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Thread: Squeaking, chain, and related

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by hozn View Post
    How "stretched" is the chain? If it's 0.75 or more, I wouldn't change it; the damage is done. (It's true that I don't think it makes economic sense to change chains at all, but will concede that you get maybe 10-15% more life out of a cassette if you change chains around 0.5. At least that is my experience.)

    But a stretched chain won't squeak.

    Most likely the jockey wheels as others have said. You can drip or spray lube in them.
    As said the damage is done. I have had dry chains squeak. Little chirping birds that my riding buddies with undamaged ears could hear.

    I used to run a chain and cassette out together but I have switched to spending the money on more chain swaps. Wait for a smoking deal and buy a bunch of chains on the cheap. They don't go bad, become outdated, out of date or out of style. Stock up deep and change them as needed. I like the feel of a fresh chain that meshes well with good condition chain rings and cogs. Running a chain out past .5 kills the chain rings too and the big ring on my daily ride is not cheap. More chains = smoother overall and more consistent feel long term. Swapping out a chain is a couple of min procedure the second time you do it. Remove old chain, clean up the cog and rings with some degreaser, remove the proper number* of links from the new chain, thread it on, snap the master, wipe the excess lube off and done.
    From what I have seen once a chain starts to stretch it is an accelerating event. Destruction of the original bearing surfaces shows up as elongation. Rather than smooth machined surfaces sliding against each other with a film of hydrocarbons between them you have a rough plowed surface. Now the bearing surfaces are grinding rather than slipping. Lube reduces the friction but nothing like it was when new. I notice that a chain stays the same length for a while then starts to elongate at an increasing rate. The time between start of elongation and .75 is less than 1/3 the chain life. Based on this info I now change them out when they first start to elongate more than min measurable. Best feel and least damage to any other $ parts. Change one thing many times or many things less often.

    *You know this after writing it down inside the tool box lid the first time you did it. ie, 2 links for Tarmac. 4 for CADD-X.

  2. #12
    Steve O's Avatar
    Steve O is offline I spend all day thinking about bikes and talking to people on the internet about them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vicegrip View Post
    I have had dry chains squeak. Little chirping birds that my riding buddies with undamaged ears could hear.
    Proper chain maintenance is key.

  3. #13
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    According to Strava, Lord of the Mark ended up with a new chain and cassette. Any update on the squeaking?

  4. #14
    lordofthemark's Avatar
    lordofthemark is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judd View Post
    According to Strava, Lord of the Mark ended up with a new chain and cassette. Any update on the squeaking?
    The nice man at Phoenix said the squeaking was coming from the rear derailleur. As part of installing the chain and cassette, he lubed the derailleur and also adjusted the angle to match the new cassette.

    The squeaking is gone, and it seemed like the bike shifted and pedaled better than before.

    Another really great thing about Phoenix, he did not object to me watching him do all those steps and asking detailed questions, so I feel more likely to try changing the chain and cassette myself the next time I need to do so.

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