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Thread: Disc Brakes -- Hydraulic vs. Mechanical?

  1. #71
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    FWIW, Tektro Lyra brakes have a reputation for being pretty bad brakes. It would probably save you some hassle in the future if you replace them (when they next fail or you reach a breaking point) with something better. There's no comparison to hydraulic, but that is an expensive proposition with the integrated brake/shift levers. In the meantime, my recommendation would be TRP Hy/Rd which are a hybrid system (you can keep your existing levers) will auto adjust for pad wear and will stop you better than other pure mechanicals -- and probably especially better than the Lyras. Or if you want to save a bit of money you could get a set of Juin Tech R1 or Yokozuna Motoko (also hybrid system, but not quite as nice since you have a screw for adjusting for pad wear) for around $150-175. I definitely wouldn't pay money for another Tektro Lyra caliper!

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    Thanks Hozn. But $150 to 175... sure seems pretty high. Not as high as some car repair but still... and that's not including labor, though maybe I could figure it out myself.

    We'll see how the next bunch of miles go. Still, it's hard to believe that after only 18 months of riding regularly, a major part needs to be replaced.
    Of course, I suppose, an experienced person wouldn't have left the shop with these brakes on the initial purchase.

    I'll start saving my pennies!


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    Quote Originally Posted by streetsmarts View Post
    Thanks Hozn. But $150 to 175... sure seems pretty high. Not as high as some car repair but still... and that's not including labor, though maybe I could figure it out myself.

    We'll see how the next bunch of miles go. Still, it's hard to believe that after only 18 months of riding regularly, a major part needs to be replaced.
    Of course, I suppose, an experienced person wouldn't have left the shop with these brakes on the initial purchase.
    I think your first instinct was right: they're not the best brakes in the world, but they're perfectly serviceable. You do need to adjust them more than self-centering brakes, but but if you can do that they'll work fine for years.

    (I assume you've learned at this point that there's two adjustments: a hex bolt to adjust the fixed pad, and a barrel adjuster+hex screw to adjust the cable on the moving pad. I'll typically tighten the fixed pad until it starts to contact the brake rotor--you can hear it when the wheel is spinning--then back off a quarter turn. The moving pad is adjusted based on the movement of the brake lever--you don't want the lever to bottom out on the bar, so there should be some space between lever and bar when it's pushed all the way tight.)

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    Quote Originally Posted by mstone View Post
    I think your first instinct was right: they're not the best brakes in the world, but they're perfectly serviceable. You do need to adjust them more than self-centering brakes, but but if you can do that they'll work fine for years.

    (I assume you've learned at this point that there's two adjustments: a hex bolt to adjust the fixed pad, and a barrel adjuster+hex screw to adjust the cable on the moving pad. I'll typically tighten the fixed pad until it starts to contact the brake rotor--you can hear it when the wheel is spinning--then back off a quarter turn. The moving pad is adjusted based on the movement of the brake lever--you don't want the lever to bottom out on the bar, so there should be some space between lever and bar when it's pushed all the way tight.)
    Yes yes , thank you! I'm learning. Also, I added a rack when I bought it (LBS installed), and so the barrel adjuster was nearly impossible to adjust due to closeness of ...other metal parts for rack support. The mechanic today added an inline barrel adjuster so I can use that.


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    Quote Originally Posted by streetsmarts View Post
    We'll see how the next bunch of miles go. Still, it's hard to believe that after only 18 months of riding regularly, a major part needs to be replaced.
    If it makes you feel better, the headset of my Jamis Renegade rusted out in the first two months of ownership, was overhauled, and rusted out again 2 months later..... I've also struggled with the rear hub on the stock wheels of the Jamis Renegade, so I really can't speak much to the quality of components they ship their bikes with...... Amazing bike though that I'm quite happy with now that I have a quality headset and rear wheel.

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    Quote Originally Posted by streetsmarts View Post
    Thanks Hozn. But $150 to 175... sure seems pretty high. Not as high as some car repair but still... and that's not including labor, though maybe I could figure it out myself.

    We'll see how the next bunch of miles go. Still, it's hard to believe that after only 18 months of riding regularly, a major part needs to be replaced.
    Of course, I suppose, an experienced person wouldn't have left the shop with these brakes on the initial purchase.

    I'll start saving my pennies!
    Heh, I guess it's all relative. To me replacing a major part after 18 months (or even 12 months) sounds reasonable. But in mileage terms, I'd think you should be getting at least 3,000 miles out of your pads and I'd hope you'd be getting over 15k miles of the calipers before things start falling apart (ideally much more than that). If you're not getting a few thousand miles out of pads, you probably want to buy a different brand next time (e.g. Kool Stop and Jagwire probably make some compatible pads -- and they probably cost less too.)

    I'm sure mstone is right and that with proper adjustment these will last forever, even if the single-sided adjustment is more fiddly than dual-sided.

    (You could also get a set of TRP Spyres that are the more expensive siblings to the brakes you have and pull from both sides. I don't personally think there would be enough difference in performance to warrant the upgrade, but it does greatly simplify adjustment -- just turn barrel adjust to bring in pads as they wear; eventually you also need to dial in the pads from each side with a 3mm hex.)

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    Well, that's not good at all! Curious - did you have to pay to replace the headset and rear wheel, or did the bike shop or Jamis pay to replace with quality parts?

    And I've heard so many good things about Renegades, I'm surprised!
    However, most of my friends who have them, have the models with better components, I think.

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    Thanks Hozn. Learning as I go.

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    Quote Originally Posted by streetsmarts View Post
    But in mileage terms, I'd think you should be getting at least 3,000 miles out of your pads and I'd hope you'd be getting over 15k miles of the calipers before things start falling apart (ideally much more than that).
    Second on these estimates.

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    Quote Originally Posted by streetsmarts View Post
    Well, that's not good at all! Curious - did you have to pay to replace the headset and rear wheel, or did the bike shop or Jamis pay to replace with quality parts?

    And I've heard so many good things about Renegades, I'm surprised!
    However, most of my friends who have them, have the models with better components, I think.
    I don't know if there was ever resolution with Jamis, but my LBS has helped me out some. I didn't replace like with like though - I made some significant upgrades from stock parts to DT Swiss wheels and Cane Creek headset.

    I will caveat that I'm generally not all that easy on bike components. I've also managed to mangle the hub of a Shimano RS010 wheel and generally only get about 1200-1500 miles out of a chain

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