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Thread: Squeaking, chain, and related

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    lordofthemark's Avatar
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    Default Squeaking, chain, and related

    My chain (I think its the chain) has been very squeaky lately. Most when the cassette is on the smallest ring (highest gear) I finally took the time to lube the chain this weekend, and while that helped, it is still squeaking on the very highest cassette gear, and a little bit on the next highest.

    I also used the chain length tool and determined by chain is too stretched and needs to be replaced.

    I only lubed the chain itself, and did not apply lube directly to the rings. I also did not check anything else.

    Is it likely that the chain stretch is at fault, and I just need to replace the chain? Or is it likely I need to do something else?

    Am I doing damage to the cassette now? Can this wait for the weekend (I will not be commuting on Thursday or Friday, because Rosh Hashanah) ? I would prefer to take it to Phoenix, where I hope they would guide me through changing the chain myself. Or I might be able to bring it their Tuesday or Wednesday night.

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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    My chain (I think its the chain) has been very squeaky lately. Most when the cassette is on the smallest ring (highest gear) I finally took the time to lube the chain this weekend, and while that helped, it is still squeaking on the very highest cassette gear, and a little bit on the next highest.

    I also used the chain length tool and determined by chain is too stretched and needs to be replaced.

    I only lubed the chain itself, and did not apply lube directly to the rings. I also did not check anything else.

    Is it likely that the chain stretch is at fault, and I just need to replace the chain? Or is it likely I need to do something else?

    Am I doing damage to the cassette now? Can this wait for the weekend (I will not be commuting on Thursday or Friday, because Rosh Hashanah) ? I would prefer to take it to Phoenix, where I hope they would guide me through changing the chain myself. Or I might be able to bring it their Tuesday or Wednesday night.
    Squeaking is often the pulleys on the cassette, especially if you lubed the chain and it's still there.

    I usually lube the chain but cycle through all cogs and rings; the lube goes from the chain to the cogs and rings. Then I wipe off the excess.

    A worn chain does wear the cassette, but a couple of days isn't a big deal.

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    Quote Originally Posted by huskerdont View Post
    Squeaking is often the pulleys on the cassette, especially if you lubed the chain and it's still there.
    This. These are actually pretty easy to remove and clean, but spraying (I use spray lube, it's just easier...) or dribbling some lube in the center will generally do the trick.

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    Quote Originally Posted by huskerdont View Post
    Squeaking is often the pulleys on the derailleur...
    FTFY

    Lube never has to be on the outside surfaces of the chain, cogs, or chainrings. In fact, wet lube will attract more dirt and grit and could make things wear down faster. Lube should be focused on getting on the chain rollers, then like HD said, wipe off as much as possible (by grabbing loosely the chain with a rag and spinning the chain backwards). I usually keep wiping until I hardly see any more oil getting on the rag.

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    Quote Originally Posted by TwoWheelsDC View Post
    This. These are actually pretty easy to remove and clean, but spraying (I use spray lube, it's just easier...) or dribbling some lube in the center will generally do the trick.
    My problem with spray lube is that it's usually messier to apply than a drip bottle. This could leave to overspray onto rims, and on non-disc rear wheels, lead to failure to stop if the brake pads get contaminated. Don't ask me how I know

    If spray lube is the only thing available, I'll have a rag behind the chain to try to catch the spray from going all over the place.

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    TwoWheelsDC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by drevil View Post
    My problem with spray lube is that it's usually messier to apply than a drip bottle. This could leave to overspray onto rims, and on non-disc rear wheels, lead to failure to stop if the brake pads get contaminated. Don't ask me how I know

    If spray lube is the only thing available, I'll have a rag behind the chain to try to catch the spray from going all over the place.
    Yeah, I take special care to not spray any braking surfaces...but spray lube for me is so much faster. And I find spray works well as a cleaning solution for chains and moving parts...when applied liberally, it tends to break up gunk better than any drip lubes I've used.

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    Quote Originally Posted by drevil View Post
    FTFY

    Lube never has to be on the outside surfaces of the chain, cogs, or chainrings. In fact, wet lube will attract more dirt and grit and could make things wear down faster. Lube should be focused on getting on the chain rollers, then like HD said, wipe off as much as possible (by grabbing loosely the chain with a rag and spinning the chain backwards). I usually keep wiping until I hardly see any more oil getting on the rag.
    Oops, yeah, that. I was tempted to go back and fix it, but you've got the evidence of my mistake right there.

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    How "stretched" is the chain? If it's 0.75 or more, I wouldn't change it; the damage is done. (It's true that I don't think it makes economic sense to change chains at all, but will concede that you get maybe 10-15% more life out of a cassette if you change chains around 0.5. At least that is my experience.)

    But a stretched chain won't squeak.

    Most likely the jockey wheels as others have said. You can drip or spray lube in them.

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    I'd also add that I've only had temporary luck using lubricant on pulleys/jockey wheels. The squeaking seems to come back fairly quickly. However, I have had good luck removing them, disassembling, and greasing them in the axle area (not sure of the correct term for that area). I'll note that the fine mechanic at Bicycle Space once mentioned to me that he knew of nothing in the literature stating that that was a recommended service, but it has worked very well for me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by huskerdont View Post
    I'd also add that I've only had temporary luck using lubricant on pulleys/jockey wheels. The squeaking seems to come back fairly quickly. However, I have had good luck removing them, disassembling, and greasing them in the axle area (not sure of the correct term for that area). I'll note that the fine mechanic at Bicycle Space once mentioned to me that he knew of nothing in the literature stating that that was a recommended service, but it has worked very well for me.
    Related, but not
    https://imgur.com/a/Laiee

    (Not me, btw.)

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