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Thread: Travel Bike Wishlist

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by vvill View Post
    Anyone familiar with or used either of these before? They're both "custom" made bags for bikes that require a bit more assembly - fork removal (and probably won't fit larger frames, 29ers, etc.).

    http://www.gavilanbff.com/
    https://orucase.com/
    I hadn't seen those, specifically, but they look interesting.

    Peter has the Backpack Case and I have Co-Motion's Co-Pilot Travel Case.

    Both are roughly 26x26x10, just inside the airline regulation limits. They accommodate 700c wheels (must deflate the tires) but don't require removing the fork. Conveniently, the soft case fits inside the other one, which comes in handy when we're traveling with two bikes or the tandem, because we can pre-ship or store them as one case.

    Anecdotally, we both really appreciate that the Co-Motion case has a telescoping handle and wheels. Backpack styles work okay, but the reality of lugging around a bulky case on your back gets old pretty fast.

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  3. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by hozn View Post
    Maybe if I had a quick release! I would need that for 12mm thru-axle. I don't think this exists, but I'd be happy to be wrong.
    https://jet.com/product/detail/fe356...-IoaAnpG8P8HAQ

  4. #33
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    That is funny because I just stumbled across that last night. For reference, the complete set of those axles: https://robertaxleproject.com/

    I'm building (well, spec'ing) out this travel bike frame (more on that later), and was debating whether to spec a thru axle. To do so, I needed to be able to solve the trailer problem. I saw that Burley makes a set of thru axles (https://burley.com/product/thru-axle/?) that look perfect as they should solve both the trailer hookup part and they have a spacer that should ensure that it clears the recessed (like "breezer") cup on frame NDS.
    Last edited by hozn; 02-17-2017 at 02:22 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mstone View Post
    It's definitely not a spur of the moment "I think I'll throw the bike in the car" kind of serendipity
    Sometimes it is.

    This past weekend we'd planned a trip to Lynchburg VA, for the primary purpose of a train excursion pulled by a historic steam engine (J-611). We took Amtrak so we wouldn't have to drive (and because you just can't ride enough trains in one weekend). Our hotel was in town, but about 5 miles from where the trip started, and 2 miles from the Amtrak station. We'd figured out the local bus system and found a reliable cab service to get around. But since the train excursion was Sunday and we had all day Saturday to goof off and explore, at the last minute we decided to take our bikes -- last-minute meaning the day before we left. Packed them up, took them to the King Street station, and hauled our bikes onto Amtrak as carry-on luggage.

    Having bikes for transportation within Lynchburg was a lot nicer than not having them. Lynchburg is nicknamed Hill City for good reason, but the streets are fairly quiet and there's also a few bike trails. Saturday we were up early to watch the steam engine crossing a trestle, then we visited museums, a historic home, climbed the famed Monument Terrace, and snacked at the community market. The parts we didn't want to ride, we just locked up and walked. Near the end of the day we took the trail out to Percival's Island for a nature break and views of the (very flooded) James River.

    Sunday we were out even earlier to join our trip at 6:30 AM (early morning hill ride on vacation). We packed up the bikes that evening for Amtrak on Monday morning. I didn't get a chance to put my bike together again until before work today, but I had a little extra time, and I think it took less than an hour.

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  7. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by ginacico View Post
    I hadn't seen those, specifically, but they look interesting.

    Peter has the Backpack Case and I have Co-Motion's Co-Pilot Travel Case.

    Both are roughly 26x26x10, just inside the airline regulation limits. They accommodate 700c wheels (must deflate the tires) but don't require removing the fork. Conveniently, the soft case fits inside the other one, which comes in handy when we're traveling with two bikes or the tandem, because we can pre-ship or store them as one case.

    Anecdotally, we both really appreciate that the Co-Motion case has a telescoping handle and wheels. Backpack styles work okay, but the reality of lugging around a bulky case on your back gets old pretty fast.
    Which case do you recommend? Is the Copilot worth the premium?

    I'm to the point where I am looking at cases.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hozn View Post
    Which case do you recommend? Is the Copilot worth the premium?

    I'm to the point where I am looking at cases.
    Based on the two styles we have, the Copilot definitely wins. Having wheels and a handle is just a lot easier while lugging the bike through train stations, to hotels, etc. It has sturdy handles on all four sides, for whenever you need to hump it into a luggage rack. It's made of a durable fabric with hard plastic internal supports, which means it's less likely to be crushed during travel, but it's still flexible enough to accommodate the wheels and frame. Large pockets on the outside are nice for tools and accessories.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ginacico View Post
    Based on the two styles we have, the Copilot definitely wins. Having wheels and a handle is just a lot easier while lugging the bike through train stations, to hotels, etc. It has sturdy handles on all four sides, for whenever you need to hump it into a luggage rack. It's made of a durable fabric with hard plastic internal supports, which means it's less likely to be crushed during travel, but it's still flexible enough to accommodate the wheels and frame. Large pockets on the outside are nice for tools and accessories.
    Yeah, it was between those two that I was debating, so glad for the great review. I have been watching for a used one to come up (on eBay or whatever), but looks like I will be getting a new one! Thanks again. Really appreciate the advice.

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  12. #38
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    Happy to share the enthusiasm, and I can't wait to hear about your first adventures!

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    A couple things that I didn't see scanning this thread:

    1) BicycleTouringPro has been all over the world with his Co-motion bike. He doesn't seem to use the S&S couplers very often. It's easier to pack into a full sized box. You may want to ask him about it.

    2) Bike Friday and Moulton both make packable road bikes (BF has touring/gravel bikes also). Bikes@Vienna has a Moulton at a really good price right now if you want to test ride it. Having smaller wheels makes it easier to get a smaller package. Path Less Pedaled has a video showing the unpacking/packing of the Moulton and several reviews of it.

    3) Bikes with couplers on the frame typically have cable quick releases, if that hasn't been brought up.

  15. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by FFX_Hinterlands View Post
    A couple things that I didn't see scanning this thread:

    1) BicycleTouringPro has been all over the world with his Co-motion bike. He doesn't seem to use the S&S couplers very often. It's easier to pack into a full sized box. You may want to ask him about it.
    Yeah, I'm sure it's much easier to pack in a full-size box My primary concern is fitting a full-size bike box in the back of a European car along with two suitcases, carry-ons, ... kids. I don't see that happening. My secondary concern ("while I'm at it") is that if I can save $300 per trip in baggage costs, that'd pay for the cost of the couplers after 2 trips.

    Quote Originally Posted by FFX_Hinterlands View Post
    2) Bike Friday and Moulton both make packable road bikes (BF has touring/gravel bikes also). Bikes@Vienna has a Moulton at a really good price right now if you want to test ride it. Having smaller wheels makes it easier to get a smaller package. Path Less Pedaled has a video showing the unpacking/packing of the Moulton and several reviews of it.
    Good points. Yeah, I briefly considered a smaller/folding bike too. If I travelled a lot and was intending to use my bike more casually (e.g. for transportation or more occasional short rides), I'd probably have considered that option more fully. But for longer usage (weeks) I want a full-size bike, and really I want my bike with my saddle, my bars & brakes, etc.

    Quote Originally Posted by FFX_Hinterlands View Post
    3) Bikes with couplers on the frame typically have cable quick releases, if that hasn't been brought up.
    Yeah, cable splitters were discussed at some point here. For me, I am just using external routing with zip-tie stops; it's easy to pull off the cables/hoses. If I'm removing my RD anyway (which it sounds like is the prudent thing to do), it's minimal extra work.
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    I have heard that there are velcro zip-ties that work in place of the c-clips (or regular zip ties) that might be worth pursuing (@ginacico, have you heard of that?), though popping off c-clips is quite quick (I mostly worry about them popping off and getting lost).

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