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PotomacCyclist
02-22-2012, 06:15 AM
Any recommendations for warm-weather bike sandals for use with Shimano mountain bike pedals? I've looked up a couple online but the reviews seemed to be mixed. I don't want to wear a hot and stuffy mountain bike shoe in the spring and summer. I tend to stay on paved roads and paths on the mountain bike so I don't care too much about extreme off-road performance with the sandals.

Dirt
02-22-2012, 08:00 AM
Keen are the only ones that I've used that I actually like. They've got a bit of toe protection, which is important on a bicycle.

http://www.keenfootwear.com/us/en/product/fw11/shoes/men/pedal/commuter

They are really comfy as shoes too. They're quite durable and well worth the price.

Dirt
02-22-2012, 08:06 AM
I'm totally bummed that they don't make THESE (http://www.keenfootwear.com/us/en/product/fw11/shoes/men/industrial/dallas%20wellington/dark%20brown#) with an SPD compatible sole. I'd love a set of steel-toed work boots that I could use on my bike.

Please see my previous post for a sensible answer to your question. :D

Pete

DSalovesh
02-22-2012, 10:26 AM
I used to be really happy with my Shimano SD60 sandals. It felt strange at first to ride with my toes exposed, but the sole shape did a pretty good job of keeping my toes safe. I wore them all summer and well into the fall (& sometimes winter even, with funky bright fleece socks). Over time I wore the soles off one pair and the straps tore out of another, but I got 4-5 years of use out of each.

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=7993

Sadly, this model was discontinued several years ago, though there is some NOS still available in limited sizes - not mine though.

There are two replacement models, the SD65 and the SD66. The SD65 adds a third strap and (if i remember right) a neoprene liner. This probably was meant to improve comfort and extend the useful season for people who can't bear the thought of socks with sandals, but it also negates the free and open feeling of the previous model. It is more like a shoe with cut-outs.

http://www.chainreactioncycles.com/Models.aspx?ModelID=9493

I've looked at the SD-66, but only briefly. I think it retained the neoprene liner but went back to two straps. I might have bought them but I've only seen them in a brown color I don't like much. (There are online pictures of them in blue so maybe some day I'll try again. My first SD60 sandals fit very differently from other cycling shoes and cost so much to return that I didn't bother, so I'm in no hurry to mail order this time.)

http://harriscyclery.net/product/shimano-sh-sd66-spd-sandals-1218.htm

The original version of the Keen SPD sandals were horrible. I don't really have wide feet, and I can usually get along with "standard" width in most shoes. When I tried the Keens on my foot was way too wide for the sole - hanging off on both sides and bulging at the straps. When I went up a size to get a larger footbed the rest of the sandal was way too loose and the sole was still on the narrow side. They improved that a bit from the second year on, and that's what I wear now in the summer, but even the revised model is super-narrow for my tastes.

I think Lake used to make an SPD-ready sandal (I know they did, not sure if they still do), but when I tried it side-by-side with my first Shimanos the Lake seemed a little too open for my comfort. I believe now that may have been just my untested unease about giving up closed shoes. I can't find them for sale now so it's probably all beside the point.

Somewhere along the way I picked up a pair of Bontrager MTB shoes that are almost completely mesh in the uppers - so much so that when I wear bright socks I can see them through the shoes. They work very well in summer too, for those rides when I actually do want a full shoe but I don't want to pickle my feet from heat and sweat. They're not quite as good as sandals for getting caught in a soaking rain, but the ventilation is more than adequate to dry them quickly.

paulg
02-22-2012, 11:59 AM
I loved my old Shimano sandals. It's a great feeling to be riding around in the summer without the need to wear socks but still be clipped in.

It loos like the SD-66 is the closest to this older design with the 2 straps. I agree with DSalovesh that the 3 strap ones kind of miss the point of wearing sandals as they cover up your feet too much.

The shimano ones I had were stiffened quite nicely which reduced a hot spot at the cleat but they were easy to walk in.

Price point made a sandal for a while but I don't see it on their site any more. Nashbar has an own brand

http://www.nashbar.com/bikes/Product_10053_10052_169948_-1___

It looks very similar in construction to my price point ones but it has an enclosed toe.

Heres looking forward to the warm weather! Although I can't complain too much about this winter though can we!)

Good luck.

PotomacCyclist
02-22-2012, 08:56 PM
Thanks for the replies. I've seen the Keen and Shimano models online. Both have mixed reviews so I wanted to see what people here thought about them. I'll try to look for them in a local store since bike shoe sizing seems to be all over the place.

I also need to get new insoles for my regular MTB shoes. I didn't think there was a problem with my current insoles (which came with the Shimano shoes), but they have a weird upturn on the lateral edge (left side on the left foot, etc.), sort of like arch support only there is no arch on the lateral side of the foot. I had never noticed it before, but after doing a long ride this week (4 hrs.), I found that the upturned insole digs into the side of the foot after a couple hours on the bike. I don't think I can do another long ride with those insoles.

It's not a preexisting injury. After a day, the side of the foot feels fine. The other foot never hurt at all, and nothing else hurt (except for some minor wrist soreness late in the ride). I've never experienced that discomfort while running. So I'm pretty sure it's the insoles. I need to get something flatter. If I can't find any MTB-specific flat insoles, then I'll go with generic flat insoles at Rite Aid.