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dasgeh
10-02-2015, 05:16 PM
Next ABAC meeting is Monday, October 5, 2015 7pm 2100 Clarendon Blvd, 3rd floor conference room.

We have an exciting agenda! All are welcome

7:00pm
Call to Order; Introductions; approve minutes (August and September on-site)
Gillian

7:10pm
Signals
Josh Nicholas

7:40pm
ACPD
Lt. Dennis

8:00pm
Crystal City Transitway
Matthew Huston

8:30pm
Custis Trail maintenance
Kevin

8:40pm
Arlington County Staff Updates
A. Projects: Bike counting
B. BikeArlington
C. Parks: lights; survey


8:55pm
New Business
Gillian


9:00pm
Adjournment
Gillian

greenjug
10-06-2015, 12:21 PM
how'd the meeting go? i'm curious about the Custis Trail part. I love the newly paved parts. My question is related to the lovely but slippery leaves that cover the trail sometimes...does the trail get sweeped ever? Or is it maintained in another way perhaps? thanks!

chris_s
10-06-2015, 12:24 PM
how'd the meeting go? i'm curious about the Custis Trail part. I love the newly paved parts. My question is related to the lovely but slippery leaves that cover the trail sometimes...does the trail get sweeped ever? Or is it maintained in another way perhaps? thanks!

The Trails Manager wasn't there so we didn't get an update.

dasgeh
10-06-2015, 12:36 PM
how'd the meeting go? i'm curious about the Custis Trail part. I love the newly paved parts. My question is related to the lovely but slippery leaves that cover the trail sometimes...does the trail get sweeped ever? Or is it maintained in another way perhaps? thanks!

Please report the areas you're concerned about to trails@arlingtonva.us . They do sweep the trail, and they probably need to be reminded of areas of particular concern as we get into fall. <Please include the S curve by Lyon Village>

The BAC did take action to suggest a dedicated budget for trail maintenance.

scoot
10-07-2015, 09:19 AM
I'm curious as to what was discussed about signals.

dasgeh
10-20-2015, 07:24 PM
I'm curious as to what was discussed about signals.
Here's one part of the signals discussion:

At this month's BAC meeting, Josh Nicholas from the Signals team in DES came to present. One issue we discussed was pedestrian signals that do not automatically turn to "walk" when the corresponding traffic light turns green, or that turn to "walk" then count down and change to "don't walk" automatically after a certain amount of time, even if the corresponding traffic signal remains green. Josh asked us to send him a list of such signals that should be set to "rest in walk" but are not.

For example, along the north/west side Arlington Boulevard Trail, where the trail crosses the traffic entering from Courthouse, the pedestrian signal should be rest in walk, automatically switching to walk with the green for cars going along westbound 50. Another example is North Monroe at Lee Highway.

If you have other examples (like the intersections along Columbia Pike near 27 referenced in the WashCycle writeup), please post here (or otherwise send them to me) and I'll compile a list.

Thanks

PotomacCyclist
10-20-2015, 08:32 PM
I believe 15th & S. Fern is one example. 18th & S. Eads is another.

I've noticed the issue in the past at these locations, but I don't remember if they are still problems.

shannon
10-20-2015, 10:01 PM
15th st N and Glebe Road (east side of Glebe)

dasgeh
10-21-2015, 07:52 AM
15th st N and Glebe Road (east side of Glebe)

Which reminds me, another is crossing Glebe at the ramp from EB Rte 50 (which is also technically the crossing of the southside Arlington Boulevard Trail).

KLizotte
10-22-2015, 11:41 AM
The lights at the start of the W&OD; that is FMR and S Shirlington Rd require the beg buttons to be pushed.

Emm
10-22-2015, 11:53 AM
per your post on another thread--

Also, ArlCo Signals staff said that NO signal along a trail should be actuated (i.e. they should all be recall). If you know of any intersections that don't conform to this, please let me know on this thread, (http://bikearlingtonforum.com/showthread.php?9371-October-2015-ABAC-Meeting) and I'll compile a list to send to ArlCo.

In this case the light connecting the trail crossing on Potomac Ave across E. Glebe is in violation (as long as they count that path as a trail--which they should). It's currently semi-automated and should be automated. This one could also use a leading pedestrian interval. It's become a dangerous intersection. The current status is even when there is a walk signal for pedestrians to cross potomac ave where the trail connects, cars from e. glebe (which dead ends onto potomac) have a green light. Cars turning left or right have had numerous near misses, and at least one serious collision with a cyclist in the crosswalk. They don't appear to expect pedestrians to have the walk signal at the same moment they have a green light.

It'd also help to have this as an automatic walk signal because the call box is placed VERY poorly for people on the trail. You have to veer right a little away from Potomac Ave onto Glebe, push the botton, and then veer left to go back towards Potomac Ave to cross the trail. Because of this many pedestrians and cyclists can't figure out the call signal, or don't push the button since it's out of the way and in an illogical location for trail users.

KLizotte
10-22-2015, 12:58 PM
I can see what you mean about the goofy placement of the call box on Glebe. It's in the middle of the trail!

9870

I'm completely flummoxed that drivers don't expect pedestrians when making a left or right off of Glebe. There are big crosswalks and it is no different than making any other left or right turn at an intersection. Hits head against keyboard.

elbows
10-22-2015, 01:09 PM
If I understand you correctly and off the top of my head, signals that do not automatically turn to "walk" when the corresponding traffic light turns green include:

Columbia Pike at Walter Reed
Columbia Pike at S Barton St.

I have recently verified experiences at the these locations and both have a lot of pedestrians.

mstone
10-22-2015, 04:32 PM
...and if the lights change anyway, WHY IS THERE A BUTTON?

komorebi
10-22-2015, 07:48 PM
The current status is even when there is a walk signal for pedestrians to cross potomac ave where the trail connects, cars from e. glebe (which dead ends onto potomac) have a green light. Cars turning left or right have had numerous near misses, and at least one serious collision with a cyclist in the crosswalk. They don't appear to expect pedestrians to have the walk signal at the same moment they have a green light.

The cars turning left from E. Glebe are so un-used to seeing pedestrians or cyclists in the crosswalk that I've started treating the pedestrian signal here as a leading CAR interval -- I let all of the cars turn left before I enter the crosswalk.


It'd also help to have this as an automatic walk signal because the call box is placed VERY poorly for people on the trail. You have to veer right a little away from Potomac Ave onto Glebe, push the botton, and then veer left to go back towards Potomac Ave to cross the trail. Because of this many pedestrians and cyclists can't figure out the call signal, or don't push the button since it's out of the way and in an illogical location for trail users.

Per my post (http://bikearlingtonforum.com/showthread.php?8417-Between-you-me-and-the-lamp-post&p=126611#post126611) on the other thread, they appear to have changed the call box placement last week. The setup of that whole corner is still illogical, though.

Vicegrip
10-23-2015, 06:34 AM
...and if the lights change anyway, WHY IS THERE A BUTTON?

To tell the system you are there and want it to change?

mstone
10-23-2015, 08:53 AM
To tell the system you are there and want it to change?

Um, "if the lights change anyway". There are some intersections which never get a ped crossing if you don't push a button. There are some intersections which get a ped crossing instantly if you push a button. There are some intersections which don't seem to alter their cycle at all if you push a button. There are some intersections which have a broken button and won't produce a ped crossing even if the button is pushed. There are some intersections where you see a bunch of people waiting to cross and assume someone hit the button but nobody ever did. The beg button interface is infuriatingly bad, and does not provide sufficient feedback to help people understand what is going on in any given instance. The existence of the class of intersections which have buttons which don't impact the cycle makes the whole farce evolve from "annoying" to "let's punch a traffic engineer in the face".

DaveK
10-23-2015, 09:54 AM
...and if the lights change anyway, WHY IS THERE A BUTTON?

They're required on newer signals because they house the audible signal equipment, regardless of if they're needed to actuate the signal.

dasgeh
10-23-2015, 01:04 PM
They're required on newer signals because they house the audible signal equipment, regardless of if they're needed to actuate the signal.

Wait, what? There's no way to have a box without a button to house audible signal equipment.

DaveK
10-23-2015, 01:34 PM
Wait, what? There's no way to have a box without a button to house audible signal equipment.

They house both a locator tone and an arrow to indicate direction, which is discernible through touch for the vision-impaired.

mstone
10-23-2015, 01:59 PM
They house both a locator tone and an arrow to indicate direction, which is discernible through touch for the vision-impaired.

Then it should have a big sign that says "locator tone and audible crossing signal for the visually impaired" so people don't get the idea that it's a crosswalk button.

Steve O
10-23-2015, 03:40 PM
Then it should have a big sign that says "locator tone and audible crossing signal for the visually impaired" ...

I thought you were going elsewhere with this, but then you veered into the totally common-sensical.

PotomacCyclist
10-23-2015, 10:39 PM
per your post on another thread--

In this case the light connecting the trail crossing on Potomac Ave across E. Glebe is in violation (as long as they count that path as a trail--which they should). It's currently semi-automated and should be automated. This one could also use a leading pedestrian interval. It's become a dangerous intersection. The current status is even when there is a walk signal for pedestrians to cross potomac ave where the trail connects, cars from e. glebe (which dead ends onto potomac) have a green light. Cars turning left or right have had numerous near misses, and at least one serious collision with a cyclist in the crosswalk. They don't appear to expect pedestrians to have the walk signal at the same moment they have a green light.

It'd also help to have this as an automatic walk signal because the call box is placed VERY poorly for people on the trail. You have to veer right a little away from Potomac Ave onto Glebe, push the botton, and then veer left to go back towards Potomac Ave to cross the trail. Because of this many pedestrians and cyclists can't figure out the call signal, or don't push the button since it's out of the way and in an illogical location for trail users.

That intersection is in Alexandria. Arlington won't be able to do anything about this signal.

Emm
10-24-2015, 12:57 PM
That intersection is in Alexandria. Arlington won't be able to do anything about this signal.

Good point. I don't know why I always think potomac yards is in Arlington.

kwarkentien
10-25-2015, 06:15 AM
per your post on another thread--

In this case the light connecting the trail crossing on Potomac Ave across E. Glebe is in violation (as long as they count that path as a trail--which they should). It's currently semi-automated and should be automated. This one could also use a leading pedestrian interval. It's become a dangerous intersection. The current status is even when there is a walk signal for pedestrians to cross potomac ave where the trail connects, cars from e. glebe (which dead ends onto potomac) have a green light. Cars turning left or right have had numerous near misses, and at least one serious collision with a cyclist in the crosswalk. They don't appear to expect pedestrians to have the walk signal at the same moment they have a green light.

It'd also help to have this as an automatic walk signal because the call box is placed VERY poorly for people on the trail. You have to veer right a little away from Potomac Ave onto Glebe, push the botton, and then veer left to go back towards Potomac Ave to cross the trail. Because of this many pedestrians and cyclists can't figure out the call signal, or don't push the button since it's out of the way and in an illogical location for trail users.

This one needs to get reported to Alexandria. This location is not in Arlington.

PotomacCyclist
10-25-2015, 08:21 AM
Good point. I don't know why I always think potomac yards is in Arlington.

The former Potomac Yard was located in both Arlington and Alexandria. The SE section of Arlington is still referred to as Potomac Yard or Potomac Yard-Arlington (my preferred description). There's even a small slice of the north bank of Four Mile Run that is actually part of Alexandria. Everything south of FMR (in the Potomac Yard area) is in Alexandria.

The FAST Potomac Yard transportation nonprofit group covers both the Arlington and Alexandria sections of Potomac Yard. They co-sponsor the two CaBi bike stations in the Arlington section.

KWL
10-25-2015, 05:44 PM
The former Potomac Yard was located in both Arlington and Alexandria. ...We moved into Del Ray when the rail yards were still active. Our backdoor neighbor had been a fireman on the old RF&P line. There was a pedestrian bridge over the tracks at the end of our street where railroad employees could walk to work from their homes in Del Ray. At that time we referred to it as "Potomac Yards" not "Yard". It was certainly big enough for more than one. Does anyone know when the name shifted to the singular? Or perhaps we were just wrong all those years.

CaseyKane50
10-25-2015, 06:57 PM
Does anyone know when the name shifted to the singular? Or perhaps we were just wrong all those years.

Here are a several references that use the singular

From the "History of Potomac Yard, Appendix 3, City of Alexandria, Va." https://alexandriava.gov/uploadedFiles/planning/info/Appendices%20I-V.pdf


Potomac Yard, 1906-1987
In the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the Washington, D.C. area became a major point for the transfer of freight between northern and southern rail networks. The railroads carried perishable goods, such as fruits, vegetables, and livestock, from the southern states to urban markets in the North, and transported manufactured goods from northern factories to the South. With multiple rail companies serving each region at the turn of the twentieth century, there was no central location for the transfer of freight between the northern
and southern lines (Mullen 2007:47). The situation was particularly difficult in Alexandria, where a significant bottleneck occurred with all these rail lines trying to pass through town. East/west City streets were blocked, as 20 to 30 trains per day came through on Fayette and Henry streets. With the rising volume of rail traffic, the system became increasingly unwieldy, and a movement to beautify Washington took up the cause to get the railroads out of the cities (Griffin 2005). The solution took shape as an unusual business undertaking, when six competing railroads agreed to band together to construct the rail yard and facilitate the movement of freight between the northern and southern rail lines. Potomac Yard, known as the “Gateway Between the North and the South,” became the largest railroad yard for freight car interchange on the east coast. When Potomac Yard opened on August 1, 1906, it had 52 miles of track that could handle 3,127 cars. The yard grew to a maximum of 136 miles of track crammed into a 2 1⁄2 to 3 mile stretch of land. At its peak, it serviced 103 trains daily (Griffin 2005; Carper 1992; Mullen 2007:47, 49).

From "History of The Long Railroad Bridge Crossing Across the Potomac River" http://www.dcnrhs.org/learn/washington-d-c-railroad-history/history-of-the-long-bridge


Out of this movement, Potomac Yard in Alexandria County, Va. and Union Station in Washington City were created. The old, separate city stations were removed. The plan also necessitated a new railroad bridge across the Potomac River at lower 14th Street to handle the increased freight and passenger flow.

From "Timeline of Washington, D.C. Railroad History" http://www.dcnrhs.org/learn/washington-d-c-railroad-history/timeline-of-washington-d-c-railroad-history


34) 1902-1906 New Long Railroad Bridge (August 25,1904) & Highway Bridge (February 12,1906) open across Potomac River. Construction concurrent with station consolidation in city proper, Potomac Yard & other McMillan Commission recommendations. Railroad bridge remains to this day, although largely altered during World War 11. Highway bridge removed from service 1961 and replaced; finally demolished May, 1967- March, 1969.

lordofthemark
10-25-2015, 08:02 PM
We moved into Del Ray when the rail yards were still active. Our backdoor neighbor had been a fireman on the old RF&P line. There was a pedestrian bridge over the tracks at the end of our street where railroad employees could walk to work from their homes in Del Ray. At that time we referred to it as "Potomac Yards" not "Yard". It was certainly big enough for more than one. Does anyone know when the name shifted to the singular? Or perhaps we were just wrong all those years.

I worked as a financial analyst at CSX, doing cost analysis of proposed unit trains. We always called it Pot Yard. It came up a fair amount, as PY was the interchange between the Chessie, which CSX owned, and the RF&P which we only partly owned. So the routing from, say, Jacksonville to Baltimore, would be CSX -Richmond - RF&P - Pot Yard - CSX.

PotomacCyclist
10-26-2015, 01:07 AM
I think it has always been Potomac Yard, singular. But many people use the plural because of other names like Camden Yards. The plural flows a bit better. I used to mix up the two myself, until I realized that all of the official organizations and citations use the singular form.

The shopping center in the Alexandria section is named Potomac Yard Center: http://www.mypotomacyard.com/

FAST Potomac Yard (covering both the Arlington and Alexandria sections) uses the singular: http://www.fastpotomacyard.com/

The office building complex in the Arlington section is called National Gateway at Potomac Yard: http://klnbretail.propertycapsule.com/property/output/center/detail/id:1058

It's similar to Daylight Saving Time, which is also singular. Many people say "Daylight Savings Time," which is incorrect. That's because "savings" is heard in common terms like "savings account." (This comparison is also relevant because DST ends next weekend, at 2 am on Sun. Nov. 1.) Every decade or two, it seems that Congress extends the number of months that we follow DST. Eventually, DST will cover 11.75 months of the year, leaving "Standard Time" at just one week. Or one day.

Emm
10-26-2015, 09:30 AM
I think it has always been Potomac Yard, singular. But many people use the plural because of other names like Camden Yards. The plural flows a bit better. I used to mix up the two myself, until I realized that all of the official organizations and citations use the singular form.


It's also a Michigan thing. We make stores and companies possessive/plural. It due to the history of family's like Ford and Meijer starting stores/companies. So Kroger is Kroger's, Meijer is Meijer's, and I have attempted to do it to Safeway and Giant too since I moved here from Michigan but it doesn't roll well off the tongue for them. But it does for Potomac Yards ;)

dasgeh
10-26-2015, 09:38 AM
On back on topic: The light for crossing Wakefield along Columbia Pike certainly needs to be rest in walk.

The lights crossing both George Mason and Glebe at the ramp from EB 50 (so south of 50) are technically along the Arlington Boulevard Trail, and should be rest in walk.

Any others? I'd like to wrap this up and email the County.

elbows
10-26-2015, 09:50 AM
To add more intersections:

Yesterday, while riding past the marathon traffic parking lot, I noticed that the ped button at (I think) Arl. Blvd. Trail and N. Fairfax Drive does not seem to work at all.
Also, I know we've talked about this before but the ped button at Irving and 50 does work BUT, and I could be wrong, I think it must be pressed for a cyclist to get the green which is both not communicated to cyclists and a little awkward - or maybe that's in part because I'm always carrying groceries there. Plus, while I'm pretty slow, even I don't need 30 seconds to cross 50 - at places like that, maybe it would make sense to have a bicycle cycle (mostly cyclists use it and many drivers must wait - 20 seconds once the inter section clears X 20 drivers does add up).
Also, the ped button at Columbia Pike and S. Scott can be a ridiculously long wait sometimes. Like 4 or more minutes, it seems, even when the traffic is low. I guess I could verify this.

dasgeh
10-26-2015, 10:02 AM
Yesterday, while riding past the marathon traffic parking lot, I noticed that the ped button at (I think) Arl. Blvd. Trail and N. Fairfax Drive does not seem to work at all.

Can you show me where on a map?


Also, I know we've talked about this before but the ped button at Irving and 50 does work BUT, and I could be wrong, I think it must be pressed for a cyclist to get the green which is both not communicated to cyclists and a little awkward - or maybe that's in part because I'm always carrying groceries there. Plus, while I'm pretty slow, even I don't need 30 seconds to cross 50 - at places like that, maybe it would make sense to have a bicycle cycle (mostly cyclists use it and many drivers must wait - 20 seconds once the inter section clears X 20 drivers does add up).


Irving and 50 is a horrible intersection that is in the process of being redesigned. I ask about it at most BAC meetings, and I think we're getting an update on it next week. I believe we've suggested a bike light there, and I don't remember what they said. I know we've been promised bike detection, so we won't have to push no stinkin' button.


Also, the ped button at Columbia Pike and S. Scott can be a ridiculously long wait sometimes. Like 4 or more minutes, it seems, even when the traffic is low. I guess I could verify this.

I'll add to the list, but if you could confirm, that would be great. Thanks

elbows
10-26-2015, 10:27 AM
[QUOTE=dasgeh;126738]Can you show me where on a map?

If I got it right, it is this (https://www.google.com/maps/place/38%C2%B053'11.4%22N+77%C2%B005'02.2%22W/@38.886515,-77.0844935,161m/data=!3m2!1e3!4b1!4m2!3m1!1s0x0:0x0)one.

Thanks so much, dasgeh.

scoot
10-26-2015, 11:30 AM
My understanding of "rest-in-walk", after a few minutes of googling:

Where a major road and a minor intersect at a sensor-actuated signal, it is only used for walk signals parallel to the major road. The reason: green phases for the minor roads actuated by vehicle detectors are often too short to accommodate pedestrians trying to cross the large highway. So for crossings that are used by more vehicles than peds, triggering the walk cycle automatically would increase wait times and delays on the arterial. A beg button is used so that pedestrians can request the extra time when they are present.

Irving and 50 is a good example of such an intersection. I have been automatically detected with a CaBi over the sensor, but it is sporadic at best. So if there are no other vehicles waiting, I just push the button. It's inefficient though: Since I can ride across the intersection in a few seconds, Arlington Blvd traffic is then stuck watching an empty intersection for another 25 seconds. Rest-in-walk is already used for pedestrians parallel to 50 crossing Irving, but would not work for Irving crossing 50.

Some of the other signals discussed in this thread, while problematic for various reasons, are also not candidates for rest-in-walk behavior. The Arlington Boulevard trail crossings at Glebe and George Mason are a special case, but they too might be a tough sell. Because those roads don't intersect 50 at-grade, they become the major roads where they intersect the trail and off-ramps/service roads. IIRC, most of the intersections in Crystal City are on automatic cycles, not sensor-actuated, so those could incorporate rest-in-walk (and should, since it's an urban area with lots of peds).

dasgeh
10-26-2015, 11:46 AM
My understanding of "rest-in-walk", after a few minutes of googling:

You're description is what was described to us at the BAC meeting. However, County staff also stated that
- not all signals are correctly calibrated, so that some pedestrian signals should be rest in walk but aren't. E.g. crossing Wakefield (small street) along Columbia Pike - that should be rest-in-walk but just isn't. County staff wants to know so they can fix it.

- trails should always get rest-in-walk, even if it delays the arterial, because they are trails (given, the example we were discussing when this statement was made was the W&OD, not the ABT, but the statement was generalized, so I'm holding them to it!). The ABT crossing of (I call it the on-ramp from Courthouse, elbows called it N Fairfax) certainly should be rest-in-walk with the mainline traffic continuing onto 50 (because it crosses the traffic coming from Courthouse road, getting on to 50).

- yes, automatically activating the pedestrian signal can cause some delay to motorists, but how much depends on the width of the road, and how many cars go through from the side streets. You picked the intersection with probably the highest possible delay in Arlington -- there aren't many cars that cross 50 at Irving, and 50 is VERY wide, so the difference in time that 50 is normally stopped (i.e. the time for one or two cars to cross on Irving) and the time that 50 would have to be stopped for a pedestrian to cross is huge. Think about a normal two lane road, and/or a road where typically, when the side street is actuated, there are 4 cars. The difference in stopping time for the arterial when there is one car and when there is one pedestrian is minimal (may 10 seconds?). The difference in stopping time for the arterial when there are four cars and when there is one pedestrian probably nonexistent. Add to that situation lots of pedestrians, who otherwise might just ignore the pedestrian signal and chance it, possibly getting "stranded" in the middle of the street when the signal for the arterial changes.

So in those examples, in order to encourage people to walk and bike and to keep people who do choose to walk and bike, the County should program to signals to rest-in-walk, and accept the potential of small delays for motorists on the arterials.

-

mstone
10-26-2015, 12:22 PM
I'd be more willing to accept the "not fair for drivers to have to wait for empty crosswalk" argument if there were a quid pro quo involving peds/bikes not having to wait extremely long times as a baseline expectation.

scoot
10-26-2015, 01:07 PM
To be clear, my post was intended to summarize the present engineering standards regarding "rest-in-walk", not to advocate for or against them.

For biking, I usually choose between the Irving and Fillmore crossings based on traffic levels and direction. Most of my northbound crossings are during evening rush hour, and I prefer Irving. Fillmore can be uncomfortably busy during these times. There are usually a few vehicles at Irving in rush hour, so I don't need to use the beg button. Most of my southbound crossings are later in the evening, and then I prefer Fillmore. It's more direct to my destination, more reliable, and not totally devoid of activity. Plus no ride is complete without at least one little hill climb before getting home!

elbows
10-26-2015, 09:33 PM
As for the Pike and S Scott and my claim that it was 4 minutes once, I went back there tonight at about 9:15 pm and it was only 65 seconds after I hit the call button until the walk sign came on. Still a little long especially given that traffic was low, but not 4 minutes.

CaseyKane50
11-09-2015, 01:34 PM
Here's one part of the signals discussion:

At this month's BAC meeting, Josh Nicholas from the Signals team in DES came to present. One issue we discussed was pedestrian signals that do not automatically turn to "walk" when the corresponding traffic light turns green, or that turn to "walk" then count down and change to "don't walk" automatically after a certain amount of time, even if the corresponding traffic signal remains green. Josh asked us to send him a list of such signals that should be set to "rest in walk" but are not.

For example, along the north/west side Arlington Boulevard Trail, where the trail crosses the traffic entering from Courthouse, the pedestrian signal should be rest in walk, automatically switching to walk with the green for cars going along westbound 50. Another example is North Monroe at Lee Highway.

If you have other examples (like the intersections along Columbia Pike near 27 referenced in the WashCycle writeup), please post here (or otherwise send them to me) and I'll compile a list.

Thanks

I think the intersection of South Meade and South Glebe might be a candidate to have the walk signal activated when the light turns green for traffic on South Meade.

South Meade has a bike lane that ends about 100 feet before the intersection.

10051

As you approach the intersection, you can choose to get in the left turn lane or the right turn lane. Most bicyclists actually want to go straight across Glebe to the sidewalk.

10052

My experience on a bike is that neither lane detects a bike and doesn't activate the light. However, a car will activate the light, but the walk signal is only activated if the button is pushed. When the walk light is not activated, cars or bikes have a green light for about 15 seconds.