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Thread: Bike Shed Recommendation Needed

  1. #11
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    Yes, I believe it is 1 or 2 feet

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcannon100 View Post
    My reading on page 3 is that as long as it's an interior lot and the shed is not two stories, Hozn is not going to prison. Appears to be a 1 foot setback requirement.

    It's driving me crazy that the drawings are nowhere close to scale.

  3. #13
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    hozn is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
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    Yay! Freedom!

    (Ours might be 2 feet, but it is pretty close to property line. We were told that was to county code.)

    Sent from my LEX727 using Tapatalk

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcannon100 View Post
    This is Vicegrips idea of a "shed"

    You say that like it is a bad thing......

    Not "organic" enough for me. Kind of like trying to work with new overalls on. You just can't get anything done until you stop trying to stay clean.

    FFC has the same sort of no permit, short setback rules regarding sheds as Arl. If you are handy building one from scratch is a little bit cheaper than buying a pre-made or kit. Be sure to stay in the four foot by eight foot world. Staying with dimensions that work with standard sheet plywood and eight foot 2X4s Makes things easier and keeps the scrap down to a min. An 7X13 footprint is tough but a 8X12 works well with stock lumber.

    For pricing. Basic materials list for a 8X12 shed with a 8 foot roof in front and lean too type roof. Very easy to build with basic tools of a circular saw, tape measure, hammer, box knife and no hard angles to figure or cut.

    Floor is 3 sheets of 3/4 plywood (2) 2x6x12 (10) 2x6x8
    Back wall is 7'x12'. 3 sheets of T-111 (2) 2x4x12 (7) 2x4x8 Save the drops for shelving inside.
    Two side walls. Each is 2 sheet T-111 (7) 2x4
    Two front walls* Each made from one sheet T-111 and (4) 2x4.
    4 foot door. One sheet T-111 and (4) 2x4.
    Roof (12) 2x4x12 and 4 sheets of CDX sheathing and (2) 3/4x10x12 pre-painted wood for trim around the edges of the roof.
    Roof is 144 SF. You will need 2 pounds of nails 5 bundles of shingles and one small roll of tar paper and a roll of screen to cover the underside of the eaves.
    Nails, paint, hinges and lock for the door and what ever foundation is called for depending on the location of the shed. Can add 3/4x4 trim wood on the corners and around the door for looks.
    Last edited by Vicegrip; 02-28-2017 at 01:02 PM.

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  6. #15
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    Thanks all!

  7. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vicegrip View Post
    You say that like it is a bad thing......

    Not "organic" enough for me. Kind of like trying to work with new overalls on. You just can't get anything done until you stop trying to stay clean.

    FFC has the same sort of no permit, short setback rules regarding sheds as Arl. If you are handy building one from scratch is a little bit cheaper than buying a pre-made or kit. Be sure to stay in the four foot by eight foot world. Staying with dimensions that work with standard sheet plywood and eight foot 2X4s Makes things easier and keeps the scrap down to a min. An 7X13 footprint is tough but a 8X12 works well with stock lumber.

    For pricing. Basic materials list for a 8X12 shed with a 8 foot roof in front and lean too type roof. Very easy to build with basic tools of a circular saw, tape measure, hammer, box knife and no hard angles to figure or cut.

    Floor is 3 sheets of 3/4 plywood (2) 2x6x12 (10) 2x6x8
    Back wall is 7'x12'. 3 sheets of T-111 (2) 2x4x12 (7) 2x4x8 Save the drops for shelving inside.
    Two side walls. Each is 2 sheet T-111 (7) 2x4
    Two front walls* Each made from one sheet T-111 and (4) 2x4.
    4 foot door. One sheet T-111 and (4) 2x4.
    Roof (12) 2x4x12 and 4 sheets of CDX sheathing and (2) 3/4x10x12 pre-painted wood for trim around the edges of the roof.
    Roof is 144 SF. You will need 2 pounds of nails 5 bundles of shingles and one small roll of tar paper and a roll of screen to cover the underside of the eaves.
    Nails, paint, hinges and lock for the door and what ever foundation is called for depending on the location of the shed. Can add 3/4x4 trim wood on the corners and around the door for looks.
    I'd maybe add 3 4x4's to put the shed on skids so you have the option to move it more easily.

  8. #17
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    That would work if the ground/site is fairly close to level. You just dig some shallow trenches, fill with gravel, and put the skids on top. If the ground is not level, you'll need to do something else. The plans I got from icreatables included various foundation plans for such situations.

    FWIW, my small yard is close to level so I used two 6x6s. After laying them parallel, I placed a STRAIGHT 2x4 across the skids in various places and directions, and used a long spirit level to see where I need to add more gravel, dirt, etc.

  9. #18
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    Be sure to have some form of tie downs of not anchored in some other manner. Bikes don't add much mass* and an 8'X16' wall has a good wind signature. Some locations have little wind exposure but others would need added hold downs.

    *Well most bikes. A shed with a collection of early 1970s Iverson Grand Sport 10 speeds and a medium size families worth of Wallmart bikes would likely have enough mass to gather up its own moon.

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