinction between WindStopper(TM), a brand, and wind stopping, which is what windbreakers and shells and ski jackets do. WindStopper(TM) is welcome to sell jerseys and base layers and coffee makers and electric dog polishers with their branding if they like, whether or not they actually stop the wind.

    If one wears two layers of wind-stopping clothing, only the outer layer stops the wind. The inner layer still provides additional thermal comfort, but its wind-stopping quality is irrelevant. Perfectly sensible, though, because on a warmer day, that inner jersey may be the outer layer, or the only layer. So it can serve multiple purposes.

    A base layer by definition, though, is always worn under and, presumably, only on days when it is cold enough to also wear a shell or other wind-stopping layer on top of it. Wearing a non-wind-stopping layer on top of a wind-stopping layer results in losing almost all the thermal warmth of the outer layer because the wind steals it away. When it is cold enough to need to stop the wind, the wind-stopping always goes on the outside. Hence it makes no sense to have a wind-stopping base layer. A WindStopper(TM) base layer, that is branded such and meant to be paired with other WindStopper(TM) products is a fine marketing idea. However, it only needs to be thermal, not wind-stopping.
    Who's on first?

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  9. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judd View Post
    Who's on first?
    tl;dr - Wind stopping goes on the outside. Base layers go on the inside. Q.E.D. - base layers that are wind stopping are non-sensical

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  11. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve O View Post
    tl;dr - Wind stopping goes on the outside. Base layers go on the inside. Q.E.D. - base layers that are wind stopping are non-sensical
    Thank you for stopping your own wind.

  12. #47
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    Basic extremity kit...buff (head), overboots -- which can be worn over any kind of shoe or sneaker, regardless if it is bike specific or not (I prefer fleece lined neoprene from Performance as they are awesome and cheap...and I wear them while shoveling snow!), but do not combine the lobster (w/ ti-liners) and bar mitts at the same time as they are mutually exclusive due to overheating in any temp. Ride on...through the winter!

    Sent from my VS501 using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Boomer2U; 01-08-2018 at 10:55 PM.

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  14. #48
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    Hardly any fancy bike wear for me. I'm not a clipper-inner!

    I hiked a lot before I biked a lot. Also, I bike to commute and for other transportation, mostly, with only a few longer rides (over 10 miles).
    So.
    30-40's -
    -- running shoes or low hiking shoes, Darn Tough wool (smart wool?) socks
    -- fitted jean or tights (I recently bought stretchy jeans and they've been great, even today, for shorter rights).
    -- if windy, I add my rain hiking pants - they make it warm/sweaty on the inside, but keep out the wind. Marmot precip I think. On the expensive side, but I don't think as much as bike wear. They double as my rain gear.

    Still trying to figure out when/how to wear bike shorts (for padding on longer rides) under winter gear. Ladies on the Women & Bicycles FB page helped with that, so I'm trying different combos.

    -- non-cotton top, fleece shell, hiking rain jacket ($40 or $50) or cycling windbreaker
    -- balaclava
    -- warn biking gloves

    If it's colder, I add a wool zip up top under all that. And hiking boots. Thanks Komorebi for the suggestion!
    They keep my toes warm and generally dry!

    I'm not concerned about aerodynamics, just staying warm and dry!

    I have learned that for short rides (commutes), I'd rather be underdressed than overdressed - now that my commute is only 25 mins.

    I did buy Bar Mitts last year, anticipating more cold, but the couple of times I used them, they were too warm. I think if it's 25 or under they may come in handy.

    Oh, and I have my 10 year old ski goggles handy, in case is really gets nasty out there this winter!

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  16. #49
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    Lots of great suggestions in this thread. One additional idea: when I first started commuting through the winter, after every commute, I would take a few minutes to jot down the temperature and wind conditions, what I was wearing, and what worked or didn't (e.g., "core sweaty, toes cold"). I eventually accumulated enough data points to create a chart indicating what works for me at 55 degrees, 50 degrees, 45 degrees, 40 degrees, etc. That chart now resides on my phone, so that I never have to guess about what layers to wear.

  17. #50
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    Don't forget to look at humidity as well. A 30 / 70% humidity day can feel warmer than a 40 / 30% humidity day

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930AZ using Tapatalk

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