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View Full Version : Never too early for winter- Lake boots sizing and advice?



GuyContinental
09-04-2012, 10:52 AM
I swore to myself during last winter that I wasn't going to get frostbite on my toes again this year (yeah, mild though it was it still got cold a few times). So, I'm looking at a set of Lake boots as my Christmas present to my feets or alternatively the super swanky 45Nrth boots (http://45nrth.com/products/category/softgoods) (that seem impossible to find). Does anyone have any feedback on the fit of the Lake's (I'm an average 44) and which model to look for? Anything else I should be looking at? I've used shoe covers for the last few years but they really don't play well with my MTB shoes.

Also, has anyone snagged a good deal on boots anywhere?

eminva
09-04-2012, 11:03 AM
I am also interested, and have a broader question. My old bike had pedals that were SPD on one side and flat on the other. In the winter, I just wore regular winter boots which were compatible with the flat side of the pedal. When I got my new bike, I switched to Look Keo pedals. These pedals are not compatible with street shoes. So I assume my options are:

1. Shoe covers (probably not a great option for my sensitive feet).
2. Switch the pedals so I can wear my own winter boots.
3. Lake boots (am I right that this would also involve a pedal switch because they would only be compatible with SPD?)

Am I missing anything?

Liz

jabberwocky
09-04-2012, 11:19 AM
I think the Lakes fit a bit big. Mine are the same size as my Sidis, and they definitely fit bigger (which works well, since I'm generally wearing thick socks anyway). The Lakes are awesome, but not super durable/well made. I bought mine in 2005, and they are in the "held together with duct tape and shoo goo" stage.

Didn't Lake pull out of the US market?

consularrider
09-04-2012, 01:26 PM
Guy: I can't speak for the brands you are looking at, but my Pearl Izumi winter boots were sized the same as they're regular shoes and are too tight when I wear mid to heavy weight wool winter socks. I think having a chance to try them on before buying is more important.

Liz: Swapping pedals is so easy, that would be my preference for my commuting bike. Of course, I've got SPD on all my bikes, so I haven't personally faced this dilemma. In addition, I find I'm much more likely to have to walk blocked MUP sections (think snow/rough ice after everyone has run/walked on it or it is too deep to pedal through) on my commute than I am if I'm out for a training ride on the roads.

vvill
09-04-2012, 02:23 PM
I splurged earlier this year and spent a whole $10 on clearance toe covers. I hope they do something - my toes never warmed up last winter, which was not so great on the longer rides. If they don't work at all I'll be considering boots as well. My other concern (if there is actually ice around this winter) is putting a foot down on ice when stopped (I have a bike ready with studded tires). I'm considering getting some grippier MTB shoes that take spikes.

Dirt
09-04-2012, 07:47 PM
I wear either a 45.5 or 46 in most road shoes. I wear a size 46 in Lake Boots and there's enough room for a little thicker sock. Lakes will likely be a little more difficult to get in the US. I don't think they import them into the US any more. You can still find them on-line.

If price is really a factor, get a good set of flats and use snow boots... or winter hiking boots.

GuyContinental
09-05-2012, 06:47 AM
If price is really a factor, get a good set of flats and use snow boots... or winter hiking boots.

Getting a *deal* is a factor, not price...

Are there other warmish reasonably stiff winter riding boots out there that I should be looking for? (I'll spray insulate and duct-tape my old MTB shoes before I ride 50 miles a day on flats)

vvill
09-05-2012, 10:20 AM
These (http://urbanvelo.org/dzr-h20-waterproof-spd-compatible-casual-shoes/) appeared at Eurobike recently. I might spring for them if the price is reasonable, I've had an eye on DZR shoes for a while, and I'm probably due for some new shoes. I have 2 pairs of bike shoes, one is a 6 year old heavy Shimano commuter with laces and the other a 10 year old pair of Specialized MTB shoes.

pfunkallstar
09-05-2012, 10:40 AM
I love my Lake CX140s - I bought them on Nashbar at the beginning of summer - DEAL! I wear a US 11-12 normally and a 46 allows for plenty of sock room. These things have made winter biking fun.

GuyContinental
09-05-2012, 11:33 AM
I love my Lake CX140s - I bought them on Nashbar at the beginning of summer - DEAL! I wear a US 11-12 normally and a 46 allows for plenty of sock room. These things have made winter biking fun.

Drat, Nashbar has them at a reasonable price but they only have little sizes (39-43) and 50. So, if you have itty bitty wittle feetses (or really big ones) you now have a way of keeping them warm. LINK (http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/ProductDisplay?storeId=10053&langId=-1&catalogId=10052&productId=516315&utm_source=Google_Product_Search&utm_medium=pla&utm_campaign=datafeed&cm_mmc=Google_Product_Search-_-PLA-_-Datafeed-_-Lake%20CX140%20All%20Weather%20Road%20Shoes%20Blac k/Red%2040&CAWELAID=1011808812&cagpspn=pla)

TwoWheelsDC
09-05-2012, 11:49 AM
Shoe covers and wool socks worked for me last winter, even on that one 17 degree day we had right after New Years. I had to ditch my first pair of shoe covers though (LG neoprene, don't remember the model) as they tended to funnel water into my shoes through the velcro in the heel, which totally defeated the purpose. I picked up a pair of the Pearl Izumi P.R.O.s that seem to work much better, for rain at least. I've eyed the Lakes on several occasions, but have been hesitant based on the middling online reviews and my reluctance to spend money on a third pair of cycling shoes that will only be used maybe two or three months out of the year. Now that winter is a season-in-name-only, I think I'm going to make do with my current setup (MTB shoes, thick wool socks, shoe covers), but I'm all too easily tempted by shiny objects such as fancy new winter cycling shoes.

GuyContinental
09-05-2012, 12:07 PM
Just ran across the suggestion to use SPD sandals plus neoprene or GorTex booties- apparently it works great in the super wet pacific NW winters because the sandals happily drain whatever comes their way while the booties keep the feet warm. Nashbar sandals are only $50... LINK (http://www.amazon.com/Nashbar-Ragster-II-Cycling-Sandals/dp/B004UMF6K8/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1346864441&sr=8-1&keywords=Spd+Sandals). Of course good Gore-Tex booties aren't cheap.

This solution probably isn't for me but could be done inexpensively for sure with 6.5-8 mil neoprene diving booties.

Amalitza
09-05-2012, 12:30 PM
Drat, Nashbar has them at a reasonable price but they only have little sizes (39-43) and 50. So, if you have itty bitty wittle feetses (or really big ones) you now have a way of keeping them warm. LINK (http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/ProductDisplay?storeId=10053&langId=-1&catalogId=10052&productId=516315&utm_source=Google_Product_Search&utm_medium=pla&utm_campaign=datafeed&cm_mmc=Google_Product_Search-_-PLA-_-Datafeed-_-Lake%20CX140%20All%20Weather%20Road%20Shoes%20Blac k/Red%2040&CAWELAID=1011808812&cagpspn=pla)

That was kinda mean. Like handing me some chocolate and then snatching it away at the last minute-- “nope, not for you”.:p

//don’t actually know my European shoe size without checking but as it turns out it’s 37.5 - 38//
//hate cold toes//
//should have known better than to trust a man’s idea of itty bitty feeties//
//really hate cold toes//

eminva
09-05-2012, 01:03 PM
No one has ever, ever, ever said I had "itty bitty wittle feetses" so thanks for that.

Did you notice the reviews for that product on Nashbar? The general tone seemed to be that they are good for "all weather" except cold weather. I know everyone has a different threshhold, but the OP seemed to favor a heartier option.

Upon further reflection, I think I'm going to switch the pedals and go with my winter boots again this year. If it ain't broke, don't fix it, right?

Liz

consularrider
09-05-2012, 03:20 PM
Actually, the Nashbar has a good selection of the Lake winter mountain shoe (spd - almost all in wide, which I think is good because of using heavier socks). The Lake road shoe (three bolt compatible) is "all-weather," and I know at least one rider in Denver who really liked hers even in the winter, but they are just neoprene vs. the true insulation of the winter boots (which are $90 more expensive), and those reviews are very mixed.

Dirt
09-05-2012, 06:24 PM
Actually, the Nashbar has a good selection of the Lake winter mountain shoe (spd - almost all in wide, which I think is good because of using heavier socks). The Lake road shoe (three bolt compatible) is "all-weather," and I know at least one rider in Denver who really liked hers even in the winter, but they are just neoprene vs. the true insulation of the winter boots (which are $90 more expensive), and those reviews are very mixed.
I've used the neoprene rain boots for 2 years and really liked them. They're not perfect, but they're a little warmer than normal shoes and do well in all but the most bucketing of rain storms.

eminva
09-07-2012, 08:47 PM
Liz: Swapping pedals is so easy

In theory you are correct, however, it didn't work out that way for me! I just attempted to remove the Look Keo pedals from my bike so I could put on flat pedals for my Confident City Cycling class tomorrow. I could not get the right one off for the life of me. I consulted a wide variety of web resources to make sure I was turning the correct way. No go.

So I'll be the one taking the Confident City Cycling class on my kid's mountain bike (the only bike around here with flat pedals . . . )

Thanks. Guess I will sheepishly head to the bike shop to get these things changed when boot weather rolls around.

Liz

Certifried
09-07-2012, 08:50 PM
I had a problem swapping my pedals once too. The right side is "regular" threads, the left is "left-handed" threads, so backwards from "lefty loosy righty tighty". I knew all that, but still couldn't get the pedals off until I bought a larger parktool pedal wrench so I could get the necessary leverage to remove them.

off2ride
09-08-2012, 06:47 AM
Lake shoes run slightly bigger/roomier that other cycling shoes. As far as frostbite is concerned, wear merino wool socks. I use tall ski socks for winter riding. Everybody has a different sweat level. If your socks are able to keep your feet DRY, then it won't be uncomfortable.


I swore to myself during last winter that I wasn't going to get frostbite on my toes again this year (yeah, mild though it was it still got cold a few times). So, I'm looking at a set of Lake boots as my Christmas present to my feets or alternatively the super swanky 45Nrth boots (http://45nrth.com/products/category/softgoods) (that seem impossible to find). Does anyone have any feedback on the fit of the Lake's (I'm an average 44) and which model to look for? Anything else I should be looking at? I've used shoe covers for the last few years but they really don't play well with my MTB shoes.

Also, has anyone snagged a good deal on boots anywhere?

ShawnoftheDread
11-19-2012, 03:10 PM
I picked up a pair of basic Lake winter boots (LX-140) on craigslist over the weekend. I haven't installed cleats yet b/c I still have flat pedals, but I wore them this morning and think they will work quite a bit better than sneakers this winter. A lot more vibration in my foot than sneakers, though.

Amalitza
11-20-2012, 10:35 AM
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=57565

Waiting on my porch for me when I got home last night. Unfortunately, I’m pretty sure I won’t be able to ride today or tomorrow, and I’m not entirely sure from the weather forecast how soon I’ll truly be able to judge their keeping the toes warm ability, but my feet did get nice and toasty pretty quickly when I tried them on inside the house. My initial impression is positive. Maybe I should put them on and soak my feet in buckets of ice water to see how long it takes them to get cold or wet?

More money than I wanted to spend, but I start crying about cold toes (and not cold anything else) when temps hit 50F even with my thickest wool socks and shoe covers, so if they’re warm, dry, and durable, they’ll probably be worth it for me. Cold feet is the first thing that'll keep me inside and off the bike otherwise. (or on the bike, but miserable, which really defeats the point for me)

Rootchopper
11-20-2012, 12:30 PM
Resist the temptation to wear thick socks. You need to trap the air around your toes and feet so thinner can be better.

Also, if your toes get wet (as mine do when I fetch my bike out of the backyard shed when the grass is wet) you're toes are going to be cold.

Other than that my solution is to wear Performance boots over my normal mountain bike shoes. I use flat pedals (but they have a cutaway bottom for cleats). On really cold days, I slip chemical foot warmers into my shoes.

I haven't worn the boots yet this year.

txgoonie
12-14-2012, 07:44 AM
Wasn't sure if I should start a new thread or tack onto another one. Anyway, thought some of you might like to see some early info about the winter riding boots some of us have heard about: 45Nrth Wölvhammer

http://gearjunkie.com/wolvhammer-bike-boot-45nrth

jrenaut
01-07-2013, 09:06 PM
I think this is as good a place as any to post this. Anyone have experience with Podium shoe covers? These seem particularly fun (http://www.podiumshoecovers.com/store/shoe-covers/pink-high-heels-shoe-covers).

jwfisher3
01-08-2013, 07:42 AM
I am also interested, and have a broader question. My old bike had pedals that were SPD on one side and flat on the other. In the winter, I just wore regular winter boots which were compatible with the flat side of the pedal. When I got my new bike, I switched to Look Keo pedals. These pedals are not compatible with street shoes. So I assume my options are:

1. Shoe covers (probably not a great option for my sensitive feet).
2. Switch the pedals so I can wear my own winter boots.
3. Lake boots (am I right that this would also involve a pedal switch because they would only be compatible with SPD?)

Am I missing anything?

Liz

Liz - I run Shimano SPD/flat combo pedals on my commuter, and the only solution I landed on as a possibility if I wanted to stay away from shoe covers, was to go with winter shoes, something like the Sidi Diablo GTX (mountain) or its equivalent, the Hydro (3-bolt) - the only problem is that they are expensive and hard to find. Colorado Cyclist used to sell them, but now carries Northwave, which have a nice price point (<$200) but are only available in "mens" sizes (does that matter?) I've punted, and stayed with my Sidi Dominators, until it gets too cold, and then I go over to my Merrell Goretex running shoes, which are very warm.

hozn
01-09-2013, 08:04 PM
http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=57565

I'm late to the party, but figured I would throw in my $0.02 experience. I have these Northwave Celcius boots too (got lucky & found them on geartrade for $80) and think they are a significant improvement over Pearl Izumi thermal shoe covers -- or Gore shoe covers. Everyone is different (I tend to be more wussy, I think), but I find these comfortable down into the 20s with wool socks for rides for 1-1.5-hour rides. For those 2+ hour rides at those temps, I find it tough to keep my feet (and hands) warm enough. I haven't fully tested the waterproof-ness of these shoes, but I've ridden them in rain & my feet stayed dry.

For me Northwave fit similar to Specialized shoes: they are wider than most. For reference, in non-cycling shoes I wear a size Clarks 12W (or Asics 13 [not-wide]); this translates to a moderately roomy Northwave size 48 (and Specialized 48 too, though I wish there was a 47.5).