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Thread: Montgomery County Has a Bicycle Stress Map Now!

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    Default Montgomery County Has a Bicycle Stress Map Now!


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    Very interesting and a pretty cool idea. It seems like it needs some tinkering in the hinterlands though. Peach Tree Rd out near Poolesville is high stress? I don't think so. And Big Woods Rd? Moderately high stress? I've seen less cars on that road than the number of times I've ridden on it (3).

    Most of River Rd is either High or Very high. I could see it being moderately high, but it's one of the only useful routes west in MontCo and there's a lot of bike traffic on it.

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    If you click on the metro stations, you get a map and a number for "Percent of Dwelling Units Connected to Station on Low-Stress Bicycle Network" I think that feature is pretty cool and shows where the county can do work to make transportation a bit more attractive. There's no indication of the distance, though.

    Wonder if they have the same data for the MARC stations as well.


    Station % Connected dwellings low-stress
    Takoma 54
    Glenmont 53
    Medical Center 46
    Forest Glen 29
    Twinbrook 28
    Grosvernor-Strathmore 26
    Silver Spring 4
    Friendship Heights 4
    Bethesda 4
    Wheaton 1
    Rockville 1
    White Flint 0
    Shady Grove 0

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    Unfortunately the map also highlights the fact that if you actually want to get out of your neighborhood you forced to ride a moderate or high stress route at some point. Most of the blue and green routes are cul de sacs or circles within a residential neighborhood. An example of unintentional consequences of suburban street design.
    Last edited by KLizotte; 04-07-2016 at 01:36 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KLizotte View Post
    Unfortunately the map also highlights the fact that if you actually want to get out of your neighborhood you have to ride a moderate or high stress route at some point. Most of the blue and green routes are cul de sacs or circles within a residential neighborhood. An example of unintentional consequences of suburban street design.
    It's the big problem with the suburbs and sprawl right? I see this all the time as I try to design bike rides around the area. Neighborhoods are never connected to each other on small, back roads. Always highways. It's really frustrating. Thus the need for planners to make bike routes on or next to them.

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    Did anyone else click on the videos? "Low stress" is biking on a sidewalk. "Moderate-low stress" is a door zone bike lane that even shows a car door closing right in front of the cyclist and partial bike lane blockage.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dasgeh View Post
    Did anyone else click on the videos? "Low stress" is biking on a sidewalk. "Moderate-low stress" is a door zone bike lane that even shows a car door closing right in front of the cyclist and partial bike lane blockage.
    I like that they have video examples, although I think you differ with them on their opinion of stress level.

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    Quote Originally Posted by americancyclo View Post
    I like that they have video examples, although I think you differ with them on their opinion of stress level.
    Also note that within each infrastructure type, the examples are cherry-picked:

    - the "high-stress" bike lane segment is shot right after a traffic signal lets the herd loose
    - the "low-stress" sidewalk has no conflict points with turning vehicles, nor any pedestrians
    - the "no-stress" trolley trail segment includes no interactions with joggers / children / dogs / etc.

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    Please add your comments and critiques here. I looks like the BikeArlington team will be chatting with the Montgomery team about comfort maps and I'd like to share feedback.

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    Quote Originally Posted by scoot View Post
    Also note that within each infrastructure type, the examples are cherry-picked:

    - the "high-stress" bike lane segment is shot right after a traffic signal lets the herd loose
    - the "low-stress" sidewalk has no conflict points with turning vehicles, nor any pedestrians
    - the "no-stress" trolley trail segment includes no interactions with joggers / children / dogs / etc.
    The high-stress isn't even that bad given that you DO in fact have a bike lane and some space. High stress for me is climbing a hill on a high speed, 2 lane road with little to no shoulder.

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