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QuantFail
02-14-2012, 09:20 AM
Hello,

Me again. This forum has been really helpful on providing well thought out advice, so thank you. I am still uncertain on my new bike, and I don't want to rush it. Since I'll be keeping my pedals/shoes for a very long time (bike to bike), I decided to purchase them first while I continue to research various bikes. Shoes I can see that the factor to consider would be comfort. However, what about pedals? Is there anything higher end pedals provide besides the brand name? Anything proprietary out there? Thanks.

bluerider
02-14-2012, 12:06 PM
I am a huge fan of Crank Brother's Egg Beaters. The make abour 4 different levels based on bearing vs bushing and materials (ie weight). Just buy what you can afford. I just bought a new set of Egg Beater 3s and love them.

KS1G
02-14-2012, 12:51 PM
I prefer SPD for commuting (easier to walk in shoes, pedals clip in both sides); Eggbeaters would work well, too. I discovered a few years ago that Shimano SPD and the Performance/Forte brand SPD-equivalent are almost cross-compatible. I forget which combination of cleats and pedals worked in both, however :mad:

creadinger
02-14-2012, 12:57 PM
I second the SPDs. They're the only pedals I've ever used though, so I can't compare them to others. They're really good for walking around off the bike because the cleat is usually recessed. You won't see SPDs in a pro road race, but they're functional and are pretty durable.

I was interested in trying out the Speedplay Frogs at one point, but I never got around to buying anything.

dasgeh
02-14-2012, 01:10 PM
I used Deltas for a while. I used SPDs for a few months. Now I have Eggbeaters, which are very similar to, but somehow different than, SPDs.

Deltas were great for racing -- better stability, easier to position in EXACTLY the right way, harder to clip out of.

SPDs and eggbeaters are better for commuting -- set it up once and they don't move, the clips fit into the sole of the shoe, so you can walk on normal ground without issues, easy to clip out.

I believe SPDs/eggbeaters are cheaper.

Tim Kelley
02-14-2012, 01:37 PM
I like Look Keo pedals!

jabberwocky
02-14-2012, 01:48 PM
I run Time MTB pedals on all my bikes (aside from the downhill and dirt jumpers, which run flats). I've previously run Shimano SPDs; I prefer Times, but the Shimanos are ok too. Pedals are kinda personal. Everyone has their preferences. The truth is that they are all good, it just depends on what you want.

elcee
02-14-2012, 03:14 PM
A good LBS can really help out here. You could try different makes on a bike trainer, which is much safer than being on the open road.

I myself like SPDs, because I like to walk during my bike rides. All my bikes, whether road or trail, have SPDs, which makes it easy to get on any bike. There are 2 kinds of SPD cleats, one that releases in multiple directions, and another that only releases laterally. The release tension is quite adjustable, and there's enough float for me. Cons: (1) some people have complained about hot spots because it's a small cleat, though I never experienced it and (2) bike snobs poo-poo such things on a road bike.

From 2nd-hand experience:

Speedplays - Pros: very low profile, and double sided. Cons: float has very little friction, so it feels like you're on ice while pedaling?

SPD-SL - Pros: the choice of the roadie, and very popular (so you can ride your buddy's bike). Cons: slippery, bulky, cleat wears down if you walk on it too much.

off2ride
02-14-2012, 07:00 PM
Your pedal purchase should be determined by your weight, riding style and the terrain that you ride in day in and day out. When I used to race, I chose the Speedplay X pedals because it gave me a flawless start (meaning that I didn't have to look down to engage my cleats to the pedals because it was double sided) nice cornering clearance in crits and lightweight. That was in 1993 I believe. To this day I still use those pedals. I'm 142 lbs so the spindle is thick enough for my weight. The fatter the spindle, the heavier the rider it can accommodate. So make sure it can take your weight first then go for the other features. Buena suerte.

DCAKen
02-15-2012, 10:00 AM
I have ridden with SPDs for over a decade, but decided to give Egg Beaters when they came installed on my new commuter bike. I was quickly sold on the new pedals...they didn't leave me with the same numb spot that I had gotten used to with the SPDs.

QuantFail
02-16-2012, 06:58 PM
I bought the Shimana SPD SL pedals and Shimano SH R300 shoes. I checked out the eggbeater and the manager told me that the beaters don't have as much surface space as the SPD, so it's less force, and thus slower...etc. Gave me a bunch of other factoids, most of it went over my head, so I just trusted his experience.

Picking up my bike tomorrow afternoon in Arlington, taking off from work a few hours early, and should be ready to ride! Pretty excited about putting on all my stuff and riding.

By the way, does anyone know where I can find some tights (pants not shorts) with butt padding? I could only find shorts, and I feel kind of uncomfortable riding around in speedo shorts. I don't want to wear baggy pants, so I am going to opt out for tights, but all the pants don't have butt pads.

off2ride
02-16-2012, 07:23 PM
Pretty common item that local bike shops keep on hand. Look for tights that have a lot of panels (stitched sections) and a thick cushy chamois. The more the panels, the more durable and comfortable it is.

KLizotte
02-16-2012, 07:26 PM
REI is a good source for cycling clothes. If you want tights, best start looking quick since stores will be cleaning out their inventory in preparation for summer clothes.

vvill
02-16-2012, 10:38 PM
I've only ever used SPDs and Crank Bros before. Both are fine but I prefer Crank Bros for the 4-sided entry which lets me clip in very fast. I have Crank Bros Candy pedals on 3 bikes.

bluerider
02-17-2012, 06:40 AM
I don't know that I buy the LBS manager surface area agreement. Sounds like voodoo to me but enjoy your SPD purchase. I'll stick with my less powerful pedals. Let us know how things go.

jtcallahan
02-17-2012, 11:01 AM
I can't debate the performance benefits of having more contact area, but having more surface is sure a confidence booster if you are on your pedals unclipped.


I don't know that I buy the LBS manager surface area agreement. Sounds like voodoo to me but enjoy your SPD purchase. I'll stick with my less powerful pedals. Let us know how things go.

thecyclingeconomist
02-18-2012, 11:31 PM
Contact surface area shouldn't have anything to do with power transfer... that has much more to do with how much play your foot has in your shoe, how flexible the sole is, and whether there is play in the cleat-pedal interface.

I'm surprised that no-one mentioned the amount of float (free-side-to-side-movement) that the different pedals offer. I have a bad knee, and can't run SPDs ever. They only have 7 degrees of float, and tend to feel like they lock-into a single position. I run egg-beaters on my commuter, and speedplays on my road bikes. (I have run time, look, shimano-both spd and spd-sl, frogs, and these are just the most comfortable for me.)

You can also check out bebops. The seem to be a pretty cool pedal system.

Insofar as shorts: the chamois is critical. Don't spend less than $65MSRP, as the lower quality chamois usually break down quickly, and or they don't have as many panels and thus don't fit as well. Make sure also that the shorts have some sort of material to keep them in place at the thigh (most good shorts have a silicon band at the bottom to keep them from riding up on your leg.)

Good luck and god bless!

TCE (Thecyclingeconomist)

vvill
02-19-2012, 10:07 AM
Agree about the float, I totally forgot about that - I have bad knees too. Also agree that the surface area shouldn't really impact your power transfer all that much.

QuantFail
02-20-2012, 09:20 AM
I guess the best thing is to try out the various pedals. I bought SPDs, and since these are my first pedals, I of course feel uncomfortable. I can't be sure if this comfort level is what is to expect from road pedals, or if it is actually the pedal itself. I can only find that out by now trying out the egg-beaters. So on to trial and error.

This past weekend I went to Seneca Regional Park to ride, in my sweatpants, I will never do that again. For one, the legs of my pants were getting caught in the chain. They turned black from the grease. As if that wasn't dangerous enough, when I would try to get off my bike at stop signs or just to practice to clip on and off, my crotch would get caught on the sea, and a few times I came very close to a face-plant. Which made me go immediately to purchase my Pearl Izumi tights from performance, they had a clearance sale, and there was one Medium left; $104.99. My Jcrew pants aren't even that expensive (minus the suit pants). Hope they are worth it.

The other thing I learned from my ride and some youtube videos, is that the left and right shifters, shift different gears, and I don't want to be on opposite ends on both shifters. I was creating this horrible noise when shifting, and after watching the youtube video I realized I was shifting wrong. A few people were staring at me :(

I am still slightly scared of going out to the open road, because most of the times I can't clip in. Some times the pedals is inverted, but that really isn't the problem. I just can't place my cleat on the pedal at the correct position. I think that will correct itself with experience, and just having a feel for where the clip on the pedal is. Once I get that down I'll attempt a road. Until then I'll keep riding in the parks.

I have a lot more to learn, but determined to conquer this cycling thing! Thanks for all the good advice.

jabberwocky
02-20-2012, 10:59 AM
Insofar as shorts: the chamois is critical. Don't spend less than $65MSRP, as the lower quality chamois usually break down quickly, and or they don't have as many panels and thus don't fit as well. Make sure also that the shorts have some sort of material to keep them in place at the thigh (most good shorts have a silicon band at the bottom to keep them from riding up on your leg.)I disagree that expensive shorts are somehow necessary, at least for the majority of recreational cyclists. Obviously everyone is different, but I have a few pairs of cheap nashbar shorts that were like 15 bucks each, and they've held up fine for several years, and I've ridden them on many long rides and been happy with them.

Any bike shorts are worlds better than riding in cotton underwear.

KLizotte
02-20-2012, 12:03 PM
You are trying to learn everything at once QuantFail! That's very difficult to say the least.

You should consider having the LBS install a pair of flat pedals to give you a chance to get fully used to riding the bike first, learn how to shift properly, get used to how it behaves over different surfaces, etc. It will give you a chance to go on some long rides and get your muscles used to the bike too (you may find that you have to try out different saddles and make some minor adjustments to your bike's setup - you want the bike to fit like a glove). You really want to be comfortable on the bike before you attempt clipless pedals. This period will also give you a chance to get your cycling wardrobe put together. (Yeah, the tights are expensive but if they fit properly they should last at least a decade of heavy use - they are also probably made with windproof material which you will find invaluable. P.S. a good windbreaker is invaluable too). It will also give you a chance to get comfortable riding in traffic, on the multi-use trails, on hills, etc.

Once you feel comfortable on the bike, I would then have straps or toe cages put on the pedals. This will allow you to get used to the feeling of your feet being attached to the pedals but are far easier to get in/out of. You will inevitably have to make some emergency stops while riding around town and these will help you get used to not panicking while attached to the pedals. PowerGrips (http://www.mountainracingproducts.com/power-grips/) are good for learning the sideways movement required to disengage clipless since they require the same movement to get out of the straps. They also have the advantage that one side of the pedal can be used as an ordinary flat pedal.

Then when you feel completely comfortable with the straps and/or cages and are desiring more of a connection to the bike, then I'd switch to the clipless set up. By then your feet will be more coordinated, you'll feel weird *not* having your feet connected to the pedals, managing the bike will be second nature, your muscles will have built up to handle long rides, you'll have worked out any bike setting kinks (e.g., stem height), etc. This way you'll only have to concentrate on learning the clipless system and not anything else. There will be a trial and error adjustment period getting the tension right on the clipping in mechanism.

So all in all, my advice is to break the process down into component parts and think of them as a step-by-step process. We don't want you to fall and break anything! Also, with the warmer weather coming up you'll probably want to join some group rides and you really need to be able to handle your bike well to ride them safely. Depending on how much time you get in the saddle during this process, I'd say it could all be done in six months or so.

Good luck!

bluerider
02-21-2012, 07:37 AM
You are trying to learn everything at once QuantFail! That's very difficult to say the least.

You should consider having the LBS install a pair of flat pedals to give you a chance to get fully used to riding the bike first, learn how to shift properly, get used to how it behaves over different surfaces, etc. It will give you a chance to go on some long rides and get your muscles used to the bike too (you may find that you have to try out different saddles and make some minor adjustments to your bike's setup - you want the bike to fit like a glove). You really want to be comfortable on the bike before you attempt clipless pedals. This period will also give you a chance to get your cycling wardrobe put together. (Yeah, the tights are expensive but if they fit properly they should last at least a decade of heavy use - they are also probably made with windproof material which you will find invaluable. P.S. a good windbreaker is invaluable too). It will also give you a chance to get comfortable riding in traffic, on the multi-use trails, on hills, etc.

Once you feel comfortable on the bike, I would then have straps or toe cages put on the pedals. This will allow you to get used to the feeling of your feet being attached to the pedals but are far easier to get in/out of. You will inevitably have to make some emergency stops while riding around town and these will help you get used to not panicking while attached to the pedals. PowerGrips (http://www.mountainracingproducts.com/power-grips/) are good for learning the sideways movement required to disengage clipless since they require the same movement to get out of the straps. They also have the advantage that one side of the pedal can be used as an ordinary flat pedal.

Then when you feel completely comfortable with the straps and/or cages and are desiring more of a connection to the bike, then I'd switch to the clipless set up. By then your feet will be more coordinated, you'll feel weird *not* having your feet connected to the pedals, managing the bike will be second nature, your muscles will have built up to handle long rides, you'll have worked out any bike setting kinks (e.g., stem height), etc. This way you'll only have to concentrate on learning the clipless system and not anything else. There will be a trial and error adjustment period getting the tension right on the clipping in mechanism.

So all in all, my advice is to break the process down into component parts and think of them as a step-by-step process. We don't want you to fall and break anything! Also, with the warmer weather coming up you'll probably want to join some group rides and you really need to be able to handle your bike well to ride them safely. Depending on how much time you get in the saddle during this process, I'd say it could all be done in six months or so.

Good luck!

I have to agree with everything here. It just takes a little time to get accustomed to everything. Starting with flat pedals is cheap and reasonable.

americancyclo
02-21-2012, 10:26 AM
Once you feel comfortable on the bike, I would then have straps or toe cages put on the pedals. This will allow you to get used to the feeling of your feet being attached to the pedals but are far easier to get in/out of.
I'd argue against toe cages or straps. I've found that running shoes with pedals and properly tightened toe cages are much harder to release from cleanly than any clipless solution I've used. There is a consistency of release with a clipless system that you can't get with toe cages. If you can get easily out of toe cages, they're not tight enough to be doing you any good on pedal stroke or getting used to being connected to the bike.

Everything else, I agree with, and you can always get the Shimano M324 (http://goo.gl/Ybxj9) pedal that is flat on one side and has an SPD clip on the other.

mstone
02-21-2012, 02:04 PM
also the shimano a530

thecyclingeconomist
02-21-2012, 06:04 PM
I disagree that expensive shorts are somehow necessary, at least for the majority of recreational cyclists. Obviously everyone is different, but I have a few pairs of cheap nashbar shorts that were like 15 bucks each, and they've held up fine for several years, and I've ridden them on many long rides and been happy with them.

Any bike shorts are worlds better than riding in cotton underwear.

I guess it depends on definition of "recreational cyclist"... I ride about 5K per year, and am definitely just a recreational cyclist. I also do agree that ANY padded cycling short is better than cotton undies. However, when you ride 40 to 60 miles on a regular basis, the difference between a cheap entry level short/chamois and a "good one" becomes light-years away from each-other...

That being said: good sales at REI, Performancebike, and nashbar (as well as sites like bonktown.com and realcyclist.com) can save you hundreds of dollars! I just make sure I've tried on the stuff before buying online... as sizes/fit are SO different from manufacturer to manufacturer.

Also, how you wash/dry them makes a huge difference as to the longevity of the chamois.

I love my pearl izumo P.R.O. stuff, and can say that the bibs I bought are the best I've ever had. However, they cost nearly as much as a friggen suit (dress suit)...

I've also had a pair of cheap ($30) louis garneau shorts that were adequate for commuting/rides up to about 30 miles. However, the chamois broke down within 6 months (and I always line dry.)

Just my opinion/what I've learned over the years...

God bless and safe cycling!

DaveK
02-22-2012, 09:04 AM
I guess it depends on definition of "recreational cyclist"... I ride about 5K per year, and am definitely just a recreational cyclist. I also do agree that ANY padded cycling short is better than cotton undies. However, when you ride 40 to 60 miles on a regular basis, the difference between a cheap entry level short/chamois and a "good one" becomes light-years away from each-other...

That being said: good sales at REI, Performancebike, and nashbar (as well as sites like bonktown.com and realcyclist.com) can save you hundreds of dollars! I just make sure I've tried on the stuff before buying online... as sizes/fit are SO different from manufacturer to manufacturer.

Also, how you wash/dry them makes a huge difference as to the longevity of the chamois.

I love my pearl izumo P.R.O. stuff, and can say that the bibs I bought are the best I've ever had. However, they cost nearly as much as a friggen suit (dress suit)...

I've also had a pair of cheap ($30) louis garneau shorts that were adequate for commuting/rides up to about 30 miles. However, the chamois broke down within 6 months (and I always line dry.)

Just my opinion/what I've learned over the years...

God bless and safe cycling!

Couldn't have said it better, except to add one thing. Bib shorts are your friend. If you're going to go ahead and dress for cycling - jerseys and spandex and whatnot - you really should wear bib shorts instead of regular shorts. You will look like an old-timey strongman until you put your jersey on but once you try bib shorts, you won't buy anything else.

Dirt
02-22-2012, 09:20 AM
However, they cost nearly as much as a friggen suit (dress suit)...
You can get a dress suit at a thrift shop for under $20. ;)

jabberwocky
02-22-2012, 09:36 AM
I guess it depends on definition of "recreational cyclist"... I ride about 5K per year, and am definitely just a recreational cyclist. I also do agree that ANY padded cycling short is better than cotton undies. However, when you ride 40 to 60 miles on a regular basis, the difference between a cheap entry level short/chamois and a "good one" becomes light-years away from each-other...I've ridden 80-90 miles many times on my cheap nashbar shorts and been fine. I have some Performance Ultra shorts too (which retail for 80ish, though they can be found for half that on sale). They are certainly better than the cheap ones, but not massively so.

Everyone is different, obviously. I just get nervous when people start saying you NEED super expensive cycling clothing. Its one of those things that seems like an impediment to new riders.

thecyclingeconomist
02-23-2012, 11:11 PM
I just get nervous when people start saying you NEED super expensive cycling clothing. Its one of those things that seems like an impediment to new riders.

Agreed: however... it does depend on rider weight too. I guess I should have mentioned that. I'm a clydesdale at my fittest (always 180+ and more like around 200lbs.) Shorts/chamois/saddles are a GIGANTIC (and primary) place where money equivocates to comfort for me. Much rather have those three be great and buy an ultegra equipped bike and have the bike weigh a whopping lb. more than a dura-ace bike and save at least a grand on the component cost. (oh yeah... I can lose a lb. easily in five days for free too.)

~TCE

Arlingtonrider
02-25-2012, 10:10 AM
I'd argue against toe cages or straps. I've found that running shoes with pedals and properly tightened toe cages are much harder to release from cleanly than any clipless solution I've used. There is a consistency of release with a clipless system that you can't get with toe cages. If you can get easily out of toe cages, they're not tight enough to be doing you any good on pedal stroke or getting used to being connected to the bike.

Everything else, I agree with, and you can always get the Shimano M324 (http://goo.gl/Ybxj9) pedal that is flat on one side and has an SPD clip on the other.

This is a reply to an old post, but I wanted to share this info in case it might be helpful to anyone. I ride with the straps on my toe cages fastened but extremely loose, per the advice of an excellent fitter at Conte's. While the front and top of the toe cage help immensely in powering, I can still get in and out of the clips very quickly and easily. It might depend on getting the right size toe cages, including the right height for your shoe so there isn't any up and down play, and the right length for positioning your foot properly on the pedal, for the size and type of shoes you plan to use them with. I wear womens' size running shoes. When I had the straps tighter, before the fitting, I wasn't getting my foot all the way forward in the clip, and that was contributing to other problems. Maybe I just got lucky in getting toe cages that fit so well, but I'm very happy with the way it's all working out now and have no problems getting in and out of them.
(Clipless pedals and shoes weren't a good everyday option for me because I usually mix my riding with a lot of walking, and don't want to carry extra shoes with me for walking distances comfortably.)

acc
02-25-2012, 03:10 PM
I never thought about it before but I ride with three different pedal configurations. Furthermore, I've fallen out of each type.

Crank Brothers - Eggbeaters on my cross bike: By far the easiest to manage

Look System - On Spartacus, my road bike: I learned on these and shed many tears of frustration while I learned. It took me a good four months to get used to them.

SPD - On my commuter bike: I'm still not entirely comfortable with these. For me, they are harder to twist out of.

Flat pedals - On my commuter bike: I have the flat on one side, SPD on the other. With a pair of low-heeled cowboy boots, flat pedals are kinda fun. The heel catches right inside the groove of the pedal and it's almost like being clipped in.

As for bib shorts etc, by all means please buy bib shorts. I'm certainly not going to complain. :D

But in my experience better quality makes a difference. If I'm rummaging around looking for a pair of shorts to put on, I'll choose my nicer ones just because they are more comfortable. I also have a lot of cheap ones and a bike skirt or two for days I wanna channel my inner cheerleader.

But the best shorts in the world won't make up for a bad saddle or even a saddle that's out of proper alignment.

An uncomfortable saddle can turn a wonderful outing into a long nightmare.

ann

rcannon100
05-22-2012, 07:53 AM
Reviving an old thread - and reading through it, it is very informative but adds more questions.

Succumbing to peer pressure, I went clipless. I bought Pearl Izumi SPD shoes with pedals that are flat on one side and SPD thingy on the other. LOVE IT. Would definitely say I found another gear or two, and another few miles per hour.

BUT here is the thing - and someone mentioned it a few posts back. I have an old sprained ankle. Torquing my foot out of my pedal puts strain on the foot exactly on the spot of the old sprain. After BTWD I could barely walk. I read thru stuff, and am confident that it is not ankling (its in the front of the foot, not the back).

Is there a solution to this? Are Egg Beaters easier to get out of?

My solution is to by different shoes. If I cant get the shoe off the pedal; I could get the foot out of the shoe. Get velcro strap shoes and just take them on and off.

But reading through the posts, the comment about bad knees and float also concern me.

First, is there a solution to getting out of the pedal and the pain it is causing my foot? Second, is that the same answer for float and bad knees?

Gracious.

mstone
05-22-2012, 08:32 AM
Reviving an old thread - and reading through it, it is very informative but adds more questions.

Succumbing to peer pressure, I went clipless. I bought Pearl Izumi SPD shoes with pedals that are flat on one side and SPD thingy on the other. LOVE IT. Would definitely say I found another gear or two, and another few miles per hour.

BUT here is the thing - and someone mentioned it a few posts back. I have an old sprained ankle. Torquing my foot out of my pedal puts strain on the foot exactly on the spot of the old sprain. After BTWD I could barely walk. I read thru stuff, and am confident that it is not ankling (its in the front of the foot, not the back).

Is there a solution to this? Are Egg Beaters easier to get out of?

My solution is to by different shoes. If I cant get the shoe off the pedal; I could get the foot out of the shoe. Get velcro strap shoes and just take them on and off.

But reading through the posts, the comment about bad knees and float also concern me.

First, is there a solution to getting out of the pedal and the pain it is causing my foot? Second, is that the same answer for float and bad knees?

Gracious.

Have you adjusted the screw on the pedal that changes the clipping force? Try just turning that down. Alternatively, there's a version of the SPD clip that allows you to unclip in any direction.

rcannon100
05-22-2012, 08:37 AM
Have you adjusted the screw on the pedal that changes the clipping force? Try just turning that down. Alternatively, there's a version of the SPD clip that allows you to unclip in any direction.

Yup. Thanks for the suggestion. I have been scanning pedals for information about float and other specs - there is very little information out there. Do you have a rec for the SPD clip that allows unclip in any direction.

Gracious.

KLizotte
05-22-2012, 09:21 AM
I went clipless for the first time this weekend and loved it! :D

I got SPD pedals that have the cleat on one side and flat pedal on the other and Specialized MTB shoes (so I can walk around easily). No problems clipping out at all and only minor issues with clipping in on occasion. I find having to flip the pedal to the correct side to be an occasional annoyance so I may eventually go with a double sided pedal but it's not a big deal at the moment. I went for a 48 mile ride in Baltimore on Sunday that included lots city riding and hills so there were many opportunities to clip/unclip and try them out on some big hills. My legs felt fine the next day and the clipless made the hills easier to go up.

Unfortunately it turns out the shoes were half a size too small for my feet and my toes kept hitting the end of the shoes. The LBS was kind enough to take them back and order me a different pair in another size. Keeping my fingers crossed these fit better! Until they come in I can continue to ride the bike on the flat side of the pedals.

Note: I was previously riding with PowerGrip straps so I was already used to having my feet attached to the pedals and having to kick my heels outwards to disengage. I think I would have had a harder time adapting to clipless if I didn't have the PowerGrips experience. I also have the tension on the cleats quite low but was pleasantly surprised to discover they didn't pop up when out of the saddle going uphill.

Other than that, I love clipless. I'm hoping and praying my new shoes arrive and fit in time for the long weekend.

creadinger
05-22-2012, 10:41 AM
Yup. Thanks for the suggestion. I have been scanning pedals for information about float and other specs - there is very little information out there. Do you have a rec for the SPD clip that allows unclip in any direction.

I was on a ride in Delaware a couple of years ago and stopped at a shop to have them replace my rear derailleur cable... anyway, the guy and I got to talking about good pedals for touring/commuting etc.. and he mentioned Speedplay Frogs as an upgrade over the traditional SPDs. I don't know much about them because I never ended up getting a pair but they seem pretty cool. The FAQ says they're easier to clip into and out of since they're not spring tensioned like SPDs. I'm not sure, but you may need to get new shoes though to be compatible with these pedals...

http://www.speedplay.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=home.frog

Just in case you haven't looked down this avenue yet.

brendan
05-22-2012, 11:31 AM
Alternatively, there's a version of the SPD clip that allows you to unclip in any direction.

Note: you need to be cautious about this, your foot length and your bike geometry. I first rode clipless on the xtracycle and had a unidirectional clip/cleat setup. When I started training on a road bike, I learned (the hard way) that rotating my heel inward is a possible way to have the heel of my shoe strike my rear spokes.

Brendan

PS - A friend also noted that when I ride bikes without clipless pedals, I still rotate my heels outward before stepping down. Probably best to have that ingrained...

PPS - Oh and as KLizotte said: I suspect starting with powergrips made my transition into clipless pedals much easier.

mstone
05-22-2012, 12:19 PM
Yup. Thanks for the suggestion. I have been scanning pedals for information about float and other specs - there is very little information out there. Do you have a rec for the SPD clip that allows unclip in any direction.

The ones that come with the pedals are SH-51's, the others are the SH-56's. The obvious caveat is that if you can yank them out any which way, they'll also be less secure. Depending on your needs, the might suit.

jabberwocky
05-22-2012, 12:24 PM
BUT here is the thing - and someone mentioned it a few posts back. I have an old sprained ankle. Torquing my foot out of my pedal puts strain on the foot exactly on the spot of the old sprain. After BTWD I could barely walk. I read thru stuff, and am confident that it is not ankling (its in the front of the foot, not the back).

Is there a solution to this? Are Egg Beaters easier to get out of?Eggbeaters work roughly the same way as SPDs. My recommendation would be Speedplay frogs. The technique is the same (rotate the ankle to get out), but they have no spring tension, and as such are usually recommended for folks with ankle or knee problems.

They do use the same shoes as other MTB pedals.

Lt. Dan
05-22-2012, 02:10 PM
I've been riding SPD mountain bike pedals for about 15 years... I like them so much, I just moved my old SPD's to my road bike, and put new SPD's on the mountain bike! :)

KelOnWheels
05-22-2012, 05:39 PM
I have SPDs on my mountain bike... they're probably worth more than the bike ;)

rcannon100
05-22-2012, 08:02 PM
Today REI sold me a cleat that is suppose to release in multiple directions, not just laterally. That's the cheap solution. If that doesnt work, I will try the Frogs. They look cool. REI salesperson said she didnt like them bc they have too much float. But for me that might be a feature.

Got a new helmet, a new trunk, and some new shirts as well. BOY this cycling thing sure is saving me money! :rolleyes:

Thanks for the help.

hencio
05-22-2012, 08:22 PM
I've been thinking about switching to frogs, but I've got several pairs of SPDs. Apparently I am far too cheap to switch! For what it is worth, I notice that when the SPD cleats are new, they can be a little tight. But they seem to wear in and seem to loosen up and are much easier to get out of.

SteveTheTech
05-24-2012, 11:14 AM
I am a new convert to a Look setup. I had SPDs on my bike. It worked great for a while, I had a bit of an issue going from the spin bike at the gym to my real life bike but other than that the convenience of having MTB shoes on a ride outdoors here was my main justification for keeping them for so long. I was very reluctant to cross over to much tinier contact points and more involved clips.

Initially I was not keep on clipping my second foot into the Looks. Prime example of when dual sided pedals win was Tuesday on a group ride. We came down the hill on Belle Haven at the shopping center and are taking off from the light there. It is a mildly competive group. I've got one shoe in and start moving but have stepped on the opposite pedal upside down. Now moving >20 mph with some hustle and I cannot get the other pedal flipped easily. I feel like it is muscle memory that will develop over time but loosing a few upstrokes is still costly when it comes down to it. I can see why many people prefer lollipops.

I have however noticed an immediate improvement while on the computrainer. Power transfer is increased nicely and fatigue of my feet is down significantly.

I plan to try these for a little while longer but my shoes have spd holes and may be getting those if they keep aggrivating me, although I can only imagine that that would make those shoes nearly impossible to walk in.

JimK
05-31-2012, 08:33 PM
On my road bikes I have Speedplay's Frog pedal/cleat. The cleat is recessed, which is essential for me when communing (I have nearly killed myself walking on tile floors with protruding cleats). Also, the Frog has great play and holds up well. In my experience the pedals last forever. I usually replace cleats every 3-4 thousand miles (replacement cleats are about $30). Lubing the cleat and pedal helps to prolong the life of the cleat. The Frog also is self cleaning (for the most part). They are more popular among mountain bikers, but they work well on road bikes or hybrids.

GuyContinental
06-01-2012, 07:17 AM
On my road bikes I have Speedplay's Frog pedal/cleat. The cleat is recessed, which is essential for me when communing (I have nearly killed myself walking on tile floors with protruding cleats). Also, the Frog has great play and holds up well. In my experience the pedals last forever. I usually replace cleats every 3-4 thousand miles (replacement cleats are about $30). Lubing the cleat and pedal helps to prolong the life of the cleat. The Frog also is self cleaning (for the most part). They are more popular among mountain bikers, but they work well on road bikes or hybrids.

Although I don't use them (I use Speedplay X2 and Eggbeaters) I think that Frogs are probably one of the best commuter pedals out there- lots of contact with the cleat, no complicated parts, free float, ability to use a MTB shoe. I think that I said this in another thread but a stiff carbon MTB shoe plus a MTB pedal will give the 95%+ of the power and stability of a traditional road shoe/pedal combo and be a heck of a lot easier to clip into and walk on. Obviously, if you are a racer, the reduced ground clearance and small loss of power makes MTB pedals nearly a breaker, but for the rest of us they are fine.

That said, there is a HUGE difference between a stiff shoe and a floppy shoe. I've had great luck and lots and lots of miles with the Specialized Comp Carbon series (both MTB and Road) and they aren't ridiculously expensive ($150)

rcannon100
06-06-2012, 08:12 AM
Got Frogs yesterday from REI.

First, I installed them backwards. :rolleyes:

Boy are they different! In terms of causing pain to an old sprained ankle - none. There is none of that snapping motion that is required to release the SPDs I had. You just float off the pedal. Slide off.

Second, knees. Again, the float is tremendous. I really dont think my knees were enjoying having my feet stiffly clamped to the pedal. The saleswoman said she didnt like Frogs because they had too much float. I can see what she means!!! For me, that's going to be a feature. But it is a tremendously different feel. It is going to take some time to get confident with them.

And for those keeping track, I dropped another $200 at the bike store. New pedals, new yellow shirt, cog brush, grease. Just love how much cycling saves me money (and before anyone takes me two seriously, we are a one car family ---- yes, that saves a tremendous amount of money!)

TwoWheelsDC
06-06-2012, 05:19 PM
Maybe sorta threadjacking here...I have reversible SPD pedals on my commuter and put the same ones on my road bike for simplicity...but now I'm thinking of putting proper road pedals on the road bike (probably spd-sl, as that system seems to do a serviceable job of acting like a platform pedal for the times I ride without my cycling shoes).

The real question for me is whether I just buy two sets so I can put a set on my commuter as well, or just change up the road bike. Changing both bikes would keep me from having to have two pairs of shoes laying around and would expand my shoe options, but I do like the walkability of my MTB shoes. Anyone commute with spd-sl cleats and like/dislike it?

vvill
06-06-2012, 09:16 PM
Personally I like having one universal set of interchangeable cleats + pedals and walkable shoes. But each to their own/YMMV

I have 3 sets of Crank Bros pedals/cleats. Never failed me yet, and clips in a lot faster than most of the casual road pedal group riders.

americancyclo
06-07-2012, 08:10 AM
I've had great luck and lots and lots of miles with the Specialized Comp Carbon series (both MTB and Road) and they aren't ridiculously expensive ($150)
I've been looking at these to replace my 8+ year old Shimano MTB shoes. The new version has the BOA lacing which I like since I have narrow feet, and I can still use my SPD cleats and pedals until I can afford a set of Speedplays. Upgrade in increments...

eminva
06-07-2012, 08:17 AM
Hello All --

When I had my fitting with Clovis, the one thing I complained of was foot pain, so he had me switch from my old, flexible soled MTB shoes/SPD pedals to a road bike shoe with a stiff sole and Look pedals.

A week in, I am finally starting to get used to how much more difficult it is to clip in (clipping out seems to be the same), but I'm worried the cleats are going to wear down fast. I have to drop a foot a lot commuting 28 miles a day. One week in, they are already showing some wear (especially on the right side, which is the foot I drop). As soon as I noticed this I started putting them on on my front porch and switching to flip flops at the garage at work so I am not walking on them at all. I swear I do not do a Flintstone stop so I don't think I'm dragging them on the ground at all.

Do any of you have experience with this? What do you do to preserve the life of road bike cleats?

Thanks.

Liz

Certifried
06-07-2012, 09:39 AM
I swear I do not do a Flintstone stop so I don't think I'm dragging them on the ground at all.

Do any of you have experience with this? What do you do to preserve the life of road bike cleats?

Thanks.

Liz

Liz,

Thank you, so much, for the visual this morning! LOL My question is what's the best way to clean coffee off my monitor and keyboard?

I have SPD-SL (same things basically) also with a stiff road shoe. I haven't had them all that long, but have also noticed wear on mine. So I looked in to this a little bit. First, they can wear pretty far down before they have to be replaced. You don't need to worry about it until the color portion is completely worn through, or if the clipping in/out isn't as smooth. I do flintstone stops, walk around in my shoes, and am always stopping for red lights, stop signs, etc. So I'm always clipping in/out. I haven't worn down mine far enough to replace, even though they look pretty ragged. So, just check the color indicators to see how far down that is. Maybe not as far as you think.

When it does come time to replace, definitely look around for prices. I know for the SPD-SL cleats, I've seen prices anywhere from $20 to $30, so a pretty large difference depending on where you buy them.

Here's a picture of a worn cleat
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v223/botto/photo-32.jpg

time to change!

one suggestion I saw to lengthen the life of the cleats is, rather than walking, scoot around on your butt
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nhwbS-Y-6ls

Dirt
06-07-2012, 10:12 AM
It has been years since I rode Look road pedals, but I used to get pretty good wear out of the cleats. Where they usually got thin was at the toe-end. The little tab that sticks into the front of the pedal would get pretty thin. The back was never really a problem.

There are companies that make little rubber things that fit over the cleats when you need to walk. 1) they give you more traction so you don't slip around; and b) they keep you from wearing the cleats out. These are for the Keo's http://www.amazon.com/Look-Road-Bike-Cleat-Cover/dp/B000UDBLQO

TSFKAC (The Shop Formerly Known as Conte's... aka FreshBikes) will have them in stock.

Have the stiffer soles helped your foot pain?

eminva
06-07-2012, 03:51 PM
There are companies that make little rubber things that fit over the cleats when you need to walk. 1) they give you more traction so you don't slip around; and b) they keep you from wearing the cleats out. These are for the Keo's http://www.amazon.com/Look-Road-Bike-Cleat-Cover/dp/B000UDBLQO

TSFKAC (The Shop Formerly Known as Conte's... aka FreshBikes) will have them in stock.

Have the stiffer soles helped your foot pain?

Thank you for the suggestion -- will try to get a pair of those asap.

Yes, my feet are feeling much better. That might also have something to do with the cleat being properly situated under the ball of my foot, rather than the middle of my arch (only a slight exaggeration).

Thanks, all!

Liz

txgoonie
06-08-2012, 08:59 AM
I'm rocking the Speedplay Zeros and while I like the interface and how easy it is to clip in, I have never liked the cleats themselves. They're so darn high profile and with the coffee shop caps, like the ones Dirt linked to above, they're like reverse stilettos. And my main problem is that I slip around on them, which is no fun when you're walking through your office lobby which is polished granite or when you're pushing off from a dead stop. Stop light on an incline? Major fun times. Push off just a little bit, and my foot rockets back behind me and I can barely get going. So does anyone have a home remedy for the slippiness? Do other road pedal/cleat systems not have that issue?

KLizotte
06-08-2012, 09:19 AM
FYI to newbies on clipless systems. This is a nice article (with lots of pictures) on some of the differences and how to use clipless:

http://drivemybike.wordpress.com/tag/pedals/

jrenaut
06-10-2012, 07:58 AM
I just bought shoes and SPDs yesterday. It took me 5 minutes on the trainer at the shop to get one foot clipped in, even with guidance from the staff. I'm going out this afternoon during kid nap time to do circles around the parking lot by my house and practice. It remains to be seen whether I commute in the shoes on Monday. The pedals have flat backs, so I have options.

KLizotte
06-10-2012, 11:25 AM
I just bought shoes and SPDs yesterday. It took me 5 minutes on the trainer at the shop to get one foot clipped in, even with guidance from the staff. I'm going out this afternoon during kid nap time to do circles around the parking lot by my house and practice. It remains to be seen whether I commute in the shoes on Monday. The pedals have flat backs, so I have options.

Loosen up the tension up as much as you can; that makes it a lot easier to clip in and out.

jrenaut
06-10-2012, 11:30 AM
Loosen up the tension up as much as you can; that makes it a lot easier to clip in and out.
Yeah, they loosened it up all the way before I even tried. I'm told I will need it tightened back up after just a few rides - that seems absurd at the moment, but I probably said the same thing when I started off with toe clips years ago.

jrenaut
06-10-2012, 12:32 PM
Ok, after a mile in little circles in the parking lot by my house, I feel a lot better. Maybe I was just uncomfortable on the trainer, or maybe I magically got the feel for where my feet need to be while I was sleeping, but I feel comfortable enough with the pedals and shoes to use them on my ride to work tomorrow. Glad that it seems to be easier for me to get my right foot in and out, and that's the foot I usually put down.

TwoWheelsDC
06-10-2012, 01:23 PM
I just bought shoes and SPDs yesterday. It took me 5 minutes on the trainer at the shop to get one foot clipped in, even with guidance from the staff. I'm going out this afternoon during kid nap time to do circles around the parking lot by my house and practice. It remains to be seen whether I commute in the shoes on Monday. The pedals have flat backs, so I have options.

Funny, I just switched to SPD-SLs on my road bike and was having a hell of a time getting clipped in because it's a bit different than the SPDs I'm so used to. With SPDs, it is so intuitive to me that I just put ut my foot down and I'm clipped without the slightest effort. But it did take me a few days to get used to the SPDs initially, so I'm sure it'll be the same for the SLs, and I'm sure you'll be used to it in no time.

Which pedals did you get? I just pulled the Shimano A530s off my road bike...I also have a set on my commuter and I may just keep running both systems since SPDs are so much more walkable.

jrenaut
06-10-2012, 01:41 PM
Which pedals did you get? I just pulled the Shimano A530s off my road bike...I also have a set on my commuter and I may just keep running both systems since SPDs are so much more walkable.
Shimano A530s is exactly what I got. I rode home from the shop in my regular shoes on the flat side and it was fine, so I feel good about the pedals.

jrenaut
06-11-2012, 01:38 PM
Okay, that ride home was awesome. No problem with the shoes, though I think once I've ridden with them a little i'm going to need to tweak some things. I came down the long straightaway at Hains Point along the water and concentrated on pulling up as I was pushing down. I think it added 5mph to the speed I usually hit along that stretch.

Am I correct in assuming that the downside of loosening the tension to make it easier to clip/unclip is that your foot isn't held in quite as tight? It took about 4 miles of total riding to start noticing that my left foot is locked in more tightly. That's the foot I keep locked in all the time, so I think the guy at the shop left it tighter.

TwoWheelsDC
06-11-2012, 01:58 PM
Am I correct in assuming that the downside of loosening the tension to make it easier to clip/unclip is that your foot isn't held in quite as tight? It took about 4 miles of total riding to start noticing that my left foot is locked in more tightly. That's the foot I keep locked in all the time, so I think the guy at the shop left it tighter.

I've never come unclipped, even when I first started out and had the tension cranked almost all the way down. However, when I got a new bike, I had the shop put a new set of pedals on it, thus leaving the old pedals on the old bike. I rode the new bike for a while, without readjusting the pedal tension, before using the old bike again and couldn't believe how un-secure I felt on the old pedals. I barely had to move my foot to unclip. It was then that I realized that I much prefer a tighter clip-in/clip-out. With the new SPD-SLs that I got, the tension seems pretty low and I barely have to press my foot down to clip in once I have my foot in the correct spot...definitely need to crank up the tension.

Tim Kelley
06-11-2012, 02:03 PM
I came down the long straightaway at Hains Point along the water and concentrated on pulling up as I was pushing down. I think it added 5mph to the speed I usually hit along that stretch.

A technique tip a friend gave me once--try not to think about pulling "up" but rather try to envision yourself pedaling perfect circles (or flat ovals if that's easier to imagine). You can try pedaling with only one leg to get a feel for where there are gaps in your upstroke.

jrenaut
06-11-2012, 03:16 PM
A technique tip a friend gave me once--try not to think about pulling "up" but rather try to envision yourself pedaling perfect circles (or flat ovals if that's easier to imagine). You can try pedaling with only one leg to get a feel for where there are gaps in your upstroke.
Makes sense. I'll try that next time.

Bilsko
06-23-2012, 08:27 AM
Liz - a bit late to this thread, but I'm in the process of getting a new set of pedals/cleats so I figured I'd see what everyone on the forum had to say

I've been riding on Look Delta's on my road bike for several years now and have been pleased. Its a commuter bike so I do a decent/moderate amount of walking on the cleats. (Some on brick stones, dirt-rocks, and sidewalk)
I've found that I burn through a set once every 8 months or so (sometimes 6, sometimes 10) I tend to run them pretty ragged though, so you may want to err on the shorter side. Both of these cleats are end of life. First one is left side:
1240
Second is the right, the foot I drop:
1239
The white section of the front tab - I think Pete mentioned it a couple posts back - is a decent indicator of just how much (or little) life the cleat has

Delta cleats are getting harder and harder to come by since Look made the switch to Keo so I've been giving thought to switching. How has your experience been with the Look's so far? I assume you're on one of the Keo models - which one?

eminva
06-23-2012, 09:12 AM
Delta cleats are getting harder and harder to come by since Look made the switch to Keo so I've been giving thought to switching. How has your experience been with the Look's so far? I assume you're on one of the Keo models - which one?

Thanks for the info and for the photos -- very helpful. I will just plan to replace them every six to ten months (and be pleasantly surprised if I get more life). I got the cleat covers that Dirt mentioned. I put them on in the garage at work for the walk to my office (which is a little longer than you might think because the garage is in a different building).

I have the Keo Classic and so far, so good. Clipping in took some adjustment switching from SPD to Look, but I think I'm getting the hang of it. Otherwise, I very much like them.

On a side note, I had my first ever failure-to-clip-out-in-time fall on Thursday. Unrelated to the pedals. I was coming to a near stop and at the last second decided to go left rather than straight. Boom. Only my son saw me and no harm done, other than being the proud owner of a scraped knee. And my son got to hear me use vocabulary he'd only ever heard in Boy Scouts.

Liz

Bilsko
06-25-2012, 07:46 AM
Thanks for the update. I decided to go with a pair of the Keo Max after all. Found a good deal online from planet cyclery through eBay. $100. One of the shops wanted 180 for them! I'm all for supporting my LBS - and have thrown plenty of money their way over the past few years, but a 80% markup is a bit much.

SteveTheTech
06-28-2012, 02:24 PM
That said, there is a HUGE difference between a stiff shoe and a floppy shoe. I've had great luck and lots and lots of miles with the Specialized Comp Carbon series (both MTB and Road) and they aren't ridiculously expensive ($150)

Truer words have not been spoken. The difference is amazing. I don't know that I could go back. I miss the practicality of my MTB sneakers but the transfer in the carbon soled shoes is awesome.




When I had my fitting with Clovis, the one thing I complained of was foot pain, so he had me switch from my old, flexible soled MTB shoes/SPD pedals to a road bike shoe with a stiff sole and Look pedals.

Do any of you have experience with this? What do you do to preserve the life of road bike cleats?



My wife had the same exact issue when getting Clovis to fit her. Great fitter, awesome after sale support there, I cannot speak highly enough about their operation

She left there with the same setup. Although it didn't work as well for her. She hit the dirt several times before she was able to mount her pretty new Ruby. Needless to say she swapped out the Looks for her platforms with SPDs and MTB shoes again. It works for her, she can now balance and is quite happy.

I stole her old pedals and had the exact problem you had with getting into the damned things. Especially when trying to take off in a social race situation, or up a hill. For the fun of it I swapped out the Looks for the old double sided SPDs with my new road shoes...that was by far the worst decision I have made on a bicycle. Hitting the mark with the tiny little cleat and nothing to guide me in was a disaster. At one point I hit a speed bump while not clipped in to either pedal (after half a mile of trying) and fell off the saddle. They are going back into the box and into storage. I'll learn to love the Looks or swap to Frogs at some point.

Those cleat covers work wonders. I keep them in my back pocket, I was actually able to run about a 1/2 mile in my road shoes with the on. I had to actually sand a small portion of the rubber down on the edges as it was starting to peel a little. They seem to really improve the balance of standing in them. At least on dry concrete...I cannot imagine anything helping the traction on wet granite.

Bilsko
06-28-2012, 02:43 PM
For the fun of it I swapped out the Looks for the old double sided SPDs with my new road shoes...that was by far the worst decision I have made on a bicycle. Hitting the mark with the tiny little cleat and nothing to guide me in was a disaster. At one point I hit a speed bump while not clipped in to either pedal (after half a mile of trying) and fell off the saddle. They are going back into the box and into storage. I'll learn to love the Looks or swap to Frogs at some point.

Those cleat covers work wonders. I keep them in my back pocket, I was actually able to run about a 1/2 mile in my road shoes with the on. I had to actually sand a small portion of the rubber down on the edges as it was starting to peel a little. They seem to really improve the balance of standing in them. At least on dry concrete...I cannot imagine anything helping the traction on wet granite.

I got my Look Keos in the mail yesterday and installed them last night. I went for a quick ride around the block as the sun was setting and (despite almost getting run over) didn't have too much trouble getting clipped in.
This morning on my ride to work, I did have trouble taking off with cars behind me at a couple of lights. I'm changing to the KEOs from a much older set of Look Delta-model pedals and it seems to be a bit tougher to get clipped in.

Yours is the second recommendation I've read for the cleat covers, so I'm going to spring for those soon too.

JorgeGortex
07-09-2012, 12:29 PM
I run Time MTB pedals on all my bikes (aside from the downhill and dirt jumpers, which run flats). I've previously run Shimano SPDs; I prefer Times, but the Shimanos are ok too. Pedals are kinda personal. Everyone has their preferences. The truth is that they are all good, it just depends on what you want.

Me too. I have Time ATAC mtb pedals on my mt. bike, road, and commuter. I find them pretty easy to get into and out of. They hold up well, and in the few times that I've biffed (on my mtb) my feet have popped right out as if on cue (bike slid out on an off camber, leaf covered, slope) as I went down. Mtb shoes and pedals may be a bit heavier on a road bike, but it makes walking a lot easier. Plus you never have to find the right shoes etc. Just grab and go.

JorgeGortex

JustinW
07-16-2012, 07:53 PM
Reviving this thread to seek recommendations for shoes, specifically shoes for wide-footed sorts like me. Any brands reliably comfy for wide feet?

rcannon100
07-16-2012, 08:38 PM
Same answer as always.


What do you want to use it for?

Me, I am a commuter. I want shoes I can walk into the office or into a store with. I recently bought Pearl Izumi X-Alp Seek IV Bike Shoes (http://www.rei.com/product/810725/pearl-izumi-x-alp-seek-iv-bike-shoes-mens) amd have tremendously liked them. No, they are not a full walking shoe; but they are good enuf if you are not doing that much walking. No they are not a stiff bike shoe you would use for centuries; i don ride centuries. This is a good hybrid that lets me do enough walking around to cheat it. And yes, they are a bit wide. One thing, they are lace shoes. The laces tuck into a little pocket in the tongue of the shoe so they do disappear but otherwise you wood knot opt for laces on a bike shoo.

DaveK
07-16-2012, 09:24 PM
Reviving this thread to seek recommendations for shoes, specifically shoes for wide-footed sorts like me. Any brands reliably comfy for wide feet?

Shimano road shoes generally run wider in the toe box than other brands, but you can get Sidis in wide (they call it Mega) as well.

TwoWheelsDC
07-16-2012, 10:11 PM
FWIW, I've got a pair of LG road shoes and they fit pretty narrow...I had to go a size up from my very roomy Specialized mountain shoes and they are still snug in the width department. So yeah, LG probably isn't the brand for you, but Specialized might work.

5555624
07-17-2012, 05:49 AM
Reviving this thread to seek recommendations for shoes, specifically shoes for wide-footed sorts like me. Any brands reliably comfy for wide feet?

Lake makes road and MTB shoes in wide sizes. I like the MX101's.

GuyContinental
07-17-2012, 07:34 AM
Reviving this thread to seek recommendations for shoes, specifically shoes for wide-footed sorts like me. Any brands reliably comfy for wide feet?

I accidentally* bought a pair of Specialized Carbon Pro MTB shoes in a "wide" size and can attest that they have some serious girth. Also amazing stiff all-around shoes.



*Someday I'll learn to READ the dang ebay listing before bidding