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View Full Version : Is there a source online for specs for old bikes?



lordofthemark
08-28-2012, 08:42 PM
I'm mainly curious to find out how much the old mountain bike I've got weighs, but it might be something of more general interest

KelOnWheels
08-28-2012, 08:44 PM
http://www.bikepedia.com/

ShawnoftheDread
08-28-2012, 08:51 PM
It seems to be hard to find weights online consistently. Companies don't want to post them because so many things can affect the weight of a particular bike. Just stand on a bathroom scale holding your bike, and then again without it.

But bikepedia is the best source for other info.

lordofthemark
08-28-2012, 09:18 PM
bikepedia is definitely interesting but they don't seem to list Roadmaster.

Should I be very embarrassed at having this bike? (ultra terrain EXTREME, as it happens)

5555624
08-29-2012, 05:31 AM
Should I be very embarrassed at having this bike? (ultra terrain EXTREME, as it happens)

Around here? No, we just want people on bikes.

Around ELITE cyclists? Probably, but we don't care.

Around non-cyclists? I don't know, if they see me wearing lycra, they've gone blind and can't see the bike.

lordofthemark
08-29-2012, 08:19 PM
It seems to be hard to find weights online consistently. Companies don't want to post them because so many things can affect the weight of a particular bike. Just stand on a bathroom scale holding your bike, and then again without it.

But bikepedia is the best source for other info.

okay tried that. First thing I learned is that I need to bike more, and be a bit a more sensible in my eating than I have been lately.

Second thing - bike is about 35 or 36 pounds (including small pouch, bell, and mirror, but without water bottle) Could that be right?

ShawnoftheDread
08-29-2012, 08:30 PM
okay tried that. First thing I learned is that I need to bike more, and be a bit a more sensible in my eating than I have been lately.

Second thing - bike is about 35 or 36 pounds (including small pouch, bell, and mirror, but without water bottle) Could that be right?


Sure, sounds right. My hybrid is 31 lbs. Next time you're pedaling your tank up a hill, just think how fast and strong you'll feel when you're on a 20 pound road bike sometime in the future.

KelOnWheels
08-29-2012, 09:11 PM
Yup. I just weighed my bike and it's 35.4 lbs with rack & seat bag.

Oh wait, the U-lock was on it. So about 34 lbs.

vvill
08-30-2012, 07:07 AM
I think my beater MTB with studded tires on is about 35lbs. I rode it on the W&OD once on a non-studded tire worthy day. It was fun.

Tim Kelley
08-30-2012, 07:24 AM
The daily commuter is 42.4 lbs without the baby. Add her to the back and its closer to the 75-80lbs range.

Tim Kelley
08-30-2012, 08:09 AM
The daily commuter is 42.4 lbs without the baby. Add her to the back and its closer to the 75-80lbs range.

Oh, and this morning, someone went and put an extra 200 lbs of dead weight on the saddle!

jabberwocky
08-30-2012, 08:36 AM
I occasionally use the wayback machine for specs on semi-new bikes that are no longer on their mfgs website (or for companies that are no longer around, like Lemond).

Bike weight is something you will hardly ever find though. Nobody publishes total bike weight.

Amalitza
08-30-2012, 09:33 AM
My aluminum hybrid is 28 pounds (with rear rack, but no luggage). I remember thinking when I bought it how amazingly light it was. The bike it replaced was much heavier.

jabberwocky
08-30-2012, 09:42 AM
My monster truck MTB (170mm fork, 160mm rear travel, thru-axle front and rear, dropper seatpost, DH brakes) weighs about 29 pounds. Its just over 28 with the thomson post in place of the Reverb. :eek:

My road bike is right at 15.

Bilsko
08-30-2012, 09:49 AM
For older model Schwinns, this is the resource I use - it used to be hosted by Schwinn, but for some reason the 'official' forums were discontinued. Now its an independent set of forums.

http://www.schwinnbikeforum.com/SLDB/Cover.htm

DaveK
08-30-2012, 10:37 AM
I have no idea what my bikes weigh. The cross bike with all the commuter stuff on it weighs a lot. The road bike weighs much less.

A great resource for those of the Crack-n-fail persuasion (like me) is vintagecannondale.com - even Cannondale themselves direct you there for old info on their bikes.

lordofthemark
08-30-2012, 11:35 AM
Sure, sounds right. My hybrid is 31 lbs. Next time you're pedaling your tank up a hill, just think how fast and strong you'll feel when you're on a 20 pound road bike sometime in the future.



see thats actually why I wanted to know the weight

1. To better inform my bike buying strategy - since I will want a bike eventually for commuting (pentagon metro to M Street SE) AND for weekend rides on the W&OD, etc, I might not get a 20 lb road bike, and I wanted to see where Im starting at, relative to what I might get

2. I also want excuses (aside from fitness level and biking inexperience) for my current slow speeds

Is the weight the only thing about this bike that might be slowing me down? I would think a road or city bike would also be faster due to different tires - is that the case, holding weight equal? Are there other factors?

KelOnWheels
08-30-2012, 07:51 PM
Yup, tire size & rolling resistance get all up in there - as i understand it my wee 26" tires do not go as far or as fast as 700C tires would, other stuff being equal.

Certifried
08-30-2012, 08:49 PM
Here are some interesting graphs on tire resistances.

http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/rolres.html

For me, needing to lose about 30 pounds, I won't bother spending too much time or money on trying to get my bike more ELITE. If I get down to my ultimate body weight, then I'll worry about all that

vvill
08-30-2012, 08:56 PM
I don't think the difference between 26" and 700c tires would be that significant, assuming the same tire compound/tread/width. But 20" wheels vs 700c, now there's a difference!

Rider position and frame dimensions/design affect aerodynamics and how easily you can transfer your power to the bike, which influence how fast you can go. (The greatest influence though, is of course the rider.)

Sometimes just having a 20lb road bike makes you feel like riding more. If I go back to my hybrid or MTB I'll ride faster than I used to because I've ridden more + ridden harder since getting the road bike.

KelOnWheels
08-30-2012, 09:07 PM
I don't think the difference between 26" and 700c tires would be that significant, assuming the same tire compound/tread/width.

Oh, true, I wasn't thinking about width. 23mm tires would be all cute in 26" :D

lordofthemark
08-30-2012, 09:43 PM
Here are some interesting graphs on tire resistances.

http://www.terrymorse.com/bike/rolres.html

For me, needing to lose about 30 pounds, I won't bother spending too much time or money on trying to get my bike more ELITE. If I get down to my ultimate body weight, then I'll worry about all that

Ah, I was afraid someone would say something like this, but the laws of physics I guess care as much about my weight (about 12 to 15 pounds over what I would like based on that hop on the scale to weigh the bike) as the weight of the bike.

And I guess I will lose weight as fast or faster riding the MTB, though I won't get as far in the time I have for riding.

KelOnWheels
08-30-2012, 10:40 PM
To cross threads for a moment (hopefully that's not like crossing the streams), this bit on wheel weight I've just read in It's All About The Bike is interesting:

"As wheels are accelerated round as well as forward, the mass of rotating parts is doubled, for the purposes of calculating acceleration. So if a 22 lb bike has 13 lb fixed mass and 9 lb rotating mass, the effect will amount to 31 lb."

Amalitza
08-31-2012, 08:25 AM
I got my road bike a couple months ago. Much to my dismay:rolleyes:, merely the act of purchasing the road bike did not make me magically fast-- so far, Iím maybe about 1/2 mph faster on the road than the hybrid. However, now that Iím getting used to the thing, Iím more comfortable on the road bike leaning forward to pedal hard, and can do it for longer without stressing out my shoulders as much, so I anticipate getting faster due to being able to work harder longer. Or some such.

Admittedly, I think my hybrid is basically a road bike with flat bars and better granny gears, so you may find a lot more difference going from a mountain bike to road bike than I did.