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View Full Version : New to road bikes and wondering between two



QuantFail
02-09-2012, 08:11 AM
http://www.orbea.com/us-us/bicis/modelos/orca_b105/#presentacion

or

http://www.cervelo.com/en_us/bikes/2012/S2/

Any thoughts? They are both in relatively the same price range. They just caught my eye, because I like their "look". Originally I had wanted to purchase a "semi-used" bike (56 cm) for under $1000 and ride that for 6-months and then purchase something very nice, but I just haven't had any luck finding something decent. Usually they are priced only a few hundred dollars below what a brand new one would cost, so no point. Thanks in advance for any tips. Cheers.

DaveK
02-09-2012, 08:59 AM
Have you ridden both?

DismalScientist
02-09-2012, 08:59 AM
While these bikes are not particularly in my comfort zone (Steel is Real!), one way to save cash may be to go to online retailers. Buying online requires some minimal technical competence by the customer. That said, I'm happy with the touring bike I got from Nashbar and saved roughly 40% from comparable retail.

QuantFail
02-09-2012, 09:10 AM
Don't laugh, but I have never rode a Road bike, only Mountain Bikes, as that is what I have been doing for the past 2-years. As mentioned before this was he reason I was trying to avoid buying a brand new Road bike, but haven't had any luck finding a good starter. Again, just looking at this two, because I like the "look". I don't know much about the technical(s) of a bike. Therefore I can't check out a bike online and read the components and understand anything. Furthermore if I ordered online it would require assembly, and I am sure I could not assemble a bike.

I'd like to just know which bike in your opinion is the most bike for my buck. Either from the two I listed, or any other products in your mind. Thanks.

P.S. as far as the frame, Steel isn't for me. I would like to stick to Full carbon or Alu/Carbon forks if the deal is good. Wouldn't go below Carbon and not spending 10k on Titanium.

jrenaut
02-09-2012, 09:13 AM
You should really find a shop that has them so you can try them out. The bike that I loved online just didn't fit me at all when I actually rode it.

dasgeh
02-09-2012, 09:23 AM
For me, fit is king. Bike shops are good at helping you find the best fit. Many even include a fit in the purchase of the bike. I'd recommend finding the LBS's (local bike shops) that are most convenient to your life. Most also include a year of service with a new bike, and you'll definitely need to take it in after a month or two to have cables tightened. Any good LBS can explain to you what you're paying for in the various levels of frames and components. You may be able to get exactly the same thing cheaper online, but you won't get the advice, fit and service. For me, it was totally worth buying local, and I'm super cheap.

From experience, I can recommend CycleLife and Bicycle Pro Shop, both in Georgetown. All else equal, Cyclelife is a little more newby friendly, BPS more old school bike shop (crowded with bikes, racers consistently coming through). Both are great, and I think carry different brands.

dasgeh
02-09-2012, 09:24 AM
And good luck. Those are nice bikes.

eminva
02-09-2012, 09:40 AM
All sound advice, especially to let fit be the deciding factor and to go with a very "local" local bike shop. I would visit several. Take advantage of test rides as you have not been on a road bike before, just to get a sense of handling.

You mentioned that you ride a mountain bike already; if you have a relationship with a bike shop for your mountain bike you might ask there what they recommend.

Liz

DismalScientist
02-09-2012, 09:45 AM
Don't laugh, but I have never rode a Road bike, only Mountain Bikes, as that is what I have been doing for the past 2-years. As mentioned before this was he reason I was trying to avoid buying a brand new Road bike, but haven't had any luck finding a good starter. Again, just looking at this two, because I like the "look".

I agree with everyone regarding going to an LBS and the importance of fit. That said, before picking a particular bike, you should ask yourself how and why you are likely to ride it. Perhaps those bikes are appropriate, but the above quote suggests that you may have narrowed your choices a bit too quickly.

Tim Kelley
02-09-2012, 09:46 AM
And remember, if you find a bike that you love, but hate the way it looks you can always get it repainted if it means that much to you.

I posted this last month, but this my "before" and "after" : http://www.flickr.com/photos/timkelley/sets/72157628801086311/with/6670059731/

americancyclo
02-09-2012, 09:51 AM
you can find Cervelos at Freshbikes (http://freshbikescycling.com/)in arlington or bethesda, or at bonsai (http://tribonzai.com/)in falls church, va.

I'd ride anything before buying it strictly on looks, and I definitely think talking to a sales person about what you want in a bike (look, speed, social cache, weight, durability) will help you find the right bike for you. There are a lot of nice bikes in the sub $3000 range you're looking in.

Greenbelt
02-09-2012, 10:34 AM
Third opinion on fit and feel being what you'll really appreciate in the long run. I hang around at a bike shop and I hear lots of customers say things like "well, I got this one bike that was on sale (or that was highly recommended by a friend, or that got great reviews, or that I read about online), but for some reason it's uncomfortable on my X (or when I X) (or after X miles) etc....

Oftentimes after trying lots of different brands and frame types, people end up with a bike they absolutely love, but it wasn't at all what they were originally looking for!

DaveK
02-09-2012, 11:10 AM
"Road bike" means a whole lot of things these days and about the only thing in common is drop bars and skinny tires. Road bike frames run the gamut from a tall and upright position for more comfort such as a Specialized Roubaix or Cervelo RS, down to a quicker-handing race geometry with a generally lower riding position such as a Cannondale CAAD10 or Specialized Tarmac. All sorts of variables are different on these frames - wheelbase, trail, rake, head and seat tube angles, and all the little differences combine to make a bike with very different handling, fit, and ride. You can adjust your position somewhat on a bike by fiddling with stem length and angle, seatpost setback, and other factors, but the number one thing in fitting a bike is choosing a frame that fits what you want to do with it. Are you looking to ride centuries or just for fun out on the trails? Are you looking to mix it up at weeknight races? These kinds of things help determine what you should be riding. Any kind of bike shop that doesn't start by asking you those questions isn't worth your time and money. The right bike makes all the difference.

QuantFail
02-09-2012, 11:55 AM
I have read a lot of good things about Bonzai and Freshbikes. I live in Rockville, and they are just so far. Thank you for all of the advice, I didn't know "fit" was so important. I just figured all 56 cm would fit like 56ers. I'll go to the shops this weekend and see what they suggest and then go from there.

Also what's the difference between a Tri bike and a Road bike, besides the handle bars. Why are Tri bikes cheaper?

DismalScientist
02-09-2012, 12:37 PM
Also what's the difference between a Tri bike and a Road bike, besides the handle bars. Why are Tri bikes cheaper?

By road bike, I assume you mean racing road bike. The difference should only the handlebars and the frame geometry. You basically pay for a) frame material and quality, b) wheelset quality, c) component level, and d) brand cachet. For a racing and tri bike with the same frame (except geometry), wheels, and components, the price should be the same.

DismalScientist
02-09-2012, 12:46 PM
"Road bike" means a whole lot of things these days and about the only thing in common is drop bars and skinny tires.

I think road bike these days only means it is not a mountain bike (and perhaps not a hybrid or a cruiser). Certainly fixies with flat bars are considered road bikes by many. Traditional touring bikes don't have all that skinny tires, but are likely considered road bikes. I'm not certain I understand the distinction between cross bikes and touring bikes. Perhaps it is a lack of eyelets for attaching a rack and somewhat shorter stays.

DaveK
02-09-2012, 12:52 PM
I think road bike these days only means it is not a mountain bike (and perhaps not a hybrid or a cruiser). Certainly fixies with flat bars are considered road bikes by many. Traditional touring bikes don't have all that skinny tires, but are likely considered road bikes. I'm not certain I understand the distinction between cross bikes and touring bikes. Perhaps it is a lack of eyelets for attaching a rack and somewhat shorter stays.

I'd say the clearances built in for mud and gunk have something to do with it, although I've never examined that variable between a dedicated touring bike and a cross bike. Racy cross bikes will have shorter stays, but I find most have a little longer wheelbase and a little slacker front end geometry than your typical road bike. Both traits common to tourers as well. Eyelets can also be found on most low-mid range cross bikes since so many of us (myself included) are using them as commuters.

Lines are blurring everywhere!

KLizotte
02-09-2012, 01:16 PM
These kinds of things help determine what you should be riding. Any kind of bike shop that doesn't start by asking you those questions isn't worth your time and money. The right bike makes all the difference.

Unfortunately I've found salespeople in LBSs to be a real crapshoot. Sometimes you get someone who is really knowledgeable, attentive and patient; other times, you get someone who doesn't ask any questions, isn't very helpful, and will sell you the first thing you lay your eyes on.

That said, it's best to visit all of your neighborhood shops a few times each. Time consuming yes, but better than having to replace the bike a year later.

WillStewart
02-09-2012, 01:35 PM
You might want to consider a performance recumbent as well. Bikes@Vienna (http://www.bikesatvienna.com/) have a wide variety and you would be surprised at how comfortably fast (http://rbr.info/community/blog/14-travis/209-team-rans-finishes-first-in-raam.html) you will be able to go having great visibility at the same time.

http://thelazyrando.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/bbraam.jpg?w=510&h=380 http://rbr.info/images/stories/blog/2009-06/team-rans-raam-2.jpg

JimF22003
02-09-2012, 02:00 PM
I don't think you want a Tri-specific bike unless you intend to do triathlons (or maybe time trials.) They are purpose built for riding alone and being as aero as possible, while saving certain muscle groups for the subsequent run phase of a tri.

You can google various comparison articles. Here's one of the first ones I found:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/112808-difference-between-triathlon-road/

dasgeh
02-09-2012, 02:25 PM
I don't think you want a Tri-specific bike unless you intend to do triathlons (or maybe time trials.) They are purpose built for riding alone and being as aero as possible, while saving certain muscle groups for the subsequent run phase of a tri.

I believe most people also find the fit to be less comfortable than a road bike (at least until you get used to it). Again, depends a lot on what you intend to do with the bike. If you're thinking of doing tris, great. If you're thinking of doing tris and commuting / touring around for long rides on the weekends, you may be happier with a road bike. You can get a pretty good aero position on most road bikes.

KS1G
02-09-2012, 02:43 PM
One more vote to make sure whatever you decide to buy fits you before buying anything. I am helping a friend buy her 1st road bike (has a hybrid and is ready to make the move up). Over several visits to different shops, she has figured out she prefers woman-specific geometry, her frame size (which varies with make), top tube length preference (10mm makes a huge difference), likes SRAM action but preferes feel Shimano brifter hoods (going to have to pick one or the other), and prefers carbon to Al/carbon mix. And narrowed it down to 2 shops and 2-3 bikes. She'd be unhappy and have wasted a lot of money if she'd gone out and bought what she initially thought she wanted, and be wondering if she'd gotten the best deal for the right bike if she bought what she saw at the 1st shop (although that is one of the bikes she's considering, so it'd have been a good choice).

QuantFail
02-09-2012, 03:10 PM
Well I just came back from visiting two LBSs.

I found a Felt Z6, everything Carbon except for the Handle bar, so Frame, Fork and seatpost were Carbon. Then the next LBS had a Cavalo Calabrese, which is a bike made by Nashbar which is the same as Fuji I think, same frame the salesperson told me, was Carbon everything (Frame, Fork, Seatpost and Bar). Both of these bikes are for 1200. The Felt was a 2010 and the Cavalo was a 2011. They struck me as more bike for my buck than the others. The Cavalo had SRAM components and the Felt has 105s. So I guess it's a toss.

Greenbelt
02-10-2012, 08:50 AM
I'd say the clearances built in for mud and gunk have something to do with it, although I've never examined that variable between a dedicated touring bike and a cross bike. Racy cross bikes will have shorter stays, but I find most have a little longer wheelbase and a little slacker front end geometry than your typical road bike. Both traits common to tourers as well. Eyelets can also be found on most low-mid range cross bikes since so many of us (myself included) are using them as commuters.

Lines are blurring everywhere!

Saw this last night: disk brake equipped cross bike with narrow-ish CX tires (more for harder track than pure mud I think). Long-distance commuter bike of the future, I think. I was drooling.
752

DaveK
02-10-2012, 09:42 AM
Saw this last night: disk brake equipped cross bike with narrow-ish CX tires (more for harder track than pure mud I think). Long-distance commuter bike of the future, I think. I was drooling.
752

I'm currently drooling over the Raleigh Furley (SSCX with discs) I saw at Revolution - http://www.raleighusa.com/bikes/steel-road/furley-12/

...or the sweet, sweet Kona I saw at BicycleSpace last weekend - http://www.konaworld.com/road.cfm?content=honky_inc

WillStewart
02-10-2012, 10:23 AM
If you are shifting from "up on the bars" with your hybrid to a "down on the drops" position, you may want to consider how that might feel on your back, neck, shoulders, wrists, etc for the duration of your commute.

Greenbelt
02-10-2012, 11:13 AM
I'm currently drooling over the Raleigh Furley (SSCX with discs) I saw at Revolution - http://www.raleighusa.com/bikes/steel-road/furley-12/

...or the sweet, sweet Kona I saw at BicycleSpace last weekend - http://www.konaworld.com/road.cfm?content=honky_inc

I looked at the Honky Inc, but went with the Jamis BosaNova instead (a better price on the disk-equipped steel bike, although I discarded the silly stock fenders, went with bigger tires, and eventually upgraded the brakes). The Jamis just seemed to fit me perfect, and I can ride it for hours without any pressure points or discomfort. Their new cross bike is going to be a competitor though for commuters I think -- I can't wait to ride one. It's a quite a bit lighter, but I'll have see how comfy it is on the road.

dasgeh
02-10-2012, 02:21 PM
Well I just came back from visiting two LBSs.

Hope it was fun! I have a Felt (ZW25, I think) and I LOVE it. Mainly because of fit, but I commute on it everyday and have done a few tris on it. I've had it for 3 years. Love it.

CCrew
02-10-2012, 03:00 PM
If you are shifting from "up on the bars" with your hybrid to a "down on the drops" position, you may want to consider how that might feel on your back, neck, shoulders, wrists, etc for the duration of your commute.

For the most part that transition is positive, as you have much more in the way of options with drops on hand and body positioning than you do in pretty much a fixed position on a hybrid

WillStewart
02-10-2012, 03:25 PM
For the most part that transition is positive, as you have much more in the way of options with drops on hand and body positioning than you do in pretty much a fixed position on a hybrid

True, but the hybrid position is relatively comfortable in all the areas I stated, and hands on the drops can introduce neck, back, shoulder, wrist, etc discomfort and/or pain.

DismalScientist
02-10-2012, 03:32 PM
True, but the hybrid position is relatively comfortable in all the areas I stated, and hands on the drops can introduce neck, back, shoulder, wrist, etc discomfort and/or pain.

Perhaps you can raise your stem or move your seat forward relative to the bars. Use gloves for wrist issues.
Normally you don't shift from the drops, but rather from the hoods.

(Or from the downtube, as God intended...)

creadinger
02-10-2012, 03:39 PM
(Or from the downtube, as God intended...)

Because the last time bikes were made with downtube shifters was during creation.

DismalScientist
02-10-2012, 03:42 PM
If you want upright bars on a road bike, that can be done: http://bikesnobnyc.blogspot.com/2009/01/more-things-changepart-ii-true.html

(Thanks to Tim Kelly for the link.)