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View Full Version : Can you cram a 135mm hub into a 130mm dropout-spaced (non-steel) frame?



krazygl00
05-02-2014, 01:51 PM
The frame in question is actually scandium and has 130mm dropout spacing and disc mounts. There are not that many options for 130mm disc hubs. I'm sure disc rotor alignment also further complicates matters. I'm pretty sure I know the answer to this already but I'm reaching.

jabberwocky
05-02-2014, 02:00 PM
I did so on my old Lemond Poprad (which was a 130mm disc bikes). I ran Hope MTB hubs on it. Took a little more effort to get them in but worked fine for several thousand miles.

That bike was steel though, which flexes easier than aluminum (scandium frames are an aluminum alloy).

DismalScientist
05-02-2014, 02:02 PM
Scandium frames are aluminum alloys containing less than 0.5% Scandium. (They add it to charge you more money.) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bicycle_frame

If it ain't steel, don't bend it.

hozn
05-03-2014, 04:09 AM
Novatec makes a hub that is probably a good value: http://www.bdopcycling.com/Hubs-D352SB-10.asp

I think I still have <1000 on my Novateca D712 rear hub, but expect it to be fine. Sounds like it is n+1, though. The Niner RLT9 is waiting out there!

Harry Meatmotor
05-07-2014, 02:27 PM
The frame in question is actually scandium and has 130mm dropout spacing and disc mounts. There are not that many options for 130mm disc hubs. I'm sure disc rotor alignment also further complicates matters. I'm pretty sure I know the answer to this already but I'm reaching.

You'll be fine. Asking a tubular aluminum chainstay & seatstay to bend 2.5mm over ~420mm of chainstay length isn't coming anywhere near plastically deforming the structure. I'd be a little tiny bit worried if you were taking the wheels off the bike everyday or something. Also, if it's a disk frameset, it may not have chainstay or seatstay bridges, and there'd be even more length of tubing to take the minor bending.