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Tim Kelley
02-17-2011, 03:27 PM
In the past we've discussed movies, but I'd like to get some recommendations on bike related books. I've read a number of cycling/triathlon related training books which while helpful can be as boring a textbooks. I am looking for something more of the lighter side of things, like novels or well written biographies.

I just started reading The Rider (http://www.amazon.com/Rider-Tim-Krabbe/dp/1582342903) and am very much enjoying it.

I've also read Trizophrenia: Inside the Minds of a Triathlete (http://www.amazon.com/Trizophrenia-Inside-Triathlete-Jef-Mallett/dp/1934030449/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1297977586&sr=8-1) which takes a humorous approach and pokes fun at training and racing triathlons.

Does anyone have any recommendations?

acc
02-17-2011, 03:58 PM
I just started "Cycling," by Greg Garrett. A novel published in 1993.
I also like thumbing through "Boneshaker: A Bicycling Almanac."

Dirt
02-17-2011, 07:24 PM
Bob Roll's books... Bobke and Bobke II.

Amazing guy.

Mark Blacknell
02-18-2011, 08:57 AM
Three recommendations for three different tastes in pro cycling (which is definitely not the only kind of cycling book):

1) The obligatory Lance book - Lance Armstrong's War by Daniel Coyle. Written in 2005, it doesn't condemn, but it doesn't cover up. Probably the fairest book on him written up until that point. (I'm pretty sure the best Lance book has yet to be written).

2) Any collection of Sam Abt columns. Abt was a columnist/journalist writing about cycling for major papers since the early 70s. It lends *excellent* context to the issues we see in modern pro cycling.

3) The Giro D'Italia: Coppi Vs. Bartali at the 1949 Tour of Italy, by Dino Buzzati. A breathtaking book. You need not necessarily know the details of the story of Coppi (one of the greatest road riders ever) v. Bartali (perennial second to Coppi), but if you've some appreciation of the Giro, and *especially* if you can imagine what a devastated country Italy was in 1949, you will really enjoy this. The writing is just beautiful. I cannot recommend this enough to the right audience.

The first two books are in Arlington Central Library's collection*, and Buzzati's book can be special ordered. If the special order is backed up, I can lend a copy, but you have to be nice to it.

*I know Arlington has reciprocal privileges with DC. Not sure about other jurisdictions.

PotomacCyclist
02-20-2011, 10:55 AM
I haven't read them yet but "17 Hours to Glory" and "The Spring Classics - Cycling's Greatest One-Day Races" might be worth a look.

"17 Hours" has a separate chapter on each of several important figures in the history of the Ironman World Championships in Kona, Hawaii, from Julie Moss (whose struggle to finish the race as she fell out of 1st place became immortalized on ABC's Wide World of Sports and gave triathlon its first memorable television moment) and champions like Mark Allen and Chrissie Wellington to human interest stories like Sister Madonna Buder (Kona finisher when she was in her mid 70s) and Sarah Reinertsen (who finished Kona as an above-the-knee amputee). The book is about the human side of the athletes, not so much about the technical side of training although it's interesting to read that Julie Moss rode 340 miles on her bike the week leading into the Ironman championship. (Sport science and understanding of endurance training was obviously not very well developed at the time. Or at least Moss missed out on some of those lessons, but she still managed to place well among the women that day.)

"The Spring Classics" looks at the history and mystique of the famous one-day European spring races in the pro cycling calendar.

You can download and read the first chapter of both books from the publisher's official website: http://velopress.com/cycling_history.php

acc
03-09-2011, 12:59 PM
I just picked up David Byrne's memoir, [I]Bicycle Diaries[I], it is very good. This is the same David Byrne from the band, "Talking Heads." I like it because he talks about the connection between cycling and creativity. It is interesting.

ann

Seannmiller
04-04-2011, 12:21 PM
The giants of cycling (http://amzn.to/The-Giants-of-Cycling) by Jean Paul Ollivier

This book is a very inspiring overview of many of the past biking legends. It's packed with photos and great content covering many of the greatest cyclyst whom have become popular over the past 100 years of so.

jopamora
08-30-2012, 12:01 PM
Just finished It's All About the Bike (http://www.amazon.com/Its-All-About-Bike-Happiness/dp/1608195384/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1346345962&sr=8-1) by Robert Penn. A good story with a fair amount of bicycling history.

Brendan von Buckingham
08-30-2012, 01:03 PM
I second It's All About the Bike

Brendan von Buckingham
08-30-2012, 01:06 PM
Major (http://www.amazon.com/Major-Black-Athlete-Worlds-Fastest/dp/0307236595/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1346349828&sr=1-4&keywords=major+taylor): A Black Athlete, a White Era, and the Fight to Be the World's Fastest Human Being

A great story. Unbelievable how fast they went back then. And now I know what a Scorcher is.

MRH5028
08-30-2012, 01:59 PM
Even with everything going on, I still recommend It's Not About The Bike (http://www.amazon.com/Its-Not-About-Bike-Journey/dp/0425179613) by Lance Armstrong. A great story of recovery, and really worth a read if anybody in your life has dealt with cancer. Also a good amount of bike stuff in there too.

culimerc
08-30-2012, 02:20 PM
The last one I finished was "Slaying the Badger" which was one the better ones I've read. another that should be checked out is;
"Team 7-Eleven: How an Unsung Band of American Cyclists Took on the World - and Won" by Geoff Drake

krazygl00
08-30-2012, 02:48 PM
On the lighter side of things, the BikeSnobNYC books are great. I've read Bike Snob (http://www.amazon.com/Bike-Snob-Systematically-Mercilessly-Realigning/dp/0811869989) and it was very good, although kind of a re-cap of his blog. I have not yet read The Enlightened Cyclist (http://www.amazon.com/The-Enlightened-Cyclist-Two-Wheeled-Trancendence/dp/1452105006/) yet but plan to. I am a big BSNYC fan.

KelOnWheels
08-30-2012, 03:18 PM
On the lighter side of things, the BikeSnobNYC books are great. I've read Bike Snob (http://www.amazon.com/Bike-Snob-Systematically-Mercilessly-Realigning/dp/0811869989) and it was very good, although kind of a re-cap of his blog. I have not yet read The Enlightened Cyclist (http://www.amazon.com/The-Enlightened-Cyclist-Two-Wheeled-Trancendence/dp/1452105006/) yet but plan to. I am a big BSNYC fan.

Those are both entertaining :)

Grant Petersen's book is interesting, I also want to read Effective Cycling but the Kindle edition is $20.

I just started It's All About the Bike (downloaded it at lunchtime).

sjclaeys
08-30-2012, 03:24 PM
I greatly enjoyed the Bike Snob's "Enlightened Cyclist" and have been meaning to ask the forum for anyone's thoughts on his approach to bike commuting and commuting in general.

KelOnWheels
08-30-2012, 04:09 PM
I greatly enjoyed the Bike Snob's "Enlightened Cyclist" and have been meaning to ask the forum for anyone's thoughts on his approach to bike commuting and commuting in general.

Now I will have to re-read it so that I can properly answer your question :)

Megabeth
08-30-2012, 07:17 PM
Yehuda Moon (http://yehudamoon.com/shop/)

SilverSpring
08-30-2012, 07:51 PM
I highly recommend David Lamb's "Over the Hills: A Midlife Escape Across America by Bicycle." He's a really good journalist who took some time after writing a very vivid (if chilling) look at African crises ("The Africans") to bike across the land. He has at least three themes going: the demise of small-town America, biking, and bikes as a tool for changing American culture with their advent. It's an inspiring read with some practical hints (put your fifth of whiskey in the front pannier) and certainly worth the time.

KelOnWheels
08-30-2012, 08:58 PM
Just finished It's All About the Bike (http://www.amazon.com/Its-All-About-Bike-Happiness/dp/1608195384/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1346345962&sr=8-1) by Robert Penn. A good story with a fair amount of bicycling history.

Well now that I know the horrible death that awaits me should my handlebars snap on a 50 mph descent (as I have so many of those on my commute, you know) I will be sure to sleep well tonight and I won't be imagining that AT ALL on my ride tomorrow. Nope. Not ONE TEENSY BIT. Thanks, Robert Penn. :p

On the other hand, I now know that Tullio Campagnolo invented QR skewers in 1920-something, and that is cool.

krazygl00
08-30-2012, 09:41 PM
Just finished It's All About the Bike (http://www.amazon.com/Its-All-About-Bike-Happiness/dp/1608195384/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1346345962&sr=8-1) by Robert Penn. A good story with a fair amount of bicycling history.
Well now that I know the horrible death that awaits me should my handlebars snap on a 50 mph descent (as I have so many of those on my commute, you know) I will be sure to sleep well tonight and I won't be imagining that AT ALL on my ride tomorrow. Nope. Not ONE TEENSY BIT. Thanks, Robert Penn. :p

On the other hand, I now know that Tullio Campagnolo invented QR skewers in 1920-something, and that is cool.

Did you read the book in between the time jopamora posted and now???

KelOnWheels
08-30-2012, 09:47 PM
Did you read the book in between the time jopamora posted and now???

Well I'm only halfway done. I downloaded it at 2:30ish, read for a bit on my lunch break, read a little more on the Metro home. I read very quickly.

NicDiesel
08-31-2012, 07:59 AM
I read "The Immortal Class" a few months ago while on a layover. Not great but readable. I picked Up "Nerves of Steel" off of Amazon the other day for $15 but haven't had a chance to start reading it yet, though it looks great from the couple of pages I glanced at before putting it on the shelf.

Anybody here read "The Yellow Jersey"? That's next after I finish "Confederacy of Dunces".

thucydides
09-04-2012, 09:23 AM
Anybody here read "The Yellow Jersey"? That's next after I finish "Confederacy of Dunces".

Yep. It's a good read and certainly an easier and lighter read than Confederacy of Dunces. I also enjoyed Shield's The Race as well as his sequel The Tour, though Yellow Jersey is better. Fun fact: Michael Cimino tried to film the Yellow Jersey with Dustin Hoffman as the protagonist. In the end Cimino and the studio decided that adequately capturing the TdF in a movie was way too difficult.

Some other books:
Bike Cult by David Perry. This is an "all things biking" extravaganza. Some of the technical stuff is now dated but you've really got to admire how much information Perry packs in.

Bicycling Science by David Gordon Wilson. I love this book. It's full of rather technical physics, engineering, bio-mechanics, physiology, etc, so it's definitely not for everyone.

Right now I'm reading Road To Valor by McConnon and McConnon. It's about Gino Bartali's efforts against the Nazis. I've only just started it but it looks great.

Another fine, but grim, book is The Cyclist: A Novel by Viken Berberian.

As far as triathlons go, I enjoyed Iron War by Matt Fitzgerald. It's about the Mike Allen-Dave Scott Ironman rivalry. It's a controversial book because both Allen and Scott criticized it.

jopamora
12-14-2012, 09:17 AM
Just started reading Heft on Wheels (http://www.amazon.com/Heft-Wheels-Field-Guide-Doing/dp/1400052416/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1355498106&sr=8-1)by Mike Magnuson. About half way done and my biggest question is how did he do it with kids?

Mark Blacknell
12-14-2012, 09:35 AM
Picked up the book for its cover, didn't you?

Rootchopper
12-14-2012, 09:42 AM
Three travel books by (coincidentally) women authors:

The Handsomest Man in Cuba by Lynette Chiang
Full Tilt by Dervla Murphy
Miles from Nowhere by Barbara Savage

Steve
12-14-2012, 10:04 AM
Just about to finish "The Geography of Nowhere" by Kunstler, and absolutely loved it. While it might not techncially be a cycling book, it certainly supports it as a valuable form of transportation. On the whole, the book is more about suburban expansion and the development of cities designed completely on the scale of the automobile. It can be dry in some areas, but on the whole I found it really compelling.

Also love "Just Ride" and BSNY, as many others have commented.

Mikey
12-14-2012, 10:05 AM
On my wish list are: Momentum Is Your Friend (http://www.amazon.com/Momentum-Your-Friend-Pint-Sized-America/dp/1891369938)

and Mud Sweat and Gears (http://www.amazon.com/Mud-Sweat-Gears-Family-Adventure/dp/1891369946/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355501071&sr=1-4&keywords=blood+sweat+and+gears)

Vicegrip
12-14-2012, 11:27 AM
I am reading "The escape artist" by Matt Seaton. About a normal guy that gets the cycling bug and races early in life. He became a husband and father leading a normal life later. So far it is good. Have not found it in digital form. Free for the next BA when I finish.

thecyclingeconomist
12-14-2012, 01:08 PM
Josh Brandt's The Bicycle Wheel (http://www.amazon.com/Bicycle-Wheel-3rd-Jobst-Brandt/dp/0960723668)

Lennard Zinn's: Zinn & the Art of Road Bike Maintenance (http://www.amazon.com/Zinn-Art-Road-Bike-Maintenance/dp/1934030988/ref=sr_1_4?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1355512014&sr=1-4&keywords=Zen+of+bicycle+maintenance)

jopamora
01-05-2014, 12:34 PM
Picked up my cool bike (http://www.amazon.com/My-Cool-Bike-Inspirational-Culture/dp/1862059616) from the library. Haven't gotten too far into it, but so far it is um cool.

Toonces
01-05-2014, 07:57 PM
A Dog in A Hat by Joe Parkin - good read about an American pro in Europe and the good, the bad and the ugly that goes along with it.

PotomacCyclist
01-05-2014, 08:49 PM
As far as triathlons go, I enjoyed Iron War by Matt Fitzgerald. It's about the Mike Allen-Dave Scott Ironman rivalry. It's a controversial book because both Allen and Scott criticized it.

Mark Allen. I couldn't let that one get by.

FYI - I saw Mark Allen speak last winter at the Tri-Mania expo in North Bethesda. As part of the talk, he played video of the "Iron War" race with Dave Scott, pausing the video to comment on his thoughts during key points of the race. Very cool to see a legend analyzing the championship race in person.

Dave Scott visits the D.C. area too. A few years ago, he led an informal group run from Conte's (now Freshbikes) in Ballston, and followed up with a talk about endurance sports nutrition and training. That guy is still pretty fast. I couldn't keep up with him.

Subby
01-05-2014, 09:16 PM
I recently read Tyler Hamilton's book, The Secret Race (http://www.amazon.com/The-Secret-Race-Inside-Hidden/dp/034553042X), and really enjoyed it. Most of this is pretty new to me (I just watched the TdF for the first time this past year) and I thought Hamilton's account was fascinating.

Slaying the Badger (http://www.amazon.com/Slaying-Badger-Bernard-Hinault-Greatest/dp/1934030872) is next on my list.

thucydides
01-06-2014, 07:33 AM
Mark Allen. I couldn't let that one get by.

FYI - I saw Mark Allen speak last winter at the Tri-Mania expo in North Bethesda. As part of the talk, he played video of the "Iron War" race with Dave Scott, pausing the video to comment on his thoughts during key points of the race. Very cool to see a legend analyzing the championship race in person.

Dave Scott visits the D.C. area too. A few years ago, he led an informal group run from Conte's (now Freshbikes) in Ballston, and followed up with a talk about endurance sports nutrition and training. That guy is still pretty fast. I couldn't keep up with him.

Ugh. I can't believe I wrote "Mike." I've even met him. And Dave Scott turned 60 last week. My how time flies. (And yes he's still stupid fast. I don't think I could do his 2011 Savageman time with a souped up ebike.)

Rootchopper
01-06-2014, 08:10 AM
Try this one. A Novel about a a Grieving Loser on a Raleigh. The Memory of Running by Ron McLarty.

rpiretti
01-06-2014, 08:30 AM
Check out http://www.gagedesoto.com/collections/all for a number of books and magazines. They usually have good sales.

Just Ride by Grant Peterson is my fave.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk (http://tapatalk.com/m?id=1)

americancyclo
01-06-2014, 09:12 AM
I read Catfish and Mandala (http://us.macmillan.com/catfishandmandala/AndrewPham) a few years back and enjoyed it immensely. It was a great blend of cycling, travel, and Vietnamese history and culture.
http://jacketupload.macmillanusa.com/jackets/high_res/jpgs/9780312267179.jpg

mattotoole
01-06-2014, 06:40 PM
In case the unthinkable happens:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51LuW9WFK%2BL._SY344_PJlook-inside-v2,TopRight,1,0_SH20_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/Surviving-Crash-Rights-Bicycle-Accident/dp/1595719474

If you need a bike crash lawyer, he's local (http://www.brucedeming.com/).



History buffs or anyone who's spent time in SW VA might enjoy Fess Green's book. He was a nice man. We miss him a lot. Listen to Fess (http://withgoodreasonradio.org/2004/03/playing-basketball-cycling-west/) on With Good Reason from 2004 (starts at 18:27).

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/5112PcFHMmL._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

http://www.amazon.com/Wilderness-Road-Odyssey-Cyclists-Journey/dp/0936015942

adamx
01-13-2014, 05:05 AM
NEW: Bike Snob ABROAD
bicycling by david v. herlihy; basically the history of the bike
indurain: a tempered passion as translated by Javier Garcia sanchez with a forward by sean kelly

adamx
01-13-2014, 05:24 AM
the bike snob: abroad
the noblest invention with foreword by LA: an illustrated history of the bicycle by the editors of bicycling magazine
indurain: a tempered passion with foreword by sean Kelly by Javier Garcia sanchez
bicycle by david v. herlihy
next on my list: Surviving the Crash: your legal rights in a bicycle accident by our own Arlington Bike Lawyer: bruce deming

all are sitting on my shelf and I happy to lend out with a cycle promise to get it back..