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Tim Kelley
05-21-2014, 10:10 AM
One of the long time bikers here in Arlington passed along some 20+ years old swag from the first Bike To Work Day!

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baiskeli
05-21-2014, 10:59 AM
I still have that button on the right.

JimF22003
05-21-2014, 12:09 PM
Was that thing printed on a PLOTTER?

mstone
05-21-2014, 12:30 PM
Was that thing printed on a PLOTTER?

I was going to make a comment about having used a plotter not that long ago, but then I realized it was back in the 90s. :(

Drewdane
05-21-2014, 12:49 PM
Was that thing printed on a PLOTTER?
What's a plotter? :p

(no seriously - what's a plotter?)

Tim Kelley
05-21-2014, 12:51 PM
What's a plotter? :p

(no seriously - what's a plotter?)

It's a type of printer, commonly used for large scale prints.

(I was a history major, so I read about those once in a textbook)

brendan
05-21-2014, 12:57 PM
Now I'm having flashbacks to the piezoelectric carbon ampule printer my dad got from the DAK catalog that printed like a dot matrix printer, except instead of 10 vertical pixels per horizontal traversal, it printed one line of pixels per horizontal traversal, but it traversed very very very fast (at least for devices of the time). In draft mode, all the characters looked a bit like they were shivering...

B

mstone
05-21-2014, 12:59 PM
It's a kind of a printer in which the device held actual pens which were moved up and down and along geometric paths via a motor. They were unbelievably slow, but could produce actual circles vs jagged curves, and usually had selectable colors. They were mainly used for architectural/mechanical drafting and that sort of work involving fine details, and could often be used for really large output (multi-foot wide paper spools). They sucked for simple text, and are basically obsolete now that high-resolution laser & inkjet printers are ubiquitous. (Jagged edges are now too small to see.)

Kolohe
05-21-2014, 01:21 PM
I dunno, the government agency (natch) I used to work for until last year had plotters for large printouts (e.g. table sized maps)

PeteD
05-21-2014, 01:42 PM
Last I worked for had laser plotters (for network diagrams). Nothing better than something that can actually print out something at an ANSI E size in less than 15 seconds. Except, dat toner cartridge replacement cost...

--Pete

Amalitza
05-21-2014, 01:50 PM
I dunno, the government agency (natch) I used to work for until last year had plotters for large printouts (e.g. table sized maps)

We have one in my office. It's still in use.

mstone
05-21-2014, 02:36 PM
We have one in my office. It's still in use.

Like with actual pens, not an injet?

dkel
05-21-2014, 03:49 PM
Now that we're totally off topic: when I was a kid, the first computer we had in my house was one of these (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KIM-1). Then we upgraded to one of these (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SYM-1). There was no printer. Or monitor. Or qwerty keyboard (hexadecimal input only). Or even a plastic shell to house the thing.

Amalitza
05-21-2014, 04:20 PM
Like with actual pens, not an injet?

Ha, funny. I went upstairs to look at it to confirm it was the old-style (I didn't say *I* use it), and we have a new one (inkjet, obv). I have no idea when we got that... trying to remember last time I saw the old one... sometime in the last couple years (?)... I know it was there when my office moved from upstairs near it to downstairs where I am now, which was sometime around 2010
never mind...:o

((jeez, i am not that old, i swear)

baiskeli
05-22-2014, 11:19 AM
Old-school plotter:

http://media.soundonsound.com/sos/dec04/images/roland17aplotterdxy100r.l.jpg

baiskeli
05-22-2014, 11:23 AM
My dad had a TRS-80 in his office that I played with. The CPU and disk drive was so heavy it was furniture - part of the desk that was included with the computer. The daisy-wheel printer shook the whole desk when it printed. The disks were 8-inch floppies.

Good times.

http://oldcomputers.net/pics/TRS-80-II_table.JPG

APKhaos
05-22-2014, 11:37 AM
In the plotter generation, line printers were the top dog for text. Massive drum spinning at high speed with little hammers for each character position [fixed pitch text of course].
These babies could do a rocking 1200 lines/minute [around 20 pages/minute] on large format z fold paper with those ubiquitous serrated sprocket hole edges.
Nobody has these at home, but corporations and government agencies had rooms full of them.

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