PDA

View Full Version : Total 200 -- Advice and Roll Call



eminva
06-18-2013, 05:09 AM
Hello --

Anyone else doing the Total 200 this year (July 6th)? I will be doing the 200 KM version -- life happened and I didn't have time to train for the longer 200 mile route.

Question for those of you who have done this before: what do you do about water? How frequently is water available on the course? I only have space for one water bottle on my bike at the moment unless I remove my air pump. I've seen cyclists with a rack for water bottles on the back of their seat post (I think) -- that's the only other option I can think of. Otherwise, I'm not too proud to use the Camelbak. Advice is appreciated.

Looking forward to it!

Liz

Steve
06-18-2013, 06:25 AM
I will be doing the 200 KM version -- life happened and I didn't have time to train for the longer 200 mile route.




You're riding 124 miles. I don't think this requires any explanation.

I'll defer to the triathletes here with respect to seat post mounted cages, as they are the folks who tend to use those the most. Some people complain that the bottle can bounce out, but most seem to really like them. Just out of curiosity, does your pump mount directly into the water bottle cage braze-ons? Or does it use a little pump holder that mounts onto the frame? I know with my mini pump, I can mount the pump mount and bottle cage into the same braze-ons, just might need long enough screws.

mstone
06-18-2013, 06:38 AM
Just out of curiosity, does your pump mount directly into the water bottle cage braze-ons? Or does it use a little pump holder that mounts onto the frame? I know with my mini pump, I can mount the pump mount and bottle cage into the same braze-ons, just might need long enough screws.

I've noticed more mini pumps that have a holder that mounts inline with the bottle braze-ons, rather than offset. This gives more flexibility if you want to mount the bracket to the top tube or seat stay, but sucks if you want to mount it on the bottle holder and still use a bottle. It doesn't seem to be a technical issue, as people still use the older offset mounts with the new pumps, topeak just seems to have had a Steve Jobs moment and decided that you didn't need that functionality.

TwoWheelsDC
06-18-2013, 07:48 AM
I bought a couple of Specialized Airtools (http://www.specialized.com/us/en/ftb/pumps/frame-pumps/airtool-road-mini-pump) for my road and commuter bikes. The packaging says they'll do 120psi, although I can't imagine how hard that would be on your arms. Regardless, they mount to the bottle cage braze-ons, while still allowing for a bottle cage. I haven't had to actually use them, but they seem well built and are barely noticeable on the bike.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3769/9074369279_37a494c8a6_z.jpg

Amalitza
06-18-2013, 08:13 AM
The total 200 is well outside of my current abilities, but I am a thirsty thirsty girl with small bikes.

The hybrid has a bottle cage on the downtube and I added a handlebar-mount bottle cage so I can carry two bottles without having to break out the trunk bag on the rear rack (which I do for longer rides).

That was my first set-up on the road bike, but I didnít much like the water bottle on the handlebars on that bike, so I went with http://www.profile-design.com/profile-design/products/hydration---nutrition/all-hydration/aquarack.html on the seatpost. Of course, that takes up the space where I previously had a saddle bag, so I got a Cage Box for the carrying of tools, spare tube, band aids, etc. I have one water bottle on the downtube, a second water bottle and the cage box in the two holders on the seat-post holder. It is an expensive piece of plastic-- itís intended customers are triathletes who will sell their mothers and firstborns for the promise of more aero-- but it gives me more water on the bike than I otherwise could carry. (the road bike is also better designed than the hybrid with a cage mount on the seatpost, but can only fit a small bottle there, while I want at least two large water bottles if Iím going to out for more than an hour. I REALLY donít like to run out of water or feel that I need to ration myself to make sure I donít:)).

Amalitza
06-18-2013, 08:19 AM
I'll defer to the triathletes here with respect to seat post mounted cages, as they are the folks who tend to use those the most. Some people complain that the bottle can bounce out, but most seem to really like them.

I've never had a bottle bounce out of the seat-post holders, while I *have*, more than once (and usually in traffic, just for fun) had bottles jump out of the downtube bottle cage.

I have not mastered any ability to actually drink out of the bottle behind me while riding. I drink out of the one on the downtube, and switch them out when empty.

hozn
06-18-2013, 08:24 AM
Hello --

Anyone else doing the Total 200 this year (July 6th)? I will be doing the 200 KM version -- life happened and I didn't have time to train for the longer 200 mile route.

Question for those of you who have done this before: what do you do about water? How frequently is water available on the course? I only have space for one water bottle on my bike at the moment unless I remove my air pump. I've seen cyclists with a rack for water bottles on the back of their seat post (I think) -- that's the only other option I can think of. Otherwise, I'm not too proud to use the Camelbak. Advice is appreciated.


I am doing it! As well as a couple of my coworkers/team-mates (Doug and I are doing the 200-mile version; another guy is doing the 200k version).

I have not done the ride, but I notice that the checkpoints (http://www.total200.com/The_Ride/Check_Points) are 20-30 miles apart. That is probably 1-1.5+ hours, depending on pace. That might be a little tight for a singe bottle (esp if it's hot). I typically budget 1+ bottles per hour on long rides/races. The suggestions here wrt mounting the pumps along side the cages are obviously very pertinent. I have the tiny lezyne pump (looks like similar in size to that Specialized pump that twowheelsdc posted) that I just keep in my jersey pocket.

dasgeh
06-18-2013, 08:36 AM
I see lots of people put a water bottle or two in their jersey pockets. Never done it myself, so I can't comment.

Another trick I've seen bike racers use: fill a long sock with ice. Stick it down your back. Bike in hot weather.

Tim Kelley
06-18-2013, 09:48 AM
My experiences based on last year when it was 105 degrees. Remember, I drink two or more gallons a day:

Water is plentiful at stops. I had two bottles on my bike and a third in my jersey pocket. I would drink heavily at stops and ration the two bottles between stops and use the third to cool me off. I wore all white sleeveless kit (http://www.flickr.com/photos/pedrogringo/7488205516/in/set-72157630389891398) that I had white long sleeve ballet-style shrugs I could put over and drip water onto from the third bottle.

Camelbak is a good idea. Also, make sure the hydrate in the days leading up to the event too.

Tim Kelley
06-18-2013, 09:50 AM
I've never had a bottle bounce out of the seat-post holders, while I *have*, more than once (and usually in traffic, just for fun) had bottles jump out of the downtube bottle cage.

I have not mastered any ability to actually drink out of the bottle behind me while riding. I drink out of the one on the downtube, and switch them out when empty.

I've had bottles rocket out and I've even had entire mounts crack and break apart under the weight of completely full bottles. Make sure to get something sturdy.

jabberwocky
06-18-2013, 10:05 AM
Regarding pumps, performance sells a little mount that bolts alongside a water cage. It allows you to keep the cage. I have a topeak mini-morph in mine and it works great (I added some duct tape to tighten the fit on the pump, but it has a velcro strap that gives additional security).

culimerc
06-18-2013, 10:08 AM
I'm in for the full 200. Hozn has it about right, water stops 25-30 apart, I'd definitely use 2 bottles and put the mini pump in the jersey. Overall, its only the 1st and last 20 miles that are any kind of hilly. Once you are away from the beltway, it just sorts of rolls along gently, but there is *no* shade, no place to hide, from the sun. So, hydration will be important.

For anyone who is interested I'm off to explore a new route on Sunday in the name of training. Wheels up from Loudoun Co High school at 8:30. I'm looking at doing a variation of this (http://ridewithgps.com/routes/669295). I'll probably cut about 15 miles off by not going into Middleburg, and just head to Bluemont at Snickersville Turnpike. There should be water and food available in Bluemont, Shepardstown, Harpers Ferry, and Point of Rocks, so every 30 miles or so.

Please let me know if your interested. Contact me here or off line.

Mark Blacknell
06-18-2013, 11:48 AM
I'm in for another T200. Thirding/fourthing advice to go for two bottles. Support is pretty great, but it's good to have a margin built in. If it's an especially hot day, I'd recommend making one of the bottles insulated. Ice + drink = incredibly helpful on such a long hot day.

Looks like an interesting ride, Culimerc. I'd be up for that, if I weren't going on a ride the day before (http://ridewithgps.com/trips/734398).

Megabeth
06-18-2013, 12:29 PM
Roll call! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gflUUZzhu_Y

I'm attempting the entire enchilada with Mark. And, would love to build a little train of folks (I will not be pulling any Tim Kelley heroics and am about surviving the day...)

Also, I have to do a 125 mile ride this weekend. Have no access to car so I'll be starting in Arlington and I don't want to build in any insane climbs. I will be most likely be riding by myself so will need easy and often water stops. Thoughts and suggestions appreciated.

mstone
06-18-2013, 12:35 PM
The total 200 is well outside of my current abilities, but I am a thirsty thirsty girl with small bikes.

The hybrid has a bottle cage on the downtube and I added a handlebar-mount bottle cage so I can carry two bottles without having to break out the trunk bag on the rear rack (which I do for longer rides).

Is there just not enough room on the seat tube? You can clamp a bottle rack on even if there are no braze-ons, unless (of course) it just won't fit. (Once upon a time, that's how they all were. :) )

consularrider
06-18-2013, 12:58 PM
Those both look much more challenging than my boring century (http://connect.garmin.com/course/3928810) this Saturday.

I did 170 miles of the Total 200 last year. You will need at least two bottles between the water stops if the day is sunny and warm. Last year I tried the "freeze a bottle" for the jersey pocket for both the Crystal Ride and the Total 200. I won't do that again. Too much melt running down along with the sweat where I didn't want it. I still ride with a smaller bottle in the middle jersey pocket as my third bottle on longer rides where I expect hydration to be an issue. I tried a behind the seat dual bottle holder (mounted on the seat rails). This configuration allowed me to still use a small wedge bag for spare tube and tools. However, I found my bottles were too prone to jumping out and getting in the way of the riders behind me. Also the bolts attaching the holder to the seat rails tended to vibrate loose. When I did the Ride Across Indiana (RAIN, 160 miles in one day), the road was littered with loose water bottles.

If you want to reclaim your second water bottle cage brazeons, there are options. The standard Topeak Morph pump holder can be zip-tied to the underside of the top tube. Topeak also sells a separate holder that mounts under the bottle cage (http://www.topeak.com/products/Pump-Replacement-Kit). I have gone back to using the Lezyne Pressure Drive (http://www.lezyne.com/en/products/hand-pumps/high-pressure#!pressure-drive) pump which comes with a bracket that mounts under a bottle cage or is small enough to be carried in a jersey pocket.

culimerc
06-18-2013, 01:29 PM
Roll call! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gflUUZzhu_Y

I'm attempting the entire enchilada with Mark. And, would love to build a little train of folks (I will not be pulling any Tim Kelley heroics and am about surviving the day...)

Also, I have to do a 125 mile ride this weekend. Have no access to car so I'll be starting in Arlington and I don't want to build in any insane climbs. I will be most likely be riding by myself so will need easy and often water stops. Thoughts and suggestions appreciated.

If you want to ride with me on Sunday, I've got space on the bike rack.

culimerc
06-18-2013, 01:33 PM
I'm in for another T200. Thirding/fourthing advice to go for two bottles. Support is pretty great, but it's good to have a margin built in. If it's an especially hot day, I'd recommend making one of the bottles insulated. Ice + drink = incredibly helpful on such a long hot day.

Looks like an interesting ride, Culimerc. I'd be up for that, if I weren't going on a ride the day before (http://ridewithgps.com/trips/734398).

I want to do that one too, the 16k feet of climbing seemed like a bit much for just 2 weeks before the Total.

creadinger
06-18-2013, 01:38 PM
I won't be riding it this year, but I definitely recommend 2+ bottles. I was out riding during some of the hottest days last year and my method was to put a frozen bottle wrapped in a small towel in my handlebar bag. On a hot day the airflow around a bottle mounted to your frame will make it warm water in less than 30 minutes. I get really sick of warm water after a while.

I like to use three bottles on hot rides - One for energy drink, one for electrolyte drink (nuun), and one for water so I can douse my head. When I finish the energy drink that one becomes water too.

Tim Kelley
06-18-2013, 01:51 PM
I want to do that one too, the 16k feet of climbing seemed like a bit much for just 2 weeks before the Total.

How much recovery time do you need? (http://bikearlingtonforum.com/showthread.php?5166-Garrett-Fondo-anyone&p=54642#post54642) What doesn't challenge you, doesn't change you!

culimerc
06-18-2013, 02:08 PM
How much recovery time do you need? (http://bikearlingtonforum.com/showthread.php?5166-Garrett-Fondo-anyone&p=54642#post54642) What doesn't challenge you, doesn't change you!

Let me hear you say that when your old and fat like me. :D

Tim Kelley
06-18-2013, 02:10 PM
Let me hear you say that when your old and fast like me. :D

Fixed that for you.

ShawnoftheDread
06-18-2013, 02:33 PM
Let me hear you say that when you're bold and fast like me. :D


Fixed that for you.

Fixed again.

Amalitza
06-18-2013, 06:46 PM
Is there just not enough room on the seat tube? You can clamp a bottle rack on even if there are no braze-ons, unless (of course) it just won't fit. (Once upon a time, that's how they all were. :) )

well... now that I look at it... if i take your suggestion a step further and used *two* clamp-on cages (one on downtube and one on seat tube) and moved the downtube cage up the tube from its current location utilizing the braze-ons, a small bottle would fit. But the braze-ons for the downtube cage put that bottle in the way of a possible bottle on the seat tube.

At this point, Iím pretty accustomed to my current set-up. If in the future I decide I need to clear out the space on the handlebars, Iíll keep this thought in mind.

DismalScientist
06-18-2013, 06:55 PM
Old touring bikes took an additional cage underneath the downtube. A clamp-on might work with sufficient distance between the crank and front wheel.

mstone
06-18-2013, 07:21 PM
Old touring bikes took an additional cage underneath the downtube.

So do new touring bikes. :)

vvill
06-18-2013, 07:36 PM
Some not-old touring bikes have three cage mounts too!


I have a somewhat unique pump mounting system - it's double strapped to my seatbag (elastic strap that's part of the seatbag, plus an additional velcro tie), and somewhat resembles an exhaust pipe (as part of the pump handle fell off ages ago; doesn't affect it). My seatbag has a QR mounting system and doubles for either my road or CX bike so it also "doubles" my pump, and I stash it in a pack or jersey pocket when riding my other bikes.

I'll usually take 2 water bottles (in cages) on any ride of substance and sometimes a third in a jersey pocket just in case.

I'll be giving moral support to anyone riding this. I rarely have much in my legs beyond 60-80 miles of a ride, so 200 (miles or km) is a feat.

I use the same kind of bottle cage on my bikes, they are "ELITE". Never had a bottle fall out. Comes in a ton of colours too
http://www.elite-it.com/custom-race/

eminva
06-19-2013, 09:24 AM
Thanks for all the advice! I have a Topeak mini morph pump; I will have explore other mounting options so I can free up the second bottle holder. Or just go with the Camelbak. I find I have a tendency not to drink enough when riding but I always drink plenty when I have that thing. Only one way to get the weight off the back . . .

Looks like this Sunday is the day for long rides! I hope to put in some distance but I have to kill two birds with one stone and ride a bunch of miles on the C&O to get used to that surface (I am not a gravel grinder veteran like so many of you). Also, I doubt I can keep up with culimerc and whoever is joining him. Have fun wherever you are going!

Thanks again.

Liz

Tim Kelley
07-09-2013, 03:40 PM
It's been a couple days so hopefully people have recovered enough to share their experiences on the Total200. I know the heat got to some people and they dropped out with worries about medical issues, and there were others that slogged on through everything, including getting lost in the last 10 miles.

I'd like to hear what people had to say, especially Hans and Hoofnagle! For those that dropped--are you going to do it again next year?

Here's the recap I put up on Facebook on Saturday evening:

"Day went well. Started at 4:30am with a ride from home to the start. Got into a big group of 25 or so that slowly whittled its way down to 3 other riders: a super strong Cat 1, a 120lbs climber from New England, and another Ironman. We averaged about 19.7 for the actual ride. (19.2 average including the ride to and from the start/finish) Had a nice ride home--all in all it was about 12 hours of moving time and 15 hours out. TSS of 525 at a FTP of 350w."

Here's the Strava link: http://app.strava.com/activities/65228786

3261

eminva
07-09-2013, 04:41 PM
First, serious congratulations to Tim and those of you who made it all the way. It was great to see culimerc looking so strong at the last rest stop. Congrats to those of you who even attempted it.

I rode 200 . . . um . . . cubits? furlongs? There must be some unit of measure . . . anyway, it was 102.7 miles (http://app.strava.com/activities/65232639). I took the 200K course and called it a day at the last rest stop. I was experiencing chills and was seeing stars, moons, clover and heffalumps by that point. Once I mentioned that to the rest stop crew they pretty much ruled out my continuing. The next guy who came in had to be carted out by ambulance.

It was hot and humid and I think this took a toll on many. I saw a lot of people calling for rides at each rest stop from the second one (49 miles) on.

I made a mistake and went too fast at the beginning. I lined up with the 17 mph pace group, but they were going about 20+ mph for the first hour. I hung on because I didn't want to end up alone. But I ended up alone anyway, for at least 70 of those miles. In retrospect, I knew then and know now that I could have ridden 125 miles on my own without a paceline if I had just stuck to my own pace. But I wasted too much energy, probably got a little dehydrated and couldn't pull it out when I needed to. Ironically, there were people I ran into at later rest stops that I probably could have worked with had I been in a position to. I can't bear to look at Strava to see how slow my last ten miles were.

Would I do it again? I have done a metric double (http://app.strava.com/activities/37570299) already, so there is no need to hit that benchmark. I might be interested in other long distance events, but I usually don't repeat the same event so we'll see.

In sum, it was a live and learn moment.

My smart alec brother suggested I redeem myself with this: HH100 (http://www.hh100.org/). Ha ha, younger brothers are so funny.

Liz

eminva
07-09-2013, 04:44 PM
Oh! I forgot to add a huge thanks to the organizers and volunteers. It was a very well run event for being a shoe string operation. Thanks to DaveK for volunteering and giving me lunch. Thanks to Chris and Jan, out there somewhere, who gave me a ride back to my car.

I saw a lot of official-looking photographers, so if anyone knows where we can see the pictures, please advise.

Liz

hozn
07-09-2013, 06:01 PM
Yeah, so that was something.

Very cool to see DaveK out there! All the volunteers were amazing, I couldn't agree more.

I think the fact that we've had little heat and that I typically do any longer rides in the early morning really did me a disservice on this ride. In general I have a hard time with overheating. I start getting chills, which is -- as I've been told, anyway -- entering dangerous territory. So that happened several times on this ride; had to pull over and sit down and spend extra recovery time at the stations. And I had continuous problems with legs cramping, despite consuming several dozen (!) of those electrolyte pills, doubling (then tripling) up the Nuun tablets in my bottle, and drinking several V8s (yum!). I don't know what I was doing wrong there, but maybe I'll try the vinegar/pickle juice approach next time. So a little frustrating to have my body shutting down on me, but I tried not to let that get in the way of having a good ride. I'm glad it wasn't a race, so I didn't feel any pressure to get back on my bike at the rest stop (other than, toward the end, to make the cutoff times). Of course, it was a much slower ride for me than Tim (and many others, I'm sure). I also made the foolish decision to ride from home, so not sure exactly how long on the course, but total time in the saddle that day was around 13 hours.

I rode with my friend Doug the whole way; he does much better in the heat and it was funny to see such a stark contrast in our performance comparing to feeling relatively evenly matched (he would claim I pulled him along, but that's just being generous) on our [cool-weather] century the weekend before. But having someone to ride with does make all the difference; I suspect I'd still be out there now if I was doing it alone. Doug is also great at organizing others (or extroverted enough to do so, or whatever that mystical quality is), so we had some great short-pull pacelines later in the day. That's always lots of fun.

Saw lots of people that were overcome by the heat or other physical tolls that sort of thing places on the body. One of the guys we had been riding with earlier in the day (who rode on ahead when Doug had a flat) was throwing up at the side of the road. We made sure he had plenty of water, phone, and gave him electrolytes. He called for help and we saw him at the next stop -- not doing any better, unfortunately. Hope he's all better now.

I loved riding back through southeast DC; it was so incredibly social and people were so friendly. It was different from the few other experiences I'd had in southeast and certainly different from what you'd expect based on nightly news (i.e. murders), and honestly that new perspective was probably the part of the experience I enjoyed the most.

So, I'm glad to have done the ride; I certainly enjoyed aspects of it. There were some really pretty roads in first and last 40 miles or so. I wish I had squeezed my camera in!

mstone
07-09-2013, 06:46 PM
I think the fact that we've had little heat and that I typically do any longer rides in the early morning really did me a disservice on this ride. In general I have a hard time with overheating. I start getting chills, which is -- as I've been told, anyway -- entering dangerous territory. So that happened several times on this ride; had to pull over and sit down and spend extra recovery time at the stations. And I had continuous problems with legs cramping, despite consuming several dozen (!) of those electrolyte pills, doubling (then tripling) up the Nuun tablets in my bottle, and drinking several V8s (yum!). I don't know what I was doing wrong there,

You may have overdone it with the electrolyte tablets.

Yes, I know, Brawndo's got electrolytes--but a little goes a long way.

eminva
07-09-2013, 08:20 PM
I loved riding back through southeast DC; it was so incredibly social and people were so friendly. It was different from the few other experiences I'd had in southeast and certainly different from what you'd expect based on nightly news (i.e. murders), and honestly that new perspective was probably the part of the experience I enjoyed the most.

This is great to hear. I love that part of the city and don't get there often enough; some great hills for cycling. If you haven't done it yet, you should do the WABA 50 States Ride and visit some more of that area. The residents I encountered were friendly and encouraging for that event, too. That's in the early fall so it's not so hot.

Sorry you had so much trouble but glad Doug was there to help. And congrats on gutting it out!

Liz

eminva
07-09-2013, 08:27 PM
There's something Tim forgot to tell you: he was in the first group that finished to 200 mile distance. Congrats!

Here he is coming into the final rest stop:

3262

Liz

KLizotte
07-09-2013, 09:54 PM
Errr, has anyone asked the hosts to do the race maybe a month earlier or in the fall so as to avoid the heat/humidity?

ShawnoftheDread
07-09-2013, 10:01 PM
Errr, has anyone asked the hosts to do the race maybe a month earlier or in the fall so as to avoid the heat/humidity?

I thought the weather was part of the point of the ride.

americancyclo
07-09-2013, 10:12 PM
After re riding the last half of Kill Bill this past weekend, I thought I should put the total 200 on my calendar for 2014. After reading these stories and remembering how Hans destroyed Jay Miller, not so sure again.

hozn
07-10-2013, 06:13 AM
After re riding the last half of Kill Bill this past weekend, I thought I should put the total 200 on my calendar for 2014. After reading these stories and remembering how Hans destroyed Jay Miller, not so sure again.

Naw, you'd be fine. I was in far better form on Kill Bill since I didn't have to worry about heat. Total200 was a good event. I probably won't do it again, but I'm sure I'll find similar ways to push myself -- maybe Diabolical Double next year. My only advice would be to do it with someone; that was really helpful.

I think ShawnoftheDread is right, though, the heat is part of the challenge here, so I don't think it would make sense to move the ride. And it sounds like it was a heck of a lot hotter last year, so at least there's that.

Tim Kelley
07-10-2013, 07:48 AM
Errr, has anyone asked the hosts to do the race maybe a month earlier or in the fall so as to avoid the heat/humidity?

Next year, for their 10th anniversary that are looking to make changes. Maybe a different ending location and maybe a different date. Although June can be pretty hot here in DC too...

Tim Kelley
07-10-2013, 07:54 AM
Total200 was a good event. I probably won't do it again, but I'm sure I'll find similar ways to push myself -- maybe Diabolical Double next year.

I did both this year. (And rode to and from the start of both) In terms of watts and kJs and all the hard data that a power meter can provide, they came out almost exactly equal in terms of work done and training stress scores.

Personally I think Diabolical Double was harder for me since I'm generally a bigger guy. Going up steeps hills is harder for me than dieseling through the hot, windy flats. Also, there was considerably more chafing from the "sit and spin" position I was riding in for the DD...

hozn
07-10-2013, 09:23 AM
Personally I think Diabolical Double was harder for me since I'm generally a bigger guy. Going up steeps hills is harder for me than dieseling through the hot, windy flats. Also, there was considerably more chafing from the "sit and spin" position I was riding in for the DD...

Yeah, I could see that. I like hills better, but would get just as burned up in the heat. I'd do more heat training next year if I decide to do a summer ride of that length/intensity.

Re: chafing ... yikes. :-) I'm only now finally recovered from the chafing of Saturday's ride.

Tim Kelley
07-10-2013, 09:26 AM
I'd do more heat training next year if I decide to do a summer ride of that length/intensity..

I feel like I got all my heat training for the season done in just one ride! Last night's TNR felt quite comfortable.

culimerc
07-10-2013, 09:28 AM
So apparently I was the only one of us that actually drove to the start (yea me!).

Anyways- I tried this 3 years ago, went out too fast it was hotter than it was this year and I completely blew up at mile 160. So my strategy this year was take it easy. not worry about the clock and just ride all day.

I spent most of the day riding with Mark and MegaBeth. Just cruising along. At one point Mark and I were just riding along blathering away at each other, turned around to check on MegaBeth, and there were 6-7 riders just pacing quietly behind us. We didnt see MegaBeth with us so we pulled over to wait and all 6-7 riders pulled in right behind us! (No really guys, you need to keep going....). So anyways, we stayed together until just after the lunch stop, when I rode ahead and missed a turn (again), but eventually met up again at the 147 mile rest stop. From there I went off by myself. My Garmin battery started getting low, so I had to turn the Navigation off, and since I didnt have a paper copy I started riding with folks for a bit then jumping up to the next person or group. I saw the guy Hozn saw throwing up, but by this time he was on the side of the road, leg just convulsing like it had an alien in it. I tried to pull him to the next rest stop, but that didnt work out so well.

So I tried to jumping from rider to rider again. Finally I got to rest area 8. The cramping/throwing up guy had beaten me there (he managed to get scooped up, Yea volunteers!!) Saw Dave K (Yea volunteer) who told me not to stop too long, I was on the time cut off. He gave me a cue sheet (Yea Navigation!!) and off I went.

Couple miles down the road I caught "Joe", who was sporting so much pink that even Dirt would be impressed. Pink Trails End Bike shop jersey, pink/black handle bar tape, pink socks, pink skort (yes pink skort) and a custom TI bike painted in a pink leopard print, of course buffed out with all pink Chris King hardware. He was a site.

So we finally made it to rest station 9, where there were 10 or so people that all ganged up together to ride the last 20 miles. Its 7:15 at this point. So, I'm thinking 1:15, 1:20 at the most, we should be done by 8:30. Nope. It took us 2 HOURS to cover the last twenty miles. We got so turned around and lost, oh well I've had worse times. And what people have said about riding through SE, we had the same experience. Some kids on a motor scooter rode with us for a while just Laughing and having a good ol' time. 2 little kids on BMX bikes decided we should race. They hung with us for alot longer than I would've thought they could. So, we finally make it back, and it was great having a cheering group waiting for us. Mark, MegaBeth, Hozn, Dave K. were all there (thanks guys!!) and my poor wife, worrying about me riding around SE in the dark. My brother was there too.

Overall, I couldve gone much harder. I was never in trouble and had plenty left in the tank at the end. I'll probably do it again, despite my wife saying that this is my last time attempting it. Next year, I think I might try the diabolical double tho.

consularrider
07-10-2013, 10:22 AM
Errr, has anyone asked the hosts to do the race maybe a month earlier or in the fall so as to avoid the heat/humidity?
I think one of the points of the timing of the ride is to maximize the available daylight to make 200 miles achievable for more riders without requiring lights.

This was my second Total 200. Last year I rode to the start with Dirt, Tim, and Mark, but skipped the Leonardtown to St Mary's segment and then rode home. That gave me 203 miles, but an additional two hours to finish.

This year I decided to drive to the start (two car family now and pacing myself because I'm still recovering from the sprained ankle). In the end I called it quits at pit stop #6 (mile 137). I still had energy, but was having shifting problems and on climbs it felt like my inner thigh wanted to cramp if I pushed it at all. In addition I am riding RAIN (Ride Across Indiana - a one day, 160 miles Terre Haute to Richmond on US40) this Saturday and didn't want to jeapordize that by overextending myself at the Total.

Would I do it again? Yes! I heard a number of comments both last year and this that people didn't like riding on busy roads. For me that's actually one of the attractions of the ride. A group of 20 to 50 riders heading down Pennsylvania Ave/MD 4 early in the morning is quite a thrill. In addition there were (mostly) good shoulders on the other busy roads and I never felt threatened by any of the motorized traffic.

ShawnoftheDread
07-10-2013, 10:49 AM
Reading the thread, it sounds like I have already have a 2014 goal. Heat, humidity, traffic... what's not to love?

dasgeh
07-10-2013, 11:17 AM
I think one of the points of the timing of the ride is to maximize the available daylight to make 200 miles achievable for more riders without requiring lights.


I get why they want to time it as close to June 20 as possible, but June is almost always cooler and less humid than July around here...

Congrats on 137 miles. Very impressive.

eminva
07-10-2013, 11:19 AM
I heard a number of comments both last year and this that people didn't like riding on busy roads. For me that's actually one of the attractions of the ride. A group of 20 to 50 riders heading down Pennsylvania Ave/MD 4 early in the morning is quite a thrill. In addition there were (mostly) good shoulders on the other busy roads and I never felt threatened by any of the motorized traffic.

Yes, I think this is a fair point that should be made to anyone thinking about the ride. How comfortable are you riding on busy state highways with 40-50 mph speed limits? Another lesson learned, I would put myself in the category of being comfortable with it and being able to do it safely, but not necessarily wanting to do it for eight straight hours. No knock on anyone, just know thyself.

Another thing: I haven't spent a lot of time in southern Maryland, but it was more hilly than I imagined. The metric double climbs over 6000 feet.

Good luck in the RAIN, consularrider!

Liz

P.S. to Culimerc: Per the official route (not including unintended detours), it was 25.4 miles from the last rest stop to the finish.

Tim Kelley
07-10-2013, 11:24 AM
P.S. to Culimerc: Per the official route (not including unintended detours), it was 25.4 miles from the last rest stop to the finish.

So about an hour right? :-)

TwoWheelsDC
07-10-2013, 11:28 AM
I feel like I could do this...at least physically. Mentally though, I don't know....I think I'd only try if I was with a group of people who planned to stick together. So I'll consider it for next year if there are others doing it at a relatively relaxed pace....200 miles at 18mph ain't gonna happen for me.

americancyclo
07-10-2013, 11:51 AM
I'm in! Although you need about a 14mph average (with no stops) to complete it in the allotted 14.5 hours from 6am to 8:30pm. Tim and Hans both averaged 18mph, so I think I could commit to a 15-17 mph average. Let's get a group together!

culimerc
07-10-2013, 11:57 AM
So about an hour right? :-)

Thats what I was thinkin' :)

Tim Kelley
07-10-2013, 11:57 AM
I'm in! Although you need about a 14mph average (with no stops) to complete it in the allotted 14.5 hours from 6am to 8:30pm. Tim and Hans both averaged 18mph, so I think I could commit to a 15-17 mph average. Let's get a group together!

If you want to get exact, my group held a 19.8mph average moving speed and a 16.4mph average total speed if you include the stops.

culimerc
07-10-2013, 12:01 PM
I'm in! Although you need about a 14mph average (with no stops) to complete it in the allotted 14.5 hours from 6am to 8:30pm. Tim and Hans both averaged 18mph, so I think I could commit to a 15-17 mph average. Let's get a group together!

According to my numbers, I averaged 16.8, and had almost 3 hours worth of stoppage time. There are 9 rest stops, so if you stop for 15 or mins at each it adds up fast, especially if you think about an extra long stop at lunch and that the stops get longer as it gets hotter and the miles start to take their toll.

Megabeth
07-10-2013, 12:16 PM
I did a total of 158 for the day (we rode to the start). Had to stop at rest #7 after the "dizzy and headache" kicked in and wouldn't go away. The fact that I couldn't keep the nutrition down was also a bit disconcerting. Rather than pushing to rest #8 and risk being stuck on the side of the road, I stopped when there was a bus. A bus with a/c. (Ironically, my SAG bus rolled in right when Mr. Tim Kelley was leaving the finish and biking home...)

I don't think I've ever dumped that much water on me, or in me, during a ride. It was hot with very little shade. I was fortunate enough to have two excellent people to draft off of the entire time. I have no idea how I ever would have done the ride without them. I basically stayed quiet, stared at their wheels, and pedaled.

Volunteers were also fantastic.

I'm not ready to say if I'm doing it again next year...

Tim Kelley
07-10-2013, 12:22 PM
I don't think I've ever dumped that much water on me, or in me, during a ride. It was hot with very little shade.

Oh right, my estimate was about 25 bottles of water/sports drink consumed during the 15 hours. And another 5 or so poured onto my white ballet shrugs to keep me cool.

Megabeth
07-10-2013, 12:24 PM
Yeah, but did you have ice poured down the front of your jersey so it landed in your sports bra creating what looked like "double-D"s for the next five minutes?

I think not.

hozn
07-10-2013, 12:27 PM
I'm in! Although you need about a 14mph average (with no stops) to complete it in the allotted 14.5 hours from 6am to 8:30pm. Tim and Hans both averaged 18mph, so I think I could commit to a 15-17 mph average. Let's get a group together!

Oh, I don't think I did 18mph, did I? Definitely only ~17 for the overall ride. Anyway, I was not anywhere near as fast as Tim, so let's make sure that's clear :)

Technically the group I was with missed the 8:30 cutoff (I think we got back around 8:40). Riding through DC at the end was a lot slower than I would have thought -- and we didn't make any mis-turns (though we had to double check at a few intersections). Lots of waiting at lights (that didn't have sensors aware of our presence), etc. But it's definitely doable by the cutoff time; we could have hustled a little more at the stops, but it hadn't even occurred to me that we'd be in danger of missing the cutoffs at our pace.

ShawnoftheDread
07-10-2013, 12:44 PM
I'm in! Although you need about a 14mph average (with no stops) to complete it in the allotted 14.5 hours from 6am to 8:30pm. Tim and Hans both averaged 18mph, so I think I could commit to a 15-17 mph average. Let's get a group together!

So the wife says if I do this she's going on a bender for an entire weekend. I'm not really sure of the relationship between these two activities.

TwoWheelsDC
07-10-2013, 01:14 PM
So the wife says if I do this she's going on a bender for an entire weekend.

Not sure if threat or thoughtful FYI...

Tim Kelley
07-10-2013, 01:28 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0VInMXs82xI

MB and MJ spotted at 1:23!

Mark Blacknell
07-10-2013, 01:32 PM
Saw that guy pull the plug at RS3. Immediately inspired me & Culimerc to get back on the bike and get moving. (DK, that's the jersey I was talking about.)

americancyclo
07-10-2013, 02:19 PM
So the wife says if I do this she's going on a bender for an entire weekend. I'm not really sure of the relationship between these two activities.

Both sound like fun to me!

Subby
07-10-2013, 02:51 PM
Kill Bill + Total 200 + Freezing Saddles + __?___ = Grand Slam of Local Endurance Biking for the Year. If you complete all 4 you get a bronzed banana.

ShawnoftheDread
07-10-2013, 02:54 PM
Kill Bill + Total 200 + Freezing Saddles + __?___ = Grand Slam of Local Endurance Biking for the Year. If you complete all 4 you get a bronzed banana.

Montgomery County Epic

GuyContinental
07-10-2013, 04:23 PM
Kill Bill + Total 200 + Freezing Saddles + __?___ = Grand Slam of Local Endurance Biking for the Year. If you complete all 4 you get a bronzed banana.

Hozn? They are calling for youuuuuuu.... Dirt opted out of Freezing saddles, did anyone else actually do all three? Tim?

Tim Kelley
07-10-2013, 04:27 PM
Did anyone else actually do all three? Tim?

Not me! I technically didn't do Freezing Saddles, I just showed up at the happy hour and gave out swag.

And instead of Kill Bill, I rode 300 miles of Blue Ridge Mountains that weekend. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gSqnmMoZEis)

I did do Diabolical Double though...

hozn
07-10-2013, 04:36 PM
Hozn? They are calling for youuuuuuu.... Dirt opted out of Freezing saddles, did anyone else actually do all three? Tim?

I think I will be ending the epic rides with T200 this year, given impending second child, but moco sounds like a good nomination.

GuyContinental
07-10-2013, 04:52 PM
I think I will be ending the epic rides with T200 this year, given impending second child, but moco sounds like a good nomination.

The key is "impending second child" once you actually "have" one your life is over for the next two years, but until then... Perhaps I could be convinced to pant, whine, moan (and encourage) behind you through the Epic...

hozn
07-10-2013, 04:56 PM
The key is "impending second child" once you actually "have" one your life is over for the next two years, but until then... Perhaps I could be convinced to pant, whine, moan (and encourage) behind you through the Epic...

Heh, you're right. I am pretty sure the MoCo is after Sep 15, though.

I would say "next year", but I don't know if I am ready to take on freezing saddles again just yet.

DaveK
07-10-2013, 04:58 PM
Saw that guy pull the plug at RS3. Immediately inspired me & Culimerc to get back on the bike and get moving. (DK, that's the jersey I was talking about.)

Going out on a limb... I think that's from when Geraint Thomas wore the white jersey at the Tour de France in 2010, since 2010's Sky kit at the Tour had green accents for their rainforest charity.

Dickie
07-11-2013, 07:16 AM
Going out on a limb... I think that's from when Geraint Thomas wore the white jersey at the Tour de France in 2010, since 2010's Sky kit at the Tour had green accents for their rainforest charity.

Pretty sure you're dead on Dave, the Skoda sponsor gives it away. Cool jersey to have!

dasgeh
07-11-2013, 08:35 AM
impending second child

Congratulations. Life doesn't end with #2. Sleep does.

hozn
07-11-2013, 08:48 AM
Congratulations. Life doesn't end with #2. Sleep does.

Thanks! Yeah, I expect it'll be a pretty big adjustment. And I expect my non-commute riding to be over for awhile. Looking forward to it, though. Another boy -- so he'll be getting a lot of hand-me-downs :)

dasgeh
07-11-2013, 08:53 AM
Thanks! Yeah, I expect it'll be a pretty big adjustment. And I expect my non-commute riding to be over for awhile. Looking forward to it, though. Another boy -- so he'll be getting a lot of hand-me-downs :)

It's not that bad. If you can stand the trainer, that's still an option during naps. Also, taking #1 out on the Weehoo is a great way to get one-on-one time (I know, not quite the same as training for the Total200 nonsense).

culimerc
07-11-2013, 08:58 AM
It's not that bad. If you can stand the trainer, that's still an option during naps. Also, taking #1 out on the Weehoo is a great way to get one-on-one time (I know, not quite the same as training for the Total200 nonsense).
There are no KOM points on Kidical Mass rides.

Tim Kelley
07-11-2013, 08:59 AM
It's not that bad. If you can stand the trainer, that's still an option during naps. Also, taking #1 out on the Weehoo is a great way to get one-on-one time (I know, not quite the same as training for the Total200 nonsense).

I've done the TNR pulling a trailer. Perfect opportunity for you to bruise some egos...

dasgeh
07-11-2013, 09:10 AM
There are no KOM points on Kidical Mass rides.

But I win all of them!

Time to lobby Strava for a "with kids" category.


I've done the TNR pulling a trailer. Perfect opportunity for you to bruise some egos...

Sydney is jealous -- she wanted to me to do the ride on the bakfiets last Tuesday. The Challenge Ride with the Bullitt was fun, though I only passed a few folks.

hozn
07-11-2013, 10:41 AM
I've done the TNR pulling a trailer. Perfect opportunity for you to bruise some egos...

I'm not sure if I'd take the trailer; perhaps if I was in the back, seems otherwise like it would be a little dangerous [for others mainly]. I would really hope that no one that far back in the group would have any issue with being passed on the hills, but you're probably right :) Maybe I'll do that next time; the weehoo on those hills would be a nice workout.

And, yeah, Dasgeh, as kidical mass organizer, has definitely KOM'd the general riding-with-kids challenge here.