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View Full Version : I Need a New Cable, Right?



eminva
10-13-2013, 08:33 AM
Hello All --

I was working again this morning on the continuing saga of trying to get the indexing right on my bike. As soon as I released the anchor bolt, the little aluminum end cap thingy came off and the cable did this:

3844

I assume my only solution now is a new cable? Or is there any McGyvering this? Thanks in advance.

Liz

hozn
10-13-2013, 08:39 AM
I think you need a new shifter cable, yeah. It is probably worth also investing in the Park Tool cable cutter which enables very clean cuts (it also cuts housing and crimps the ferrules). The Spin Doctor version from PerformanceBike is not as hardy, I have found (it no longer cuts cables or housing cleanly for me, but mine is a couple years old).

DismalScientist
10-13-2013, 08:54 AM
Your cable looks like it was cut cleanly. You would have just needed a crimp. I always leave extra wire when first cabling something. You can always cut later.

dcv
10-13-2013, 09:24 AM
You might be lucky and be able to twist the end back in place, but you should probably just get a new cable. It's only a few bucks. I can loan you my cable cutter, just pm me.

Btw you just need the shifter cable, not housing

hozn
10-13-2013, 10:16 AM
Yeah, if the derailleur is properly adjusted then I would probably do what dcv says and try to wind it back together. You could solder the end to hold the strands together or try to squeeze it all into a ferrule. I mentioned the cutters because the dedicated cable cutters are "v-shaped" so they compress the cable as they cut. Typically cables cut with proper/sharp cutters do not fray. At least that is my experience; I still need to remember to put a new ferrule on my FD cable (it fell off), but it has been a couple months and no fraying.

Vicegrip
10-13-2013, 11:21 AM
Unless I was expecting to pull the cable out of the housings and put it back in I would just wind the cable back together. The little crimp on fittings can sometimes be un crimped enough to get them back on if a new one is not at hand. Another trick is to use an electrical butt splice fitting. They have a plastic cover which helps coral the wires in and will fit over a frayed cable. Take care while working with the cable and more so when it is frayed out. Working on bikes, cars and fitness equipment over the years I can't begin to count the number of times I have stabbed myself on a cable wire. This reminds me that the cables and housings on the main bike are 5000 miles old and overdue for a change out.

I was a bike mechanic for a while back in the olden days. Now I am just a self confessed tool nut with an embarrassingly overly outfitted workshop. Considering all you do for others if you want a hand with this or something in the future I would be glad to lend a hand.

eminva
10-13-2013, 12:30 PM
Thanks for all your help and advice. I went to Spokes to get a new shifting cable, and when I explained the situation, the mechanic told me I could probably twist it back together. He gave me a handful of end caps. I carefully twisted it back together and slipped the end cap on (my fingers are little, at least that comes in handy for something).

I blame the frayed/too short cable on user error. I cut it at bike school and they had good tools, but it was my first time doing it so I probably screwed it up.

It seems to be shifting better than it has in a while, but I haven't taken it on the road test yet. Waiting for it to dry out a bit now that the bike is all shiny and clean. Adjusting the shifting seems to be the trickiest thing of bike maintenance (at least that I've tackled).

So, this weekend, I managed to:

-replace the chain
-adjust the brakes
-adjust the shifting
-change the water bottle cage
-replace the cleats on my shoes
-put the rack back on (poor man's fender -- I had it off since July but I cry uncle after this week)
-cleaned everything up while the bike was partially disassembled.

So, assuming the shifting works okay, I'm good! Thanks again.

Liz

hozn
10-13-2013, 06:25 PM
That is awesome! Just ask if you ever need to borrow any tools. I, like many others here I am sure, have managed to amass quite an assortment.

KLizotte
10-13-2013, 06:30 PM
Liz, I think you need to practice a just a little bit more to hone your skills. I humbly offer up my Cannondale (which is just like your's!) for more practice.

Some cleaning, lubing, massaging and you'll be a true pro in no time. Really!

ShawnoftheDread
09-27-2015, 06:00 PM
Wife: How come my rear brakes keep sticking.

Me: I dunno. I'll check it out.
http://images.tapatalk-cdn.com/15/09/27/83af2e673fa9e01ac33c8b532dcb4dda.jpg

notlost
10-15-2015, 07:49 AM
Yeah, if the derailleur is properly adjusted then I would probably do what dcv says and try to wind it back together. You could solder the end to hold the strands together or try to squeeze it all into a ferrule. I mentioned the cutters because the dedicated cable cutters are "v-shaped" so they compress the cable as they cut. Typically cables cut with proper/sharp cutters do not fray. At least that is my experience; I still need to remember to put a new ferrule on my FD cable (it fell off), but it has been a couple months and no fraying.

Superglue also works instead of solder. I hit the tips of my cables with the stuff (lightly) to prevent fraying (always loosing caps).