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Thread: Bike Fit and Clipless Pedals

  1. #31
    Steve O's Avatar
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    The more times you ride up a hill, the smaller it gets. Until you don't even notice it sometimes. I've ridden the Custis probably 2000 times, and there are days I get home and I don't even recall going up the two sisters.

    That said, if you are stopping on the hills, try working on your shifting. Go to your lowest gear and climb the hill real slow with a steady cadence. Don't worry about your speed; focus on keeping your legs turning at a steady rate. Once it gets too easy (and eventually it will--except for 41st St.), shift up one gear.

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  3. 06-29-2017, 10:35 PM

    I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.


  4. #32
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    Another option - ride an Xtracycle with kids on the back all the time. You can borrow mine and my kids any time. Once you do that for a while, riding your regular bike will feel like cheating.

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  6. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sujiro View Post
    I'm tired of being passed by a lot, that's why I'm thinking if clipless pedals will help me to go faster. But now I'm scared to use the clipless because I'm afraid to fall.

    I also feel completely drained after uphills in custis trails after I pedalled up. Do you have any suggestion on this?
    Mostly just time on the bike and time on the hills, which you're doing. If I had a particularly troublesome hill (like 41st St at Chain Bridge), I would just go do hill repeats on it. If you do half a dozen of them, just doing one on the way home becomes a bit easier.

    Regarding being passed, no matter how fast you go or fit you are, there will always be people faster and people who will pass you. I just decided at some point that if I compared myself to others, I'd always think poorly of myself, so I try not to.

    The falling with clipless pedals, while not fun, is the easiest falling you can do on a bike. You're usually stopped or very close to it, so you just sort of tonk over sideways. I usually just fell on the meat of my shoulder and had no problem. Harmless enough, provided you don't fall on a curb or into traffic, of course. Not that I'm recommending falling, but it's better than a 20 mph wreck.

    ETA that I had missed a couple of posts in the thread. If the clipless pedals make you nervous, yeah, maybe try the flat pedals with pins that some are recommending. No reason to add worry to your riding for a minimal benefit.
    Last edited by huskerdont; 06-30-2017 at 08:28 AM.

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  8. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jrenaut View Post
    Another option - ride an Xtracycle with kids on the back all the time. You can borrow mine and my kids any time. Once you do that for a while, riding your regular bike will feel like cheating.
    Or, if you're concerned about riding a different bike/being responsible for someone's kids - just hook a trailer on with some weight (or groceries if you want to be productive) and call it "resistance training." I always enjoy that first bit when I'm riding solo and I've disconnected the trailercycle.

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  10. #35
    mstone is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
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    For people looking for combo flat/spd pedals I'll put in my usual plug for the Shimano PD-T780. https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-clipl.../dp/B00TJ2AVJ0 I find the wider platform more comfortable than the A530s when riding the flat side, they're built to a higher spec, and all bikes should have reflectors on the pedals if ridden at night.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mstone View Post
    For people looking for combo flat/spd pedals I'll put in my usual plug for the Shimano PD-T780. https://www.amazon.com/Shimano-clipl.../dp/B00TJ2AVJ0 I find the wider platform more comfortable than the A530s when riding the flat side, they're built to a higher spec, and all bikes should have reflectors on the pedals if ridden at night.
    I was looking at those once upon a time (in case I ever move on from my large platforms with pins). Are those the earlier version of the PD-T8000 pedals?

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    I like these a lot for MTB. But I don't think they make them any longer.


  13. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by LhasaCM View Post
    I was looking at those once upon a time (in case I ever move on from my large platforms with pins). Are those the earlier version of the PD-T8000 pedals?
    Good catch, looks like Shimano updated them. Maybe I need new pedals (and a new bike to put them on?)

  14. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by n18 View Post
    Could you post your height and weight?

    Without a bike fit, try adjusting seat height, one inch or 3/4 at a time, then measure the time it takes a certain segment. Preferably a segment that is a slow steady uphill. I found that by raising the seat, I got more efficient, up until a certain point, then efficiency drops. So that would be the sweet spot. Also, if you consistently find yourself sliding forward on your seat after cycling for a while, then slide your seat forward. This is assuming that the seat was level to begin with.
    I'm 5'4, 153 lbs.

  15. #40
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    I just switched out my clipless speedplay frogs for flats. The difference is tremendous.

    First - if you concerned about falling - you can generally adjust the clipless pedals to make them easy to unclip. SPDs you can adjust the tension., Speedplay frogs (which I love) have no tension and are so easy to get out of (they also have the most float, which is good for knees).

    Will clippless make you faster. I will disagree with some here and say YES clipless will make you faster. It is hard to quantify and I remember when I made my decision to switch - I struggled to find anything that resembled sound empirical evidence. That said, I think you can assume you will gain a gear. A big reason is efficiency. Your pedal is always clipped to your shoe on the downstroke and upstroke. But to me, more importantly, your foot is always in the right position. Hit a bump? Doesnt matter, your foot is always in the correct position. No fumbling. Also, while you could wear a stiff - I dont know - boot - with flats - clipless pedals go with stiff (at your preference) shoes which will transfer all your power into the crank. You gain a lot of efficiency by having that foot fixed to the pedal.

    Using flats my foot is bouncing all of the place. I am spending a lot of time repositioning. And in the wrong moment, my foot is now in the wrong position, flexing and not transferring full power into the crank.

    Another big difference is control of the bike. With clipless, you have four points of firm control of the bike - two hands, two feet. Clipped to the pedals, you can control the movement and balance of the bike. Hit a bump, and your bike will move with your feet - when you land - your bike will still be under you. With flats, its up to your hands. And your feet can do is pedal. But they dont contribute to control.

    Flats with pins are pretty cool. I prefer my speedplay frogs more than anything for the additional control of the bike they give me.

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