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Thread: My visit to Conte's

  1. #21
    lordofthemark's Avatar
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    Okay I think the brake pads are okay for now, playing with them a bit. Name:  20170510_192215.jpg
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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by anomad View Post
    +1

    I should invent a motorcycle style chain oiler for my regular commuter.
    http://www.cyclingweekly.com/news/pr...-faster-188314

  3. #23
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    Plenty of life left in those pads.

    Park Tool has a whole playlist about chains on FaceTube. Literally everything you need to know, just have to practice.

    https://youtu.be/vSLnA14hKkI?list=PL...IJSQygRL8sv0eh

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    The older I get the more I am sure I have never had a single original thought...

    Anyhoo, I once saw a video about a winning trials bike set up, which are pretty serious little machines and obviously very concerned about light weight. They ran standard chain without o-rings for moar power and a nifty little "homemade" chain oiler tucked up by the rear shock. A bit of tubing and a 15ml bottle should lube a bicycle chain for many miles. Just need a flow control so it doesn't drip on the floor.

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  6. #25
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    Okay, brakes checked, tube patched, bike partially cleaned. That's enough maintenance for now. More cleaning, lubing the chain, checking the chain length, and maybe checking the cables, for a later day (this weekend?)

    (I am pretty sure the last time I patched a tube it was schrader instead of a presta, and front wheel instead of rear, both of which made things easier) (Also I seem to have lost the little nut that the presta has - do I need that? I left the schrader adapter on)
    Last edited by lordofthemark; 05-11-2017 at 10:42 AM. Reason: A newb friendly bike tube, not a child playing Beethoven

  7. #26
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    There's plenty of life left in those brake pads. The bike I'm riding to work tomorrow morning has far less material.

    Since you asked about a parts washer - I have an ultrasonic cleaner and clean some of my parts in it, some of the time. Before I got my ultrasonic cleaner, I made a poor man's sonic cleaner by placing my parts in an old powdered gatorade tub, filling it with cleaner or solvent, and put it on the washing machine during a wash cycle. Anyway, I use the parts washer when I'm doing a complete overhaul of something like a hub or rear DR. The chain on my commuter bike used to get filthy because my old commuting route seemed to have a lot of sand, so every now and then I'd run it through the cleaner. The ultrasonic cleaner does do a good job of getting it real clean. I might've put a cassette in the washer a couple of times, but a cassette is probably easier to clean while on the wheel by flossing it with an old rag.

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by lordofthemark View Post
    Okay, brakes checked, tube patched, bike partially cleaned. That's enough maintenance for now. More cleaning, lubing the chain, checking the chain length, and maybe checking the cables, for a later day (this weekend?)

    (I am pretty sure the last time I patched a tube it was schroder instead of a presta, and front wheel instead of rear, both of which made things easier) (Also I seem to have lost the little nut that the presta has - do I need that? I left the schroder adapter on)
    You don't need the presta nut.

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  10. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Judd View Post
    Of course there's outliers like Komorebi who I believe has like 13-14k on her current cassette, because she has some kind of wizard bike.
    I don't know about the wizard bike, but the 13-14k part is true. I'm on my fourth or fifth chain, but still using the original cassette and chainrings. A couple of contributing factors:

    -- At least half of that distance is my commute, which is so flat that I usually don't bother to shift gears.
    -- I'm a teensy-weensy bit compulsive about cleaning my chain. The chain generally gets cleaned and relubed after 200 miles or every rainy ride, whichever comes first.

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    Quote Originally Posted by komorebi View Post
    I don't know about the wizard bike, but the 13-14k part is true. I'm on my fourth or fifth chain, but still using the original cassette and chainrings. A couple of contributing factors:

    -- At least half of that distance is my commute, which is so flat that I usually don't bother to shift gears.
    -- I'm a teensy-weensy bit compulsive about cleaning my chain. The chain generally gets cleaned and relubed after 200 miles or every rainy ride, whichever comes first.
    I used to use a chain cleaner every couple hundred miles or so, but eased up on that compulsion and save it for when I can still "hear" my dirty chain after a more pedestrian cleaning. Now my cleaning routine is to check my chain, cassette and jockey wheel for obvious crud and give those a good brush and wipe. I picked up a pack of gear floss and it's great for getting caked-on grime off of a cassette (https://smile.amazon.com/Finish-Line.../dp/B004JKK75A).

    I agree about wiping the chain down and relubing after a wet day. It's amazing how quickly surface rust can form on a chain that's been through a day of rain.

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    Quote Originally Posted by komorebi View Post

    -- At least half of that distance is my commute, which is so flat that I usually don't bother to shift gears.
    Sounds like you're ready for a fixie.

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