Page 2 of 5 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 44

Thread: Tuesday Tidbits - Biking-Related Factoids & History in the DC Area

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Arlington
    Posts
    1,750
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve O View Post
    Now that's a real person to name a trail after, not Wayne f'in' Anderson.
    Dislike. Wayne F Anderson has a bikeway because Wayne F Anderson worked to have a bikeway built. Ain't no bike trail to the North Pole.

  2. Likes ginacico, lordofthemark liked this post
  3. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    The forgotten corner of Alexandria, VA
    Posts
    2,378
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve O View Post
    Now that's a real person to name a trail after, not Wayne f'in' Anderson.

    Please don't diss great Alexandrians. Next thing, you will be attacking the memory of Frank Mann. Or Lawrence Hooff. Or Baron Cameron (who wasn't an Alexandrian? was he? but still)

  4. Likes Steve O, Judd liked this post
  5. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Tukwila, WA
    Posts
    1,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Wayne Frederick Anderson - A Forgotten Name

    Based on recent posts, I felt like I needed to share information on the tidbit that inspired my Tuesday Tidbit series (many thanks to ginacio whose curiosity was the origin of said inspiration!), the Wayne F Anderson Trail.

    At the NE corner of Army-Navy Dr and South Joyce Streets, one can find a Bike Route sign with an interesting name on it, the Anderson Trail.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	andersonTrail - 1.jpg 
Views:	35 
Size:	91.3 KB 
ID:	15126

    In fact, the trail running from the corner of South Glebe Rd and West Glebe Rd to Mount Vernon Avenue across Four Mile Run and along the Alexandria side of the stream to US-1 is named the Wayne F Anderson Bikeway. Other signs such as those at the north end of Commonwealth Avenue state this, too. But who is this Wayne F. Anderson?
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	WayneFrederickAndersonBikeway_signs.jpg 
Views:	33 
Size:	102.0 KB 
ID:	15127Click image for larger version. 

Name:	stravaSegment.jpg 
Views:	37 
Size:	54.3 KB 
ID:	15128

    Born in 1925, Wayne Frederick Anderson was a native of Moline, Illinois and served in the Army during World War II. In the 1960's, he spent 8 years as city manager of Evanston, Illinois, before moving to Alexandria, Virginia, to become its city manager. Here is an article written about him in the Chicago Tribune about this move:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	chicagoTribuneArticle.jpg 
Views:	33 
Size:	98.1 KB 
ID:	15129

    This is taken from an article in the Washington Post written about him when he died in 2003: "As Alexandria city manager (1970-1974), Mr. Anderson worked to balance land development pressures with quality-of-life concerns. He also worked to improve relations with the city's black population, reorganized government departments and helped develop plans to revive neglected schools, neighborhoods and business districts."

    He also taught public administration at George Mason University from 1984-1993. He was honored in 1989 with the Alexandria Chamber of Commerce's George Washington Leadership award, an annual award given to outstanding community activists for their efforts to improve Alexandria.

    Though his name has been mostly forgotten over time, perhaps by knowing his efforts we can remember his legacy better by promoting use of the Wayne F. Anderson Bikeway name as it passes through Four Mile Run Park in Alexandria, at least.

  6. #14
    Steve O's Avatar
    Steve O is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Dominion Hills in Arlington VA
    Posts
    3,550
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bobco85 View Post
    Though his name has been mostly forgotten over time, perhaps by knowing his efforts we can remember his legacy better by promoting use of the Wayne F. Anderson Bikeway name as it passes through Four Mile Run Park in Alexandria, at least.
    Or not.

  7. Dislikes Judd disliked this post
  8. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Arlington
    Posts
    1,750
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bobco85 View Post

    Born in 1925, Wayne Frederick Anderson was a native of Moline, Illinois...
    This part alone deserves our admiration.

  9. #16
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    alexandria
    Posts
    305
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve O View Post
    Now that's a real person to name a trail after, not Wayne f'in' Anderson.
    I wish I were in a place that required such a parka...right about now

    Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

  10. #17
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Mostly Frankfurt am Main with time in Dominion Hills
    Posts
    4,867
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bobco85 View Post
    Based on recent posts, I felt like I needed to share information on the tidbit that inspired my Tuesday Tidbit series (many thanks to ginacio whose curiosity was the origin of said inspiration!), the Wayne F Anderson Trail.

    At the NE corner of Army-Navy Dr and South Joyce Streets, one can find a Bike Route sign with an interesting name on it, the Anderson Trail.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	andersonTrail - 1.jpg 
Views:	35 
Size:	91.3 KB 
ID:	15126

    In fact, the trail running from the corner of South Glebe Rd and West Glebe Rd to Mount Vernon Avenue across Four Mile Run and along the Alexandria side of the stream to US-1 is named the Wayne F Anderson Bikeway. Other signs such as those at the north end of Commonwealth Avenue state this, too. But who is this Wayne F. Anderson?
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	WayneFrederickAndersonBikeway_signs.jpg 
Views:	33 
Size:	102.0 KB 
ID:	15127Click image for larger version. 

Name:	stravaSegment.jpg 
Views:	37 
Size:	54.3 KB 
ID:	15128

    Born in 1925, Wayne Frederick Anderson was a native of Moline, Illinois and served in the Army during World War II. In the 1960's, he spent 8 years as city manager of Evanston, Illinois, before moving to Alexandria, Virginia, to become its city manager. Here is an article written about him in the Chicago Tribune about this move:
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	chicagoTribuneArticle.jpg 
Views:	33 
Size:	98.1 KB 
ID:	15129

    This is taken from an article in the Washington Post written about him when he died in 2003: "As Alexandria city manager (1970-1974), Mr. Anderson worked to balance land development pressures with quality-of-life concerns. He also worked to improve relations with the city's black population, reorganized government departments and helped develop plans to revive neglected schools, neighborhoods and business districts."

    He also taught public administration at George Mason University from 1984-1993. He was honored in 1989 with the Alexandria Chamber of Commerce's George Washington Leadership award, an annual award given to outstanding community activists for their efforts to improve Alexandria.

    Though his name has been mostly forgotten over time, perhaps by knowing his efforts we can remember his legacy better by promoting use of the Wayne F. Anderson Bikeway name as it passes through Four Mile Run Park in Alexandria, at least.
    I seem to remember that during his tenure as Evanston City Manager, Evanston eliminated their public bus system. They used to run a special route through my neighborhood in the morning that went to the high school (ETHS) since there was no separate school bus service. Eventually Evanston was incorporated into the CTA bus system.

  11. Likes bobco85 liked this post
  12. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Tukwila, WA
    Posts
    1,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Oxon Hill - Yoke's on You!

    This is a shorter one since it focuses on a minor aspect, but I found it interesting nonetheless.

    Across the Potomac River from Alexandria sits a hill known as Oxon Hill that can be accessed via the Woodrow Wilson Bridge Trail next to National Harbor, but something isn't quite right with the name. You see, the plural of the word "ox" is "oxen," not "oxon," so what's up?
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	oxonHillMap1861.jpg 
Views:	29 
Size:	89.9 KB 
ID:	15177

    Turns out, Oxon has nothing to do with the animal (ox/oxen), and it comes from a plantation that Thomas Addison owned long ago.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	thomasAddison.jpg 
Views:	26 
Size:	96.8 KB 
ID:	15176

    Thomas Addison built a 2 story house in 1710 on the foundation of his father's house. It was originally called Addison Plantation before later being called Oxon Hill Manor. A sidenote that is also interesting: there are many current Maryland resident descendants of slaves that were kept at Addison Plantation who still have the last name Addison.

    The word "Oxon" is an abbreviation of the word Oxoniesis which is Latin for "of Oxford." Members of the Addison family attended Oxford University in England.

    One last thing, there are actually 2 Oxon Hill Manors! The original one owned by the Addisons was destroyed in a fire in 1895 and was located near where current day Monument Ave crosses over an on-ramp to the Beltway on the north side of the MGM casino. Sadly, the developers did not care to preserve any part of the original house, and only a part of the cemetery remains. The current Oxon Hill Manor was built in 1928 and has nothing to do with the Addison family.

    It's certainly something interesting to think about the next time you find yourself climbing Oxon Hill!

  13. Likes anomad liked this post
  14. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Tukwila, WA
    Posts
    1,970
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Jackson City - Lost at Long Bridge

    At probably the most exciting stop (to me) on my recent Arlington Historical Bike Ride lies a town long forgotten that's along one of the most popular stretches of the Mount Vernon Trail, one that almost every single person on this forum has ridden by at least once in their lives.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	jacksonCity_Large2017.jpg 
Views:	55 
Size:	89.8 KB 
ID:	15240

    In the 19th Century, a group of speculators from New York came to Washington and proposed a new industrial city that would be built on the Virginia side of Long Bridge.

    On January 11, 1836, President Andrew Jackson (came across Long Bridge), George Washington Parke Custis (came from his mansion, Arlington House), and as many as 10,000 people gathered and set the ceremonial cornerstone in place for Jackson City.

    This map (full version: https://www.loc.gov/item/99439186/) is from May 31, 1861. Interesting things on the map: Governor Lee's Arlington House, Arlington Springs, Ross House (William & Carolyn Ross who founded Rosslyn), and Roach's House on Prospect Hill (north end of Arlington Ridge Rd).
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	jacksonCity_Large1861.jpg 
Views:	65 
Size:	104.3 KB 
ID:	15241

    After the American Civil War, Jackson City wasn't doing too well. Investors from New Jersey came to town and tried their hand at making it into a gambling resort. It was called the "Monte Carlo of America" and had saloons, gambling houses, bordellos, vice dens, and a race track. This map (full version: https://www.loc.gov/item/89692758/) is from 1900 (with zoomed in version):
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	jacksonCity_Large1900.jpg 
Views:	53 
Size:	98.1 KB 
ID:	15242Click image for larger version. 

Name:	jacksonCity_Small1900.jpg 
Views:	53 
Size:	91.2 KB 
ID:	15243

    Not everyone liked having a gambling resort nearby (Rosslyn also had a bad reputation for being seedy), and things were about to change. Virginia Commonwealth Attorney Crandal Mackey and a group of civic crusaders called the Good Citizens' League (included Frank Lyon, founder of Lyon Village) conducted a series of raids on Jackson City over the course of a few years. Their final raid in 1904 burnt down much of Jackson City. And people think NIMBY's are bad nowadays!

    The remnants of Jackson City became an industrial area (brickyards, warehouses, iron-fabricating factories, junk lots, look at some of the land owners in the 1900 map for more details) up until the 1960's. The area where the town used to stand was completely covered over when the GW Parkway and I-395 were successively built.

    No remnants were preserved, and no historical markers were erected, but hopefully folks who enjoy the Mount Vernon Trail will keep it in mind the next time they pass through on their way to/from the 14th Street Bridge.

  15. Likes Starduster, scoot, dasgeh, ginacico, Steve O and 2 others liked this post
  16. #20
    dasgeh's Avatar
    dasgeh is offline Queen of Family Biking & All Things Kidical
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Posts
    5,092
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    These are so cool. Thank you!

    Quote Originally Posted by bobco85 View Post
    This map (full version: https://www.loc.gov/item/99439186/) is from May 31, 1861. Interesting things on the map: Governor Lee's Arlington House, Arlington Springs, Ross House (William & Carolyn Ross who founded Rosslyn), and Roach's House on Prospect Hill (north end of Arlington Ridge Rd).
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	jacksonCity_Large1861.jpg 
Views:	65 
Size:	104.3 KB 
ID:	15241
    Also interesting: the "toll gate". Would love to know the history of tolls in the area, and whether there is precedent for a congestion charge.

  17. Likes Judd, bobco85 liked this post

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •