Page 23 of 23 FirstFirst ... 13212223
Results 221 to 226 of 226

Thread: Your latest bike project?

  1. #221
    mstone is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    3,827
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trailrunner View Post
    Assuming no change in temperature, the absolute pressure in the tire doesn't change, but the the gauge pressure (pressure relative to the ambient, or atmosphere) will change. On the ground, the ambient pressure is 14.7 psi, so even if you were to fly to vacuum of outer space where the ambient pressure is zero, the gauge pressure of the tire will increase 14.7 psi.
    And then your eyes will do this: Click image for larger version. 

Name:	sku_153729_5.jpg 
Views:	57 
Size:	23.9 KB 
ID:	15079 True fact.

  2. ELITE Steve O ELITED this post
  3. #222
    hozn's Avatar
    hozn is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Arlington
    Posts
    3,130
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vicegrip View Post
    It stays the same*. The air pressure outside of the tire air chamber drops. The sun does not go down the horizon goes up. The most it could drop is 14.7 psi but if that happens that is the least of your worries as the aircraft is no longer in the earths atmosphere. OTOH the view would great! If I had tubeless I might drop the pressure a bit but not much. There is a risk of having a bead be pushed on by some other bike part or other luggage, unseat and drool tire slime all over the bike.

    * I bet the internal pressure does drop a little as the air temps in the hold will drop.
    Yeah, I might add a bit of air. I dropped them down to around 20psi (normally 50ish); they are holding on well, but the risk of losing the bead is a real one. On the way home I will definitely let out the air as it'll help the bars / brake hoods fit a bit easier. I guess worst case I'll arrive to a few oz of sealant in the suitcase and be back where I would have started with tubes.

  4. #223
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Falls church
    Posts
    1,162
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    A small price to pay for good memories of a cool adventure.

  5. #224
    hozn's Avatar
    hozn is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Arlington
    Posts
    3,130
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vicegrip View Post
    A small price to pay for good memories of a cool adventure.
    I chickened out and let out the air :-) it wasn't the risk of sealant everywhere as much as the risk it was incurring to my brake hoods (reservoirs), pushing them against the top of case.

    I can run with tubes until I am able to swing by the bike shop and borrow their floor pump.

  6. #225
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Falls church
    Posts
    1,162
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Forgot about the hydro brakes. Are they the no air type reservoirs? Any air will expand by about 50% volume with air pressure at a bit over 6 rather than 14.7.

  7. #226
    hozn's Avatar
    hozn is offline I really need to log off the internet and go for a ride.
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Arlington
    Posts
    3,130
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Vicegrip View Post
    Forgot about the hydro brakes. Are they the no air type reservoirs? Any air will expand by about 50% volume with air pressure at a bit over 6 rather than 14.7.
    Yeah, hopefully they are still well bled [so there's no air in them] and I won't have any issues with those. On the whole, I would say that if I were going to travel frequently and cared that I be able to pack and setup quickly, I would strongly consider a rim-brake bike. But I will really enjoy having my hydro brakes and this bike is my commuter*, so I'm happy to spend the extra time removing the calipers, etc.

    Things that make packing this bike a little more involved:
    - 6-bolt rotors slow to remove. I was going to do CL rotors; however, doing that means I have to carry a BB tool and a cassette lockring tool, which are both pretty big/heavy tools.
    - Remove the calipers and hoses, though the zip-tie stops worked perfectly and made hose removal a 30second process.
    - The 135/142 OLD for rear hub is obviously more than a standard 130 road hub; every mm does matter a little.
    - Big-range cassette (11-40) definitely leaves less flexibility for frame part placement.
    - Hydro levers have tall hoods.

    But I have done it a few times now so I have a system. *Love* the Copilot case.

    Without air in the tires fitting things in the case almost felt too easy. Even with a few kits, shoes, pump, greases & lubes & sealant, lights, etc. still comfortably under 50lbs. Heck, I could have probably put my fenders in there. I might leave the fork on next time, as that might work (the front triangle fits fine; the only issue was that with fork on the downtube passed right over the center point of the case, which is really where I'd like the cassette to be for the rear wheel (face down against the bottom).

    * The coupler frame is my commuter frame currently, though I've decided that I'm going to get a second identical frame w/o couplers. The way I ride/abuse my bikes, I think that makes sense. So switching to use the coupler frame will just mean taking the crankset off the one bike (everything else has to be taken off anyway). If I end up traveling more, I'll just get a second crankset for the travel bike so I won't even have that to swap.
    Last edited by hozn; 07-05-2017 at 07:40 AM.

  8. Likes Harry Meatmotor liked this post

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •