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Megabeth
06-20-2012, 02:07 PM
I have a friend that carries more "personal items" (e.g., chapstick, sunscreen, little mirror, etc.) than actual bike equipment in her little underseat seat pouch. I nearly lost an eyeball from rolling them so hard after seeing that. I advised that she might want to consider a spare tube, at the very least...which brings me to this question:

What do you carry at all times with you in your seat pouch (or backpack or pannier)? What do you recommend someone have at all times...and what's "nice to have"?

As a side story, we had a friend have her seat pouch stolen in Clarendon (ironically we were mere steps away eating lunch). She shrugged and basically said that the only things in there that would be useful would be for a cyclist...and a cyclist wouldn't do steal another cyclist's pouch in the first place. So, the thief was the one that ended up getting screwed in that deal...

GuyContinental
06-20-2012, 02:14 PM
I dunno- I keep $50 cash in mine (in case of emergency cab or round of drinks) but then again I never leave that bike unattended.

Other necessities?
Toolkit with chain tool
Quicklink
Tube
Inflator of some kind
Patch kit
Tire lever (1)
Ziplock (for phone in the rain)
ICE (in case of emergency) Card with blood type and contact info

That's in a tiny, very carefully packed, saddle bag

txgoonie
06-20-2012, 02:14 PM
I generally get the smallest pouch that I can find, which will fit my must haves:
- tube
- patch kit
- multi tool
- tire lever
- CO2 inflator and cartridge
- Couple dollars

I also generally carry a pump in my bag or jersey. My phone is fast becoming a must have. I feel weird if I don't have it with me now. And while it's not in my seat bag, I wear a Road I.D. and think you need to have some kind of identification on you at all times.

And at this time of year - a water bottle!

ShawnoftheDread
06-20-2012, 02:18 PM
Extra tube, patch kit, multi-tool with tire lever, and lube. Pump goes in my regular bag. I haven't needed them for myself since I've started carrying them, but used them trying to rescue a folding bike during Tour de Fat. Small sunscreen sounds like a good idea, though.

DismalScientist
06-20-2012, 02:18 PM
Absolutely nothing.

In the pocket of my khakis:
Cell phone
Wallet
Smartrip card

ShawnoftheDread
06-20-2012, 02:20 PM
Oh, and chain tool and quick link too.

TwoWheelsDC
06-20-2012, 02:24 PM
Both my bikes have a spare tube, levers, CO2 pump w/2 cartridges, a mini-tool, and a valve adapter in a wedgie bag. When riding my commuter to work or around town, I almost always carry my pannier, which always carries a mini-pump, 10mm wrench (fits my skewers and fender bolts), Leatherman tool, extra batteries, zip ties, bungee straps, and yet another spare tube.

RESTONTODC
06-20-2012, 03:18 PM
All the above plus bandages (small and big), Antiseptic wipes and medical tapes.

There is no need to call 911 when you get a road rash.

jabberwocky
06-20-2012, 03:26 PM
Spare tube, patch kit, small multitool. I have a mini-morph pump attached to the bike. On long road rides, I also stuff my drivers license, credit card, house key and phone in there (since I have a strange aversion to jerseys with pockets).

rcannon100
06-20-2012, 03:32 PM
Yeah, I have carried a first aid kit, but I am not sure what to put in it. Gauze, antiseptic, and tape makes sense.

One thing - I downloaded a red cross first aid app to my itouch. You can also download a bike repair app but I am not sure how good they are.

One thing not mentioned is a "boot" I believe it is called. This is basically a tire (not a tube) patch - say in case of a puncture. Doesnt weigh much.

+1 for a plastic bag. Doesnt weigh anything; and can save electronics if you get caught in a thunder boomer.

I also recommend a camera. A camera built into a phone is just fine. If you get into an accident, take lots of pictures. If you claim you rode a century out the W&OD, take lots of pictures - we demand proof (and wanna see the fun)! :D

Mark Blacknell
06-20-2012, 03:58 PM
Benedryl.

PotomacCyclist
06-20-2012, 04:18 PM
Spare tube, patch kit, bike multitool, chain link tool, tire levers, tire boot (thin and flat, smaller than a credit card), individual antiseptic wipe. I think that's it.

I have a frame pump attached to the seat tube. CO2 cartridge and adapter for the tri bike (but not for the MTB).

I have a separate velcro bento box on the top tube, which I use for carb chews (GU Chomps, Clif Shots), ID and Kleenex packs in the winter.

Two water bottle cages on the tri bike, one on the MTB.

KelOnWheels
06-20-2012, 04:19 PM
Spare tube
Tire levers
Patch kits - one w/ glue and one without
Multi-tool
Key for U-lock (when it's not in use)

I stash my blinky tail light in there when I'm not riding too.

Frame pump is on the downtube next to the water bottle. Got one of those velcro cable ties holding it on so it doesnt fly off at inopportune moments.

I used to carry a decent-sized first aid kit from REI that velcroed very nicely to my top tube when I was chasing marathon trainees out on the trails - I need to make a little tiny one to carry for personal use. A ziplock with a couple of wet wipes would be nice to have as well - I didn't have any with me the other day when my chain fell off and I had to ride around all greasy.

5555624
06-20-2012, 04:21 PM
What do you carry at all times with you in your seat pouch (or backpack or pannier)?

Since the bike I ride almost all the time always has the panniers on it, I carry more crap -- er, stuff -- than just about anyone here. I won't go into a complete list -- (a) because I don't have the time and (b) because I'll never hear the end of it -- but some of the stuff is a patch kit, spare tubes, pumps, tire gauge, multi-tools, flashlight, knife, lock, hat, gloves, helmet cover, tape, New Skin, super glue, spare reflective vest, and a brake cable. (Yes, I am fully aware that several of those words are plural.)

Oh, I do not have jumper cables -- yes, I have had someone ask me.


What do you recommend someone have at all times...and what's "nice to have"?

Everything you need to change a flat. (I usually prefer to simply replace the tube when I'm out, but a patch kit works, too.)

In this weather? Water, too. (I saw a number of cyclists out there this afternoon without water.)

DSalovesh
06-20-2012, 04:22 PM
On-bike pouches don't work out for me - several bikes, bad parking, forgetful... Everyday though, my backpack has a 3"x6"x1.5" case for bike stuff, to wit:


1 spare 700c tube (the "right" size for one bike, workable on two others)
2 tire levers
Self-gluing patches
CO2 adapter and 2 16g cartridges (wrapped in old tubes)
Multi-tool w/ chain breaker
spoke wrench
Rubber gloves
Small bottle of oil
Keys for the locking skewers on a couple of my bikes
"Trixie" 15mm wrench / bottle opener (wrapped in "Gorilla" tape)
Blackburn "Flea" light set
Miscellany including web straps, zip ties, bailing wire, cleat screws, chain links & quicklinks


Also in the backpack I often carry at least a tiny U-lock (like, 4" - just big enough to attach the bike to something when I dash into a store for a minute), a hand pump, and a more robust lighting setup if it isn't already on the bike. This is far more than I really need, and in fact I often go months without even opening this kit, but I like the peace of mind that comes from knowing whatever I need to finish this ride somehow is probably with me.

vvill
06-20-2012, 05:16 PM
I almost always have on me a spare tube, 2 levers and a pump. The pump isn't in the bag. My bikes all have at least one rear light permanently attached and I usually keep a very small front light (e.g. the BikeArlington ones) with me too just in case.
Generally I travel with my driver's licence, a credit card and my cell phone too, tho I will only put those in the under-seat bag if I'm on a recreational ride (as opposed to a commute).

If I'm going for a longer ride I'll add a multi-tool, patch kit and cash (usually in a zip-lock bag with my phone/cards). I should probably add a spare chain link but I've never used one before and only vaguely remember seeing a chain tool used once during a ride.

I usually try to have something that might work as a boot now as well (a dollar bill) since I blew out a tire not that long ago (americancyclo helped me out with a folded receipt as a boot).

KLizotte
06-20-2012, 05:43 PM
New road bike has a super tiny frame which means little real estate to attach anything. My under the saddle pack is small due to rack getting in the way; in it I carry:

Tube
Lever
Patch kit
CO2 cartridge & inflater

That takes up every molecule of space unfortunately.

In jersey pockets I usually carry phone, keys, driver's license, health insurance card, metro card, $10-$20 bill, kleenex, and mini pump. I've started carrying my business cards too since they can be used in case of an accident (as a witness or participant).

If I'm using panniers or my big basket on my commuter hybrid, I include multitool, disposable rubber gloves, bandaids, single serve Neosporin, baby wipes, and a disposable shower cap I got from a hotel (works great on the helmet when unexpected rain hits). This group of stuff I keep in a ziplock bag so I can move it from bike to bike easily.

off2ride
06-20-2012, 09:35 PM
I don't use the saddle bag but I do carry (on my beater steed)

Telescopic pump
Swiss Army Knife w/ the built in light (trick huh)
Spare Tube
Tire Levers
Flashlight (comes in handy when doing road side repairs in the winter months)
Spare Wind Vest

DaveK
06-20-2012, 09:55 PM
I love that this topic on the index page is immediately below "Commuter Shorts".

Bilsko
06-21-2012, 07:58 AM
I've been using the Sci-Con pouches for a few years now and am a fan. They have a nice attachment mechanism so no straps to mess with - it just locks in to the saddle with a quarter twist and stays secure.
Looks like this: 1232

Its one of their smaller pouches, so not a lot of room inside:
2 levers integrated into the bag itself (they have a version with a multitool integrated but I didn't go for that one)
1 Gorilla Multitool
1 tube
1 CO2
1 CO2-->Presta adapter
1 Basic patch kit
Looks like this:
1233

brendan
06-21-2012, 10:57 AM
Everything important has been covered, but I'll add:

1) It's wise to have both a tube and a patch kit, sometimes you end up needing both. And the tire boot too!
2) Double check that you got the right valve type on the tube in addition to the right wheel size and tire width...I biked about 8 months without realizing that my backup tube was a schraeder, not a presta...oops.
3) A micro-sized hiking headlamp, just in case my front light dies or breaks. It can get really dark out there...
4) Not in the bike kit per se, but: I keep a cotton bandanna tied to the handlebars, primarily to clean salt/sweat off of my sunglasses and, occasionally, my phone.

Brendan

5555624
06-21-2012, 11:06 AM
2) Double check that you got the right valve type on the tube in addition to the right wheel size and tire width...I biked about 8 months without realizing that my backup tube was a schraeder, not a presta...oops.

Well, you can always carry a pump that accomodates both or more than one pump....


3) A micro-sized hiking headlamp, just in case my front light dies or breaks. It can get really dark out there...

It's also handy when fixing a flat in the dark.

vvill
06-21-2012, 11:08 AM
Well, you can always carry a pump that accomodates both or more than one pump....

I think he meant you can't fit a schraeder tube into a presta drilled rim. Unless you carry a drill with you. :D

GuyContinental
06-21-2012, 12:16 PM
2) Double check that you got the right valve type on the tube in addition to the right wheel size and tire width...I biked about 8 months without realizing that my backup tube was a schraeder, not a presta...oops.


The other variation of this are 48mm vs 60mm presta stems- I was carrying 48s for a year after I bought a set of semi-deep dish wheels. When I eventually got a flat I was fortunate that a friend on the ride had a 60mm.

BTW this sort of thread is great! I was pretty content with my kit but due the best and brightest of BikeArlington I'll add (somehow):
-Zip ties
-Benadryl
-Presta adaptor
-Cleat screw

I'll still skip:
The boot (I've always made do with a Mylar wrapper of some kind- it'd be enough to limp to the nearest shop)
Med kit- there just isn't room for anything approximating a decent kit. If I'm badly hurt there is no way that I'll have enough, if it's just road rash, I'll bleed (I have excellent clotting skills)

chuckb
06-21-2012, 06:50 PM
Not much to add to this, except that I go minimalist: tube, 2 tire levers, 2 CO2 cartridges and that tiny Genuine Innovations CO2 inflator.

One thing not mentioned so far: I have a small pair of folding magnifying glasses to help out my eyes "of a certain age". Seriously, I can't do fine repair work at all without them.

Riley Casey
06-22-2012, 08:57 PM
So many good suggestions on 'should haves' and 'gotta haves', way more than I can contribute to. On the bike app front though I can recommend this wholeheartedly. Just be sure to open it after you download it as it downloads the images only after the app installs on your phone. Could be a nasty surprise when you find you need to download a few dozen high quality images on a low speed phone connection to fix that out of whack derailleur by the road side.

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/bike-repair/id382006079?mt=8




... You can also download a bike repair app but I am not sure how good they are.

brendan
06-23-2012, 12:07 AM
One thing not mentioned so far: I have a small pair of folding magnifying glasses to help out my eyes "of a certain age". Seriously, I can't do fine repair work at all without them.

Oh yeah, good point. I noticed my first problems with presbyopia last year...while working on the bike.

Brendan

streetsmarts
04-19-2018, 10:37 AM
Reviving this old thread. What a great thread!

Q1: What do you carry in your saddle bag (I don't do the jersey pouch) or pannier or backpack?
Me: Spare tube
Patch kit
Duct tape wrapped around pencil
Hand wipes
Pen (for marking where the puncture is on a flat tube)
Spare rear & front lights
Phone charger, cable
Medical type gloves for dealing with dirty chains

Q2 re pumps: I have not used a C02 Canister, and am not a fan because a. haven't tried to use it yet (!) and b. they're disposable. Still, i have one because a non-biker friend gave me one!!

Also, I have not fixed a flat on the road. I'm a noob still!

So talk to me about fixing flats on the road and what pump is best and not over $50!

I have a Lezyne Pressure Drive. Now part of it is missing. I see there are replacement seal kits. I think there are rubber seals/gaskets on 2 ends. I have one on one end, but not on the other. Why would they make something where the thing falls off when jumbled around in a bag! Maybe I should've mounted to the frame.

I know this sounds very basic, but hey, I'm still learning!

And yes, I will try to use both of my pumps soon, but most of my trips are local in DC and so I can catch a bus or metro if i get a flat!! and fortunately, after fixing several flats for others at Bike House, I do know how to patch or replace a tube!

hozn
04-19-2018, 11:42 AM
This is always a good read. I like the idea of zip ties from above (I'd consider that on the MTB, anyway).

I am always trying to keep these as small as possible.

Road bike.
In the saddle bag (Lezyne Micro Caddy, Small - http://www.lezyne.com/product-orgnzrs-caddys-mcrocaddysm.php#.WtjBwtPwbUI):
- 1 tube
- 1 Pedros tire lever (https://pedros.com/products/tools/wheel-and-tire/tire-levers/), since one is all you need.
- 1 CO2+inflator
- 1 11sp quick link
- multi-tool with chain tool (https://www.crankbrothers.com/products/m19 - the only decent thing Crank Bros makes, IMO!)
- tubeless repair plugs (https://www.genuineinnovations.com/au/products/tools-accessories/tubeless-repair-kit.php)
- Park adhesive patches, just in case things get crazy.
- Maybe 1 nitrile glove; I can't remember if I still have that in there.

In jersey pocket: pump. I'm using this one https://www.amazon.com/dp/B019V1PW5G/ref=twister_B01MQ4R3DT?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1 -- It looks a lot like a Lezyne mini pump, and while I don't like it when companies just copy the aesthetics of some other brand's well-known product, my experience has been that these are better-made pumps than the Lezynes. Finish is certainly a lot nicer/higher-quality, functionality works great, and at half the price I'm a lot less sad when I lose one out of my pocket on a ride in the woods.

Commuter/gravel bike.
In the saddle bag (Silca Premio seat roll -- fancy! -- https://silca.cc/products/57c424fc56d9341100298881)
- 1 tube (bigger, for bigger tires)
- the other Pedros tire lever from the set.
- same Crank Bros tool as above
- same tubeless plug kit as above
- 1 nitrile glove
- Park adhesive patches again

In jersey pocket: my pump.

I just sold my MTB [with the seat roll]; I'm not sure what I'm gonna do for my replacement MTB that arrives Monday, but I think I'm going to see if I can avoid the saddle bag -- maybe using one of these: https://www.76projects.com/shop/thepiggy -- but they're a bit pricey w/ current exchange rate (even at the current 20% off discount).

streetsmarts
04-19-2018, 11:50 AM
Hozn, thanks! that was great and comprehensive.

Now that I can change a chain and use a chain tool and quick link (Thanks Judd Lumberjack and friends at The Bike House Coop for walking me through changing Judd's recently) - I might carry those.
I did have a chain break mid-ride (I think it was during the Cider Ride) - and had to go to a shop.
Now I know - not that hard!

huskerdont
04-19-2018, 12:06 PM
Fun!

In the saddle bag or water bottle (great alternative to a saddle bag I've started using), for road riding I carry just a tube, patch kit, Soma steel-core tire lever, multi-tool, and chain tool. Pump usually gets shoved inside the back of the shorts or in a jersey pocket. For mountain biking, I'd add a spare derailleur hanger.

In the commuter bag I have added thin gloves for changing flats in cold weather, CO2 canister + tool, alcohol wipes, and gauze. Learned to carry gauze the hard way when I wouldn't stop bleeding all over my work clothes once when I got to work. Oh, and a 15-mm wrench for removing the wheel of the single speed for those times I still use it.

Need to add duct tape. Carry it in my kayaks and have not keep forgetting to move that over to biking.

Emm
04-19-2018, 01:11 PM
Commuter Bike. All in my purple Po Campo bag, usually within a bike-themed zipper pouch my friend made me to keep things organized:

Spare tube
Patch kit
C02 cartridge (1x half used, one new one)
2x tire levers
latex gloves
advil
Alien II bike tool
wrench to get my wheels off when I ride the flat bar commuter, I remove this when I ride the road bike commuter
spare hand/toe warmers during the winter



Weekend Road Bike (saddle bag & front handlebar bag added on long rides)

Spare tube
Patch kit
C02 cartridge
2x tire levers
latex gloves
advil
Alien II bike tool
2x tampons
House/car keys
Couple brightly colored zip ties
quick link
A little bit of cash, & my credit cards, ID and metro card


Jersey pockets:

sunscreen
absurd number of cereal bars and bananas

musclys
04-19-2018, 02:08 PM
Jersey pockets:

sunscreen
absurd number of cereal bars and bananas


I thought bananas go in your bib shorts pocket.

Steve O
04-19-2018, 02:17 PM
My saddle bag has in it (I think)


2 tire levers
tube
patch kit (patches, glue and a couple glueless patches in case the glue has dried out)
multi tool/chain tool
spoke wrench (although I think I noticed that my multi tool has this built in, so I might have removed it for redundancy reasons)
latex gloves
first aid items: bandaids and mini-wipes I think (I haven't checked this for a while, but I know something is in there)
zip ties


I like the Advil idea; will likely add to the first aid items.

Re: zip ties - Emm and I were riding last Saturday, and we salvaged someone's ride with her zip tie. The rider's rear basket rack mount had broken. It took a couple minutes and a committee of all three of us, but we eventually determined that the zip tie was just long enough to secure the basket so the rider could go on her way.

I actually don't carry anything at all on my vintage 3-speed toodler bike. I'm usually just in the neighborhood when I ride it, so in a worst case I could walk it home I guess.

bentbike33
04-19-2018, 02:26 PM
I thought bananas go in your bib shorts pocket.

Is that a banana in your pocket, or...ah, nevermind.

streetsmarts
04-19-2018, 02:34 PM
What pump? If I may ask?

Yes, I heard somewhere about duct tape (maybe from camping/hiking) - and instead of carrying a whole roll, use a stick/pencil etc. and wrap some around it for use for whatever.

Also per Erin & Steve's posts below - Zip ties - great idea!

LhasaCM
04-19-2018, 03:25 PM
Let's see, I generally have (or at least think I have) in a pannier:

Spare tube (or two) for my bike, plus one for the trailercycle.
Small multi-tool set
First aid kit (mostly so I have disinfectant/wipes/bandaids for the occasional "daughter was swinging on the bike racks while I was locking up and took a fall" need)
Pump (Lezyne Gauge Drive HP, I believe)
After last year's Purple Line ride with Bobco, I got a small Schrader/Presta adapter to be able to use the random gas station/rec center air pumps out there.
Patch kit or two (from random giveaways)
Combination tire lever/15mm wrench (3wrencho from PDW) plus a few spare tire levers
Rain poncho/jacket of some sort
Spare socks
Chain (connects to the frame lock - for locking the bike up to an object as opposed to making someone carry it away)
A few zip ties (which reminds me, I need to toss more in)


This time of year, I tend to also have spare/different weight gloves or a hat, in case I chose poorly when I set off.

n18
04-19-2018, 03:27 PM
Look for a pump that would fit inside a water bottle, and 120+ PSI.

Also, don't buy a multi-tool without a chain tool, since you need the latter sooner or later. Here are some options with decent reviews/quality: $19 (https://www.amazon.com/Vibrelli-Bike-Multi-Tool-V19/dp/B06XGWMGB9/), $13 (https://www.amazon.com/Star-Bicycle-Repair-Function-Hexagon/dp/B072NBYBXS/).

Kleenex or gloves is probably the most forgotten item when packing flat repair stuff.

LhasaCM
04-19-2018, 08:08 PM
Let's see, I generally have (or at least think I have) in a pannier:

Spare tube (or two) for my bike, plus one for the trailercycle.
Small multi-tool set
First aid kit (mostly so I have disinfectant/wipes/bandaids for the occasional "daughter was swinging on the bike racks while I was locking up and took a fall" need)
Pump (Lezyne Gauge Drive HP, I believe)
After last year's Purple Line ride with Bobco, I got a small Schrader/Presta adapter to be able to use the random gas station/rec center air pumps out there.
Patch kit or two (from random giveaways)
Combination tire lever/15mm wrench (3wrencho from PDW) plus a few spare tire levers
Rain poncho/jacket of some sort
Spare socks
Chain (connects to the frame lock - for locking the bike up to an object as opposed to making someone carry it away)
A few zip ties (which reminds me, I need to toss more in)


This time of year, I tend to also have spare/different weight gloves or a hat, in case I chose poorly when I set off.

Oh - and completely forgot about the newest addition to the pannier until I got out to use it this afternoon: I also carry with me a small broom and dustpan. :)

hozn
04-20-2018, 08:17 AM
Look for a pump that would fit inside a water bottle, and 120+ PSI.

That's a lot of pressure in 2018! Are you running 18mm tubulars!? :-)


Also, don't buy a multi-tool without a chain tool, since you need the latter sooner or later. Here are some options with decent reviews/quality: $19 (https://www.amazon.com/Vibrelli-Bike-Multi-Tool-V19/dp/B06XGWMGB9/), $13 (https://www.amazon.com/Star-Bicycle-Repair-Function-Hexagon/dp/B072NBYBXS/).

The genuine article (Crank Bros) only costs $5 more. I'd suggest it's likely worth it in this case, my knockoff pump experience notwithstanding.

https://www.amazon.com/Crank-Brothers-Multi-Bicycle-19-Function/dp/B00067W7CG/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1524230121&sr=1-2&keywords=crank%2Bbrother%2Bm19&th=1

huskerdont
04-20-2018, 08:30 AM
What pump? If I may ask?

Yes, I heard somewhere about duct tape (maybe from camping/hiking) - and instead of carrying a whole roll, use a stick/pencil etc. and wrap some around it for use for whatever.

Also per Erin & Steve's posts below - Zip ties - great idea!

Mine is a Crank Bros Sterling LG. Has a nice gauge on it that goes to 100 psi, and is the only mini pump I've had where I can attain road-bike-tire pressures.

streetsmarts
04-20-2018, 09:38 AM
Wow, I just checked out that multi-tool. That's amazing!!
and a Torx driver for disc brakes!!
HA. I have disc brakes. I can ...ummm... sorta adjust them. but someday maybe I'll know what that's for (adjusting calipers? just using a word I know is part of the disc brake system!! :))
Chain tool included is cool. thanks!!

hozn
04-20-2018, 09:49 AM
Wow, I just checked out that multi-tool. That's amazing!!
and a Torx driver for disc brakes!!
HA. I have disc brakes. I can ...ummm... sorta adjust them. but someday maybe I'll know what that's for (adjusting calipers? just using a word I know is part of the disc brake system!! :))
Chain tool included is cool. thanks!!

Yeah, I have never heard of anyone needing to adjust their rotor bolts, which is the classic application of the T25 torx. So I used to think that was a waste of space on a tool, but some bikes/groups also use the T25 for the bolts (esp. titanium bolts) that hold that caliper to the fork/frame. I could see needing to adjust those (e.g. caliper was rubbing rotor).

mstone
04-20-2018, 11:36 AM
That's a lot of pressure in 2018! Are you running 18mm tubulars!? :-)



The genuine article (Crank Bros) only costs $5 more. I'd suggest it's likely worth it in this case, my knockoff pump experience notwithstanding.

https://www.amazon.com/Crank-Brothers-Multi-Bicycle-19-Function/dp/B00067W7CG/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1524230121&sr=1-2&keywords=crank%2Bbrother%2Bm19&th=1

+1 on the crank brothers tool.

For a pump I like the topeak morph series. I want a gauge because I suck at guessing the pressure, I want a hose because I've managed to rip the valve off a tire with an old school stick pump (that's a hard thing to patch), and I want something that I push against the ground because that's a much more practical way to generate pressure than doing butterfly curls. I don't really care how big it is since it goes in a bag. (Full disclosure: I do also have a co2 filler for times when I don't have a big bag.)

Emm
04-20-2018, 11:56 AM
+1 on the crank brothers tool.


So I was just in the market for a new multi-tool after somehow losing half of mine (...it got lost in a box somewhere when I moved a few months ago). I ended up with the Alien II tool even though the crank bros one was cheaper, lighter, smaller, and came in pink. The crank bros tool lacked a knife, which oddly enough is a tool I've actually used alot of in my multi-tool. From cutting zip ties or their ends, de-tangling random crap that's gotten caught in parts of my bike, and other random stuff that's occurred while I'm out for a ride, it's been a useful thing to have. I'm sure I could just pack a tiny pocket knife too and save on weight and bulk, but then that's just one more thing for me to forget.

mstone
04-20-2018, 12:09 PM
So I was just in the market for a new multi-tool after somehow losing half of mine (...it got lost in a box somewhere when I moved a few months ago). I ended up with the Alien II tool even though the crank bros one was cheaper, lighter, smaller, and came in pink. The crank bros tool lacked a knife, which oddly enough is a tool I've actually used alot of in my multi-tool. From cutting zip ties or their ends, de-tangling random crap that's gotten caught in parts of my bike, and other random stuff that's occurred while I'm out for a ride, it's been a useful thing to have. I'm sure I could just pack a tiny pocket knife too and save on weight and bulk, but then that's just one more thing for me to forget.

I usually have a mini multitool with blade and pliers with me, whether on a bike or not.

hozn
04-20-2018, 12:54 PM
Good point, re: knife. I have considered getting one of these for keeping in the saddle bag: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000PW56QG
(I'm sure there are cheaper options, but I was given one of these and it has lasted for years without dulling)

ginacico
04-24-2018, 01:19 PM
Wow, I just checked out that multi-tool. That's amazing!!
and a Torx driver for disc brakes!!

Yup. Next time you do a bike fix-it night, have someone show you the process to adjust your disk brakes. You probably have two adjusters for the inside & outside calipers (my brakes are Avid BB7s, YMMV). In general, the trick is to get them as close as possible to the disk, so the brakes have some grab, without rubbing (cuz that sucks). You may also have a barrel adjuster on the cable near the brake lever, to tweak the tension.

I have the Crank Bros multitool with a Torx driver etc. My problem is the drivers are really short, and it's too dang awkward to get the thing inside the spokes to adjust the inside caliper. I got a Torx wrench with a long driver that I use at home for bike tuning. And if I have to adjust on the road, I just fumble around attempting to spin the adjusters with my thumbs.

This thread has been awesome as I'm prepping for a 2-week bike trip, hoping to upgrade a few of my tools in the kit!

Judd
04-24-2018, 04:35 PM
Wow, I just checked out that multi-tool. That's amazing!!
and a Torx driver for disc brakes!!
HA. I have disc brakes. I can ...ummm... sorta adjust them. but someday maybe I'll know what that's for (adjusting calipers? just using a word I know is part of the disc brake system!! :))
Chain tool included is cool. thanks!!

I need to replace the pads on my mechanical disc brakes. Iíll provide the instruction if you want to do the wrenching on my bike. Itís fairly easy. I learned how to change pads and adjust the pads as they wear by watching a few videos on YouTube.

streetsmarts
04-24-2018, 06:55 PM
I need to replace the pads on my mechanical disc brakes. Iíll provide the instruction if you want to do the wrenching on my bike. Itís fairly easy. I learned how to change pads and adjust the pads as they wear by watching a few videos on YouTube.Yes. I'd love to. We will schedule offline!

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

streetsmarts
04-24-2018, 06:58 PM
Yup. Next time you do a bike fix-it night, have someone show you the process to adjust your disk brakes. You probably have two adjusters for the inside & outside calipers (my brakes are Avid BB7s, YMMV). In general, the trick is to get them as close as possible to the disk, so the brakes have some grab, without rubbing (cuz that sucks). You may also have a barrel adjuster on the cable near the brake lever, to tweak the tension.

I have the Crank Bros multitool with a Torx driver etc. My problem is the drivers are really short, and it's too dang awkward to get the thing inside the spokes to adjust the inside caliper. I got a Torx wrench with a long driver that I use at home for bike tuning. And if I have to adjust on the road, I just fumble around attempting to spin the adjusters with my thumbs.

This thread has been awesome as I'm prepping for a 2-week bike trip, hoping to upgrade a few of my tools in the kit!Thanks ! I have adjusted my disc brakes (mech.) I know how to adjust the barrel adjuster but they're really hard to get to. And the in and out ...yep I've tried to do those but had a bike shop fix em for me. More time...more patience. I'm learning.

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

n18
04-24-2018, 07:41 PM
Here is the tool I use (https://www.amazon.com/Serfas-Slimline-Mini-Tool-Chrome/dp/B001XUOJH6/). I was lucky enough to have paid only $8 for it when a bike shop closed(Hudson).

Features:


11 Function tool
Chaintool, spoke wrench, phillips, flathead, T25 Torx, 2, 2.5, 3,4,5,6mm allen key
Dimensions: 75x44x10 mm, 3"x1.75"x0.4"