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Thread: Rear Derailleur adjustment for newbies

  1. #11
    lordofthemark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve O View Post
    If you can put it on a stand (or hang it on a tree branch or whatever) and turn the pedals, you should be able to ascertain if the squeak is coming from the derailleur.
    If it doesn't squeak on the stand but it does while you are riding, then it is you that is squeaking.
    http://bikearlingtonforum.com/showth...114#post127114

    So, er, like yeah.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    ...
    My questions to the hive mind - is adjusting a derailleur hard (assume I have a pretty full slate of tools, thanks to the building's bike room) ? Is there anything I can seriously mess up if I do it wrong?
    There is one thing I can think of where you can seriously mess things up with a derailleur adjustment: if you let out one of the limit screws too much, you could possibly "overshift", which is more likely to happen when going to easier gears/larger cogs. What will happen is the chain will jump over the top of the cassette and get jammed between the spokes and cassette. I've seen it so bad that the person had to break their chain and remove their cassette to untangle the mess. On the other end of the cassette, when shifting down all the way to the smallest cog/hardest gear, the chain can possibly get stuck between the cassette and frame.

    I agree with the others that say it could be a jockey wheel squeaking, or like Hozn suggested, a rubber endcap -- which on Shimano hubs I've worked on, the endcap stays stationary while the hub body rotates, rubbing each other and possibly making noise. Check out my pic...

    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judd View Post
    Don't hang your bike from a tree, Jeanne.
    But I will agree that putting your bike in a stand or something else that is not a tree is helpful for locating sounds. I had a squeak once that I swore was coming from the chain ring while I was riding but was actually the squeak of an improperly torqued handlebar.

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    I spent an entire commute once trying to locate a squeak. It was not coincident with wheel rotation, chain rotation or crank rotation. It squeaked when I went over bumps. As I was riding I kept holding different things: fender, bottle cage, light mount, etc. to see if it would stop. But no, every bump, a little squeak.
    It had rained the day before, and I thought maybe it had something to do with that. "Dang...it's somewhere here towards the front of the bike." I just couldn't pinpoint it, though. For 20 minutes I searched and searched.
    Turns out it was the rain. The rain had soaked the spongy things inside my helmet. Each time I hit a bump the helmet would move slightly and they would rub against the inside of the helmet, making a little squeak. It was so close to my ear that I could not determine where it was coming from. I had a good laugh at myself.

  5. #15
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    I put the bike up on the rack, and yeah, I guess this time it did seem like the squeak was coming from the jockey wheels. I lubed them as best I could (I don't yet have spray lube). They still squeak - it looks like the chain presses against the metal thing that holds the jockey wheel. I will get spray lube and try that, but I fear that will not solve it, and again, I am reluctant to mess with the jockey wheel or it's holder. And I fear the rubbing, aside from being embarrassing, is doing damage to the chain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    I put the bike up on the rack, and yeah, I guess this time it did seem like the squeak was coming from the jockey wheels. I lubed them as best I could (I don't yet have spray lube). They still squeak - it looks like the chain presses against the metal thing that holds the jockey wheel. I will get spray lube and try that, but I fear that will not solve it, and again, I am reluctant to mess with the jockey wheel or it's holder. And I fear the rubbing, aside from being embarrassing, is doing damage to the chain.
    How many miles are on the derailleur? Sounds like maybe one of the jockey wheels is shot if the chain is rubbing on the derailleur cage (which, by the way, will suffer far more damage from this condition than the chain).

  7. #17
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    Well I have ordered spray lube from the evil folks in Seattle (not tim and bobco) .

    But I have a different problem. Sunday before last I took my first ride with bar mitts. I always get a little confounded shifting under them till I am used to it, and made the mistake of taking the Custis Westbound, and shifting the crankset into the small gear. Which resulted in the chain getting caught in between the bike and the crankset, so that the bike was immobilized, not even walkable. Not wanting to carry it to a bike shop or a bus, I played with it awhile, and finally brute forced the chain out. Yay!. But after that I found it slipped badly in several gears on the cassette (its okay on the biggest gear, and the four smallest, but almost unrideable on the gears between, which I do like to use). I talked to LSG about this at the next CCCC, and he diagnosed the problem as a stiff chain link which would account for why the slippage was happening right after the chain incident. And he suggested that it would be consistent with the other gears working, if the geometry was such that the chain could fit more comfortably over them. He also gave me a way to check for a bad link.

    However by the time I put the bike on a stand and checked, I had forgotten his suggested way to check. I ran the chain around and looked for a particular inflexible link, but didn't find any. I also tried a method I found online, looking for ones that jumped over the jockey wheel when the chain is moved backward, and didn't see any of that either.

    Meanwhile I have been riding minus some gear options, which is unpleasant in a couple of ways. Before I take it into a shop, if anyone can either offer an alternative diagnosis, or a way to check for stiff links, I would be happy.

  8. #18
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    It sounds like the strategies you used are the same I would use (you can see a stiff link jump over the jockey wheels).

    Is it possible you bent your derailleur hanger when you had this chain suck issue?

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    Given the chain-suck incident and its violent resolution, I would suspect one or more links may be bent, and with that comes the danger of breaking the chain as a plate comes off the pin. This would explain the chain skipping in the larger cogs, but not the largest cog, as the bent link catches on the shifting ramps on these cogs.

    Probably time for a new chain.

  10. 11-29-2017, 09:52 AM

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  11. #20
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    Here are three pictures of the rear derailleur, from different angles. It does not appear out of place to me, but perhaps others have more insight.
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    Click image for larger version. 

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    I again looked at the chain. I saw nothing that looked to me like a bad link, no loose plates, and it moved smoothly over the jockey wheel. It did make slipping noises over the cassette gear, but I could not what physically was doing that.

    I am thinking of just taking it in to a bike shop at this point. There is one a block from here, and I am sorely tempted.
    Last edited by lordofthemark; 11-29-2017 at 10:01 AM.

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