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bluerider
07-10-2012, 01:18 PM
Hey everyone,
I just got some Vittoria Randonneur Hypers. I really like the tires but the reflective strip looks stupid and I want to remove it. Anyone have any recommendations on how to rid myself of this? I don't ride at night so I don't care about the safety aspect. I have not mounted the tires yet.

GuyContinental
07-10-2012, 01:22 PM
Not one that isn't going to destroy your tires... I'm sure that some sort of solvent would take it off but that same solvent would eat the sidewall too. Perhaps you could sand it off with 200 grit sandpaper (but that too would eat your sidewall)

americancyclo
07-10-2012, 01:22 PM
mine started peeling off my Conti GP4000's after about a year and a half, but maybe you can't wait that long.

5555624
07-10-2012, 01:28 PM
A can of paint and a brush?

bluerider
07-10-2012, 01:31 PM
I was thinking a heat gun and exacto knife.....

consularrider
07-10-2012, 01:41 PM
And I bought some of those (and some Michelin PiLOTs and Schwables) just to get the reflective strip for my after dark commutes.....

KLizotte
07-10-2012, 02:19 PM
Hey everyone,
I just got some Vittoria Randonneur Hypers. I really like the tires but the reflective strip looks stupid and I want to remove it. Anyone have any recommendations on how to rid myself of this? I don't ride at night so I don't care about the safety aspect. I have not mounted the tires yet.

They really won't be noticeable when you mount them. From a safety standpoint, I say leave them on. You'll ride during dusk at some point if not total darkness.

dasgeh
07-10-2012, 02:39 PM
From a safety standpoint, I say leave them on. You'll ride during dusk at some point if not total darkness.

Don't forget about tunnels and really ominous rain storms...

Riley Casey
07-10-2012, 05:04 PM
Really? Think the reflective strip on my Michelin City tyres is the coolest thing about them. You should take your bike out in the dark at least once to get that 'riding on ghostly circles' effect for some poor driving sod.

( no, i'm not a Brit but my tires are thus they are tyres )

brendan
07-10-2012, 05:23 PM
Does Vittoria make a non-reflective variant of those tires? If they are relatively new, might make more sense to buy the other version and sell the ones you have at half price or so. That reduces any risk of making your tires a total loss and/or a safety hazard (<snark>aside from the lack of reflective trim :) </snark>).

Brendan

jnva
07-10-2012, 05:48 PM
Definitely remove those strips. Weight reduction totally worth it IMHO!

consularrider
07-10-2012, 06:49 PM
Of course, what size are they? Maybe we can trade for my gently used Nashbar Prima Plus 700x25? They're blackwalls. ;)

vvill
07-10-2012, 07:15 PM
I love the reflective strips on my 20x1.5 Marathon Racers.

Every time I go under one of the tunnels in around 4MR I'm grateful when a person in front of me (or coming the other way) has something reflective on them or their bike. Especially when your eyes are adjusted for bright sunshine. Of course, tire sidewalls wouldn't be really useful in this situation.

bluerider
07-10-2012, 08:30 PM
I know its small potatoes but they are going to look stupid on my bike and it will drive me crazy everything I look at them. They are new and unmounted so I will just return them for a refund. I had seen pictures of these tires with a much darker strip than these tires have and thought they would be ok. However, they are much brighter than the pictures. Almost like white walls. The reflective strip just annoys me.

off2ride
07-10-2012, 09:33 PM
I was gonna say...the only way to get rid of the reflective strip is to get rid of those tires. Sanding and chemicals is not the way to go since bike tires are not as durable as car tires. They don't have to be. What about fenders that say "Back off" with an image of Yosemite Sam toting 2 handguns? Those are trick.

GuyContinental
07-11-2012, 06:50 AM
I was gonna say...the only way to get rid of the reflective strip is to get rid of those tires. Sanding and chemicals is not the way to go since bike tires are not as durable as car tires. They don't have to be.

FWIW- don't ever sand or apply chemicals to a car tire either (including any petroleum or silicone-based "tire shine") Really. Don't do it.

dasgeh
07-11-2012, 08:23 AM
I know its small potatoes but they are going to look stupid on my bike and it will drive me crazy everything I look at them. They are new and unmounted so I will just return them for a refund. I had seen pictures of these tires with a much darker strip than these tires have and thought they would be ok. However, they are much brighter than the pictures. Almost like white walls. The reflective strip just annoys me.

If you ride outside, they're not going to stay white for long. I imagine some of the pictures are from bikes that have been taken out on the road. But if you don't like them, return or paint them...

bluerider
07-11-2012, 09:15 AM
If you ride outside, they're not going to stay white for long. I imagine some of the pictures are from bikes that have been taken out on the road. But if you don't like them, return or paint them...

I have them boxed up for return. Probably go with a Conti Gatorskin (700x32, wire bead) or Conti GP 4 season (700X28, folding bead) Try to figure out which to go with. I like the 700X32 size but hate wire beads. The GP 4 Season is a folding bead and almost 100 grams lighter but a narrower tire which I don't like. Back to the drawing board of which compromises I am willing to make.

bluerider
07-11-2012, 11:54 AM
So I boxed up the Vittoria's and sent them out. I doesn't appear they are available without the reflective strip unless its a special order. Since I am switching from Hutchinson Toro CXs (700X32, a knobby cross tire) to a more road friendly tire to ride some Centuries and train with, I decided narrower and lighter are better. So I just ordered some Conti Grand Prix 4 seasons in 700x28. They should be fairly durable (similar to Gatorskins), lighter than the Vittoria's or Gatorskins, have a folding bead while being wide enough for gravel trails and such on occasion. Plus, I still have Hutchinson's available to me if the need for a more off-road tire comes up. Oh and they the don't have the reflective sidewall. I think I made a reasonable choice. If only they made Gatorskins in 700x32 with a folding bead.

Thanks for everyone's opinions and advice. Sorry for being an overly anal crazy cyclist about tires.

DaveK
07-11-2012, 04:04 PM
So I boxed up the Vittoria's and sent them out. I doesn't appear they are available without the reflective strip unless its a special order. Since I am switching from Hutchinson Toro CXs (700X32, a knobby cross tire) to a more road friendly tire to ride some Centuries and train with, I decided narrower and lighter are better. So I just ordered some Conti Grand Prix 4 seasons in 700x28. They should be fairly durable (similar to Gatorskins), lighter than the Vittoria's or Gatorskins, have a folding bead while being wide enough for gravel trails and such on occasion. Plus, I still have Hutchinson's available to me if the need for a more off-road tire comes up. Oh and they the don't have the reflective sidewall. I think I made a reasonable choice. If only they made Gatorskins in 700x32 with a folding bead.

Thanks for everyone's opinions and advice. Sorry for being an overly anal crazy cyclist about tires.

You'll like those tires. GP4000s are my go-to road tire and those are very similar. They grip well and are fairly puncture-resistant. They have excellent longevity too.

off2ride
07-11-2012, 07:55 PM
I've met a few reps from Michelin and Dunlop through the years and they have never said NOT to put tire shine on the side walls. I'm not sure where you get your info from but on that note, I've also seen severe dry rotting from tires that never had the conditioner put on it. Car tires are tougher than you think. Bike tires on the other hand are not as tough. That's why your local LBS uses the mildest cleaner to scrub them clean.


FWIW- don't ever sand or apply chemicals to a car tire either (including any petroleum or silicone-based "tire shine") Really. Don't do it.

GuyContinental
07-12-2012, 07:25 AM
I've met a few reps from Michelin and Dunlop through the years and they have never said NOT to put tire shine on the side walls. I'm not sure where you get your info from but on that note, I've also seen severe dry rotting from tires that never had the conditioner put on it. Car tires are tougher than you think. Bike tires on the other hand are not as tough. That's why your local LBS uses the mildest cleaner to scrub them clean.

Odds of this are indeed slim given that I prefer bikes to cars, but I (currently) happen to run a tire company. ;)

Guidance from the Tire Industry Association is clear: "Don't use petroleum- or silicone-based tire shines/cleaners. Most people don't realize that some of the most popular tire shines and cleaners on the market have a negative effect on the additives that tire manufacturers use in tires to help prevent ozone damage or dry rot." As a matter of corporate policy we won't sell or advise customers to use anything but water-based shine (it's also dangerous for my technicians because it makes the sidewall of the the tire extremely slick). Additionally, the rep that you talked to was ill-informed- use of tire dressing with petroleum distillates will absolutely void many manufacturer warranties (where the damage is related) including Michelin. LINK to Michelin Manual (http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=4&ved=0CG0QFjAD&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.michelinman.com%2Fmediabin%2F Approved%2FMichelin%2FVisuals%2FDigital%2F1-1_Owners-Manual.pdf&ei=GMD-T5GHI6W26wG59ZnBBg&usg=AFQjCNFJbk_WKk6WFA6sI5Di9FweO8Dgqg)