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Thread: Nearly Rear Ended on MVT Next to National

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    Default Nearly Rear Ended on MVT Next to National

    Riding southbound on the MVT next to National on the corridor just south of Gravelly Point Park where there's fencing on one side and the GW Parkway exposed on the other. I had to slow down quickly as a pedestrian was walking in front of me, and I chose not to pass when I saw a bike coming around the corner. This is the part where there are short sight lines and the trail is not that wide. The woman behind me nearly rear ended me (her handlebars ended up brushing my leg) and ended up going down in the middle of the trail. The guy who was on-coming hit her at low speed and tipped over. Fortunately no one was hurt and the other rider was able to get her bike working to get her back on the road. The woman mentioned that she was probably following too close to me.

    It's a good lessons learned to maintain safe following distances, especially on an MUP

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    And also be sure to signal as most bikes do not have brake lights.

    Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by zsionakides View Post
    Riding southbound on the MVT next to National on the corridor just south of Gravelly Point Park where there's fencing on one side and the GW Parkway exposed on the other. I had to slow down quickly as a pedestrian was walking in front of me, and I chose not to pass when I saw a bike coming around the corner. This is the part where there are short sight lines and the trail is not that wide. The woman behind me nearly rear ended me (her handlebars ended up brushing my leg) and ended up going down in the middle of the trail. The guy who was on-coming hit her at low speed and tipped over. Fortunately no one was hurt and the other rider was able to get her bike working to get her back on the road. The woman mentioned that she was probably following too close to me.

    It's a good lessons learned to maintain safe following distances, especially on an MUP
    Glad to hear it wasn't as bad as it could've been. My rule of thumb is to maintain a following distance of a few bike lengths and focus on what's in front of the rider in front of me. That way, you're responding to obstacles at the same time as the rider you're following (much of the time even before they do). Most riders, unfortunately, only focus on what's directly in front of their front wheel and then you get a repeat of the type of incident in which you were a victim.

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    Quote Originally Posted by f148vr View Post
    And also be sure to signal as most bikes do not have brake lights.

    Sent from my XT1575 using Tapatalk
    If you can safely. A sudden stop using both brakes (and therefore both hands) or an uneven surface or a steep downhill could make signalling an unsafe activity.

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    Quote Originally Posted by huskerdont View Post
    If you can safely. A sudden stop using both brakes (and therefore both hands) or an uneven surface or a steep downhill could make signalling an unsafe activity.
    I used both brakes in that area to slow more quickly. That's also the section of the MVT that has no barrier between it and the GW Parkway, so I prefer to keep both hands on the bike for safe handling in that corridor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zsionakides View Post
    I used both brakes in that area to slow more quickly. That's also the section of the MVT that has no barrier between it and the GW Parkway, so I prefer to keep both hands on the bike for safe handling in that corridor.
    This crash was totally not your fault, but as an alternate to signaling your actions, loudly proclaiming "SLOWING" or "STOPPING" can help. Might not save you from everything--especially if the GW Parkway and airport are also making a ton of noise, but it can help. During most of my ride on the MVT I also wont take my hands of the brakes due to the poor sight lines. But if I know someone is close behind me I try to call my actions out if they might be unexpected.

    I'm glad you're ok. Crashes aren't fun, even when you don't get hurt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by zsionakides View Post
    I used both brakes in that area to slow more quickly. That's also the section of the MVT that has no barrier between it and the GW Parkway, so I prefer to keep both hands on the bike for safe handling in that corridor.
    I almost always give a slow or stopping call when I have to get hard on the brakes. I hate doing it around peds though because it freaks them out which makes it harder to predict their movements. I also don't like that it seems to sometimes make them step off of the trail if I call out "slowing" behind them, since they have as much right to the trail as me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Emm View Post
    This crash was totally not your fault, but as an alternate to signaling your actions, loudly proclaiming "SLOWING" or "STOPPING" can help.
    This is something I do, if I'm riding with others or I know someone is directly behind me.

    I didn't actually realize the woman was close behind me, and I usually I make checks every couple hundred yards, when I can, to get a sense of my surroundings if I can't hear others.

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    [QUOTE=Judd;161747]I almost always give a slow or stopping call when I have to get hard on the brakes. I hate doing it around peds though because it freaks them out which makes it harder to predict their movements. I also don't like that it seems to sometimes make them step off of the trail if I call out "slowing" behind them, since they have as much right to the trail as me.[/QUOTEI]

    I think a loud bell is the best weapon against peds. It can provide some hint as to what they might do and how to react. As the saying goes, bell, don't leave home without it. Given that vast majority(75-80%) of braking is done by the front brakes, I'd argue that it is safer to signal and warn those behind than to be concerned about using both brakes.

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    Thanks for sharing and glad it was not worse.

    I have to say that the last time I rode through that very section, a cyclist decided to plow through a tight area to pass a long line of cyclists and other cyclists very vocally let him know that his decision was a poor one. I could have done with a bit less profanity, but I agree that something needed to be said.

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