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jrenaut
12-29-2011, 12:59 PM
If I want to get a computer, what should I consider?

I like the idea of wireless, but I hate the idea of constantly adjusting some sensor zip-tied to my fork. I think I only want speed, trip counter, and odometer, but full GPS would be kind of cool, too. It needs to come off quickly so I can continue to lock the bike up in random places throughout the city without having to worry about it walking away.

jabberwocky
12-29-2011, 01:25 PM
How much are you thinking of spending?

Before I got my Garmin (early 2007), I used to run Planet Bike Protoge computers. They were cheap wired ones; inexpensive enough that I had one on each bike and didn't sweat it too much when one got broken or lost.

Since then I've been running Garmin Edges (a 305 until I got my 800 earlier this year). They are worlds better and easy to transfer between bikes, but obviously more expensive. Downloading rides to the computer is very nice and much more sophisticated; its cool to see how many times you've ridden a particular route, what your average speed was, etc.

vvill
12-29-2011, 01:37 PM
If I had the green light to get a new one right now I'd get one of the Garmin Edge models. I currently have basic wired Cateye computers with cadence, supplemented with a car GPS in my pocket set up in "bike mode" (can't really tell if this does anything - it's still not terribly accurate). The car GPS battery also only lasts a few hours. I had a USB backup battery that let me actually log my first century using the car GPS but I've since misplaced the battery.

Before that I owned wired Cateye and Sigma Sport computers without cadence. I used to think those were fancy!

jrenaut
12-29-2011, 02:56 PM
Not sure what I want to spend - probably looking in the $50-75 range unless I totally fall in love with something more expensive. I use my phone GPS to map rides sometimes, though that's the thing that told me I was biking in Rock Creek, and that I hit 53mph on Hains Point.

WillStewart
12-29-2011, 03:12 PM
I use my phone GPS to map rides sometimes, though that's the thing that told me I was biking in Rock Creek, and that I hit 53mph on Hains Point.

Do you have an Android with ant+ or iPhone?

Speed and cadence sensor compatible with any ANT+ receiving device:
- http://www.wahoofitness.com/Products/Wahoo-Fitness-Premium-Speed-and-Cadence-Bike-Sensor.asp

Speed, instant acceleration, cadence and surface grade (and heart rate with additional chest strap):
- http://velocomputer.com/views/products.jsp

I have not tried either of these.

jrenaut
12-29-2011, 03:45 PM
Don't know what ant+ is, but I have a Droid 3. Going to Google it now . . .

americancyclo
12-30-2011, 07:48 AM
Don't know what ant+ is, but I have a Droid 3. Going to Google it now . . .

I think it's only on the Sony phones and the HTC Rhyme at the moment.


I think I only want speed, trip counter, and odometer,

PM me if you want my Cateye Mity 8 (http://www2.cateye.com/en/product_detail/255) it's super old school, and wired, and a bit weathered, but the display is clear, it works very reliably, and it's free. If not, no big deal.

justasaintz
12-30-2011, 01:07 PM
I used to have a Incite 6i by Trek and then a Cateye Strada, the later one tells the cadence as well, but both were pretty basic and wired. Never gave any trouble. Now, I use a Garmin 700/750 with GPS, but till now I still haven't used it to its fullest potential.

Also, another thing you need to worry with the latest GPS enabled devices is that you need to make sure you charge them all the time. Else they are of no use.
I honestly miss my old wired simple models coz I'm terrible at remembering to charge my GPS.

But, as jabberwacky mentioned, its easy to transfer between bikes. all you need is the bike censors which are considerably cheaper relative to the unit itself, the unit itself can be used on both bikes or as many as you use!

acc
12-30-2011, 05:18 PM
I love my Garmin almost more than my children after two snow days. You will not regret it. It tells you everything. Speed, route, heart rate, cadence, miles. It can predict the future too.

ann

ronwalf
12-31-2011, 09:00 AM
I used a Garmin Forerunner 205 for years until the seal failed and I messed up the repair job. I just picked up a refurb Edge 500 (same warranty as new), picked up the heart-rate monitor and cadence sensor separately, and still came in under what they were charging for a new unit alone (all off Amazon). If I didn't care about the sensors or the barometric altimeter, I'd get the Edge 200 (~$150).

It's interesting what behavior a computer does and doesn't encourage (for me, anyway). In the year and a half without a computer, I kept track of my distance and average speed just fine with an online journal (RunKeeper, in this case) and a stop watch (subsequently died, function replaced by dumb-phone). I watched general trends, seeing how my speed is affected by sleep, wind and temperature. With the GPS, I played coverage games around the neighborhood, seeing what streets I could hit on my commute through the week. The more varied routes make it harder to directly compare performance.

consularrider
12-31-2011, 05:31 PM
I've been using a Garmin Edge 500 for the past 16 months. It is easy to mount and remove from the bike in a couple of seconds. You can usually find sales on the basic model for under $200 and the cadence and heart rate bundle for around $250. I don't have any trouble remembering to charge it because I download every evening (just don't forget to eventually delete the rides from the device or its reaction time slows way down on startup). The charge was more than good enough for a 12 hour ride (my longest so far). This model does not have map function (until you download it after the ride).

Before that I had inexpensive wired and wireless (Vetta, Cateye and dB4LW), none costing over $50. For these you can get models that you can set up for two bikes if you get an extra mounting and sensor. I switched back to a wired model because I was getting too much interference on the wireless (neon signs, some traffic lights, something near the 4 Mile Run water treatment plant, etc). It was particularly amusing to come out of a restaurant one day and find that I had ridden 50 miles while I ate breakfast with a maximum speed of 74 MPH. That taught me not to pack the bike near a neon sign.

DaveK
01-03-2012, 09:17 AM
As long as you're sure you won't want the heart rate, power, and cadence capabilities then the Edge 200 is ideal for you.

I have a Cateye Astrale 8 computer that's been on about 12 bikes at this point, functions flawlessly, and hasn't needed a battery replacement in 5 years. It requires running wires to the cadence and speed sensors, but they will always read correctly and you still get your metrics while riding on a trainer since both read from the rear wheel.

When I buy another computer it'll be an Edge 500, but right now I use my clunky FR305 for everything. Nothing wrong with it other than the size and the attachment method to the bike leaves something to be desired.

Tim Kelley
01-04-2012, 10:46 AM
Garmin has a great lineup. The 500 is an awesome GPS based cycling-only computer, with the 200 stripping out some of the fancier features.

If you ever feel like running with GPS, the 305, 310 and 910 are all great watches and the 305 is one of the best watches out there in terms of value vs. price. The 310 incorporates ANT+ for power meters and other sensors and the 910 can even track indoor swimming, if you're so inclined.

If you are feeling spendy, check out the 800 for turn by turn directions!

jrenaut
01-15-2012, 01:13 PM
http://farm8.staticflickr.com/7150/6702750047_828da46550.jpg (http://www.flickr.com/photos/thetejon/6702750047/)
New toy (http://www.flickr.com/photos/thetejon/6702750047/) by thetejon (http://www.flickr.com/people/thetejon/), on Flickr

I'm about to go for a quick ride and see how it works.

SteveTheTech
02-06-2012, 09:51 PM
First of, sorry for bumping an old solved thread but this is quite relevant to my interests. I've been researching these for a little while now. What I was looking for is similar but slightly different after reading I wanted to add a bit for others reading this, and went with the Garmin.

I ended up going entry model HRM with the ANT+ system and Garmin connect. Both of which are awesome features and some of the simplest software I've come across. My needs in a device were a trackable heart rate monitor with some expandability. From Amazon I got a bundle with the ANT+ stick, a footpod and device for a hundred bucks(seen here (http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_ss_i_0_4?url=search-alias%3Dsporting&field-keywords=fr60&x=0&y=0&sprefix=fr60%2Csporting%2C212)). I plan to add a the cadence monitor shortly, but the graphs look pretty cool and the batteries are all the same and user replaceable.

For GPS tracking I've got something really interesting. seen here (http://www.mainnav.com/product/mg-600.html)
I bought this last year since the battery in my cell dies before the end of most rides which is something I do not care for being two or three dozen miles from the car. It uses gps (no sensors) to track speed and distance and produces a KML file that works in Google Maps.

I plan on getting a Garmin 610 next anyone have any experience with this?

off2ride
02-06-2012, 10:14 PM
Garmin 800 is what I use. To this day, my wife doesn't know about the price of that thing. Shhhh. It was the "bundle" purchase and It's still a "bundle" of joy using it. So Garmin is what I recommend.

JimF22003
02-07-2012, 06:08 AM
Garmin 800 is what I use. To this day, my wife doesn't know about the price of that thing. Shhhh. It was the "bundle" purchase and It's still a "bundle" of joy using it. So Garmin is what I recommend.

I have had a 705 for the last couple of years, but it bounced off my bike somewhere on the Custis Trail a month or so ago. I bought the 800 as a replacement. I like the display better, and having the temperature gauge. The touchscreen works OK even with fairly thick gloves. The attachment mechanism is MUCH better. Hopefully this one won't bounce off into the weeds.

The only disappointment is that when i'm going up a REALLY steep grade, really slowly (like 16% at ~3 mph) the %grade reading stops working. It's probably not very accurate under those situations anyway, but still I want to know how tough I am (or why i can justify riding so slowly) :)

americancyclo
02-07-2012, 07:11 AM
I have had a 705 for the last couple of years, but it bounced off my bike somewhere on the Custis Trail a month or so ago.

Are you saying I can go hunting for a used 705 in the weeds somewhere?

rcannon100
02-07-2012, 07:41 AM
I got a GARMIN Oregon 550 for Geocaching. Includes a camera. Nice touch interface. Has a trip screen, with 6 different stats, that you can set any way you want to. Average speed. Current speed. Time in motion. Time stopped. Max speed. Total Time. Distance until destination. Distance traveled so far. On and on. Set the one's you like. It's sweet.

Okay, so here is the important part. I went hiking this winter with the Oregon, with my dogs. Came back to the car, put the dogs in the car (left the Oregon on the roof). As I drove down the hwy, I heard a clunk clunk clunk. I knew what that was. Did a U turn, came back to the scene of the crime. There it was - it had gone skipping across the asphalt - had some good gashes - but it was still working.

This is an excellent all around GPS. It has a mount for a handlebar that works decent enough - its not small like some of the others that people are talking about - it is a hand held. But its sweet and if your are touring, you might enjoy seeing the map of the course that you are going on.

https://buy.garmin.com/shop/shop.do?pID=26875

726

americancyclo
02-07-2012, 10:07 AM
I plan on getting a Garmin 610 next anyone have any experience with this?

I didn't find out about DCRainmaker until mid last year, but he has the MOST comprehensive reviews of any products I've seen. He has tons of info on the garmin line of products, and has this to say at the end of his review of the 610:

4) The Cyclist: You want the Edge series of devices, check out the (http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2011/04/garmin-forerunner-610-in-depth-review.html)Edge 500 (http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2009/11/garmin-edge-500-in-depth-review.html) – it’s the best bet here. If you want a crossover device, than go with the FR310XT. While the FR610 does have cycling functions – its twice the price of the Edge 500. Compared to the FR310XT, it’s the same price. The FR310XT has more cycling functions than the FR610. (http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2011/04/garmin-forerunner-610-in-depth-review.html)

But go read the full review.

jabberwocky
02-07-2012, 10:16 AM
I plan on getting a Garmin 610 next anyone have any experience with this?I have one for running. Its a great running computer, but I wouldn't get one for cycling. One of the Edges (500 or 800) would be a much better bet.

JimF22003
02-07-2012, 10:27 AM
Are you saying I can go hunting for a used 705 in the weeds somewhere?

If you find it, it's yours :)

SteveTheTech
02-07-2012, 09:49 PM
Garmin seems to be the dominate over here huh ?
I can see why

The DC Rainmaker site would have seriously complicated my decision making...over the top reviews are awesome.

I was looking at the 610 for triathlon training so the touchscreen and multisport support is ideal in that case. Although I do really like their bike specific models and would not kick one of those off my handlebars. :)

bluerider
02-09-2012, 07:36 AM
I just got a Garmin Edge 200. Its basic but it does everything I want.

culimerc
02-09-2012, 08:12 AM
I went with the Garmin 800 for the navigation features. I really am not fond of having to pull out cue sheets and trying to read them while speeding down a hill, or in the pouring rain, or trying to figure out where you are 5 miles after you missed a turn. The nav feature on the 800 lets me pull routes from a bunch of different on-line resources and just head by myself anywhere. Little pricey, but really nice if you can swing it.

americancyclo
02-09-2012, 08:48 AM
If anyone is thinking about getting a Garmin Edge, the Open Street Maps (http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Main_Page) are fantastic, and it's free to download (http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/OSM_Map_On_Garmin/Download), as opposed to Garmin maps which run around $100.

DaveK
02-09-2012, 08:58 AM
If anyone is thinking about getting a Garmin Edge, the Open Street Maps (http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Main_Page) are fantastic, and it's free to download (http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/OSM_Map_On_Garmin/Download), as opposed to Garmin maps which run around $100.

Hmm... it doesn't say, can I use these to update the Garmin in my car? I've previously found slightly less legal ways of updating it.

jabberwocky
02-09-2012, 08:58 AM
If anyone is thinking about getting a Garmin Edge, the Open Street Maps (http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Main_Page) are fantastic, and it's free to download (http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/OSM_Map_On_Garmin/Download), as opposed to Garmin maps which run around $100.++

The OSM maps are better than the Garmin ones, too. Much more comprehensive.

eminva
05-25-2012, 09:42 AM
Hello --

I read all the comments in this thread and very much appreciate everyone's input. To go along with my new bike, I am thinking of upgrading from Cyclemeter on my iPhone ($5 app) to a dedicated device (Garmin, probably a 500).

My question is, do you all ever have any doubts about its accuracy? I find the mileage on Cyclemeter can be off by an unacceptable margin of error (for example, this morning it exaggerated my 14 mile commute to 15.8 miles). I repeatedly go through all the trouble shooting steps recommended online, but that gets tiresome when it is an every-couple-of-days process.

I just want to make sure my problems are limited to my particular device/app and not inherent in GPS based navigation itself (before spending all that money).

Thanks!

Liz

Dirt
05-25-2012, 10:20 AM
Mileage has always been rock solid on my Garmin. Sometimes the elevation profile gets a little tweaky. I've never had a problem with the overall mileage. I'm pretty sure that cycling would be a bit less fun if I didn't have my Garmin Edge 800. I use it daily for guiding and recording rides.

jabberwocky
05-25-2012, 10:41 AM
No issues with either of my Garmins (Edge 305 from 2007 till 2010, then Edge 800 from then to now). My mileage on my commutes has always been extremely consistent.

americancyclo
05-25-2012, 10:58 AM
I've never used cyclemeter, but I have used the following apps for my Android Phone (most recent last):
Sportypal - bleh, pretty lousy support team
Runkeeper - ok
MapMyRide - too many ads on page
Strava - BEST!
Endomondo - using mostly for National Bike Challenge. Has nice "10 sec countdown" feature.

Never really had GPS issues with them that I can recall. sometimes the data interpretation wasn't so spot on, but that was cleaned up by the software folks. I also got some funk data once in a while riding on K/Water St. under the Whitehurst freeway, which I am assuming was due to some weird bouncing of the GPS signal off the metal structure.

My Garmin Edge 705 has held up really well with GPS over the past six months, although sometimes it takes a bit longer to acquire a signal than the phones, since it relies on true GPS and not AGPS (cellular assisted location detection) like the phones. I do have elevation issues sometimes, but to correct that, you can input elevation way point that the Garmin will detect and adjust accordingly as long as you begin the ride within 30 meters of that point.

Also, just saw this on DCRainmaker.com (http://www.dcrainmaker.com/):
(Quick Heads Up: REI has the Garmin FR610 (http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2011/04/garmin-forerunner-610-in-depth-review.html) down to $299 (http://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&mi=10248&pw=37531&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.rei.com%2Fproduct%2F816864%2F garmin-forerunner-610-gps-heart-rate-monitor%3FsiteId%3DcjIsd2x-it3792%26URL%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.rei.com%252F product%252F816864%252Fgarmin-forerunner-610-gps-heart-rate-monitor%26PID%3D4485850%26AID%3D10456937%26cm_mmc% 3DCJ-_-Aff-_-4485850-_-10456937) (with the heart rate strap, usually $399) on some sort of temporary sale. Thanks to all that sent this in. And, that particular REI link helps out the site as well. You have to add it to your cart to see the cheaper price.)

If you haven't read up on your shortlist of devices there, I'd highly recommend his reviews.

Let us know what you decide!

vvill
05-25-2012, 11:50 AM
I have a Garmin 500 with cadence sensor/HRM and I have to say it's been my best bike-related purchase for a while. I enjoy having the ride data a LOT and it's motivating and rewarding. There are things I don't like about how the device works but the overall utility far outweighs those niggles.

I was actually running it in parallel with a Cateye wired cyclemeter (I think an Astrale 8) for months and compared mileages every trip for a while. The Garmin would always be slightly less because it records based on GPS/hitting start (not exactly sure how) as opposed to a wheel magnet but the difference could usually be expressed as a small fraction of a mile. The longer your ride, the less significant that difference. IMO it's not significant enough to worry about. Ideally you have to make sure it finds the GPS satellite location before you start riding.

I have heard if you run a cadence / speed sensor with the 500 it is more accurate than pure GPS mileage (can't verify this because both my main bikes have the sensor).

The only time the 500 let me down was a solo ride in NC (http://app.strava.com/rides/8258663) when I put in a course to follow and at some point the device froze, and I didn't realize, so I rode maybe 3-5 miles before realizing that happened, and I ended up missing a turn. You can see the straight line in the map where the Garmin was frozen.

rcannon100
05-25-2012, 11:55 AM
I am an old geocacher. I have a Garmin 550. Its big. Not a bike GPS. BUT!!!! It has a full, lit, color screen. If you are going touring, you can have a map, you can have your route, you can have mileposts, and points of interest. The screen is fully customizable. One screen can be the map, another screen has 6 statistics - any statistics. Current speed. Average speed. Max speed. Distance traveled. Time traveled. Distance until arrival. Elevation. Flight patter of an African Swallow. Its great.

It took this thing on a C&O trip. There is a handle bar attachment. It was great! Showed where we were, where we were going, how long till we got there. I just loved it.

You create and download all your trip route data. Many people before you have already created it. You can also buy and install maps. Just like a car GPS, you can have a GPS on your handlebar giving you directions.

Final plug. I am an idiot. After hiking at Occoquan, I left the garmin on my roof. Reaching 45 mph, I heard clunk clunk clunk. I knew what that was. Did a U turn, found the GPS in the middle of the road --- and it is working fine!

This is not a tiny cyclists GPS; but if you like going on long rides and want a map, its great.

consularrider
05-25-2012, 02:09 PM
I've been using my Garmin Edge 500 for almost two years now and prefer it over my old wired/wireless bike computers. Of course, I spent a whole bunch more for it. I really like that I can use the same device for each of my bikes without a lot of fuss. The milage seems to be spot on for every ride, but while the elevations are generally within the same ball park, they can also vary quite a bit. It doesn't seem to get my starting elevation right every time. Also, if I take it inside, or turn it off during a stop on a ride, the elevation seems to jump up. I haven't spent any time researching the fixes for this.

americancyclo
05-25-2012, 02:32 PM
You can also buy and install maps. Just like a car GPS, you can have a GPS on your handlebar giving you directions.


For any of the garmin devices that display maps with an SD Card slot you can download a basemap from Open Street Maps for Garmin (http://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/OSM_Map_On_Garmin/Download) for FREE. This works great on my Edge 705, and I even downloaded the map of Bermuda for a recent vacation. It was really nice being able to look at the street map while on the bus to know how close we were to the beach, and to verify that we were going the right direction.

jabberwocky
05-25-2012, 02:50 PM
Also, if I take it inside, or turn it off during a stop on a ride, the elevation seems to jump up. I haven't spent any time researching the fixes for this.My guess is that, since the 500 has a barometric altimeter, the GPS signal is used to get a starting elevation and then the barometric is used for relative changes for the duration of the ride (since the barometric is more accurate for relative changes than consumer GPS receivers are). If you turn it off and turn it back on (or take it inside where it loses signal), it recalibrates its absolute elevation again.

I've definitely found absolute GPS elevation to be a bit spotty. Outside my townhouse (actual elevation ~400 feet above sea level), it will calibrate to anything from -50 to 550 at the start of a ride. With the barometric altimeter though, it does tend to get relative elevation reasonably consistent (meaning that while it may say the foot of a hill is anywhere from 100 feet to 500 feet above sea level on different rides, it will still have the height of the hill as right around 200 feet each time). I've found that riding over the same route several times, elevation change will vary 10-15% or so. Which is acceptable for my purposes. And distance varies very little (less than 1%).

vvill
05-25-2012, 03:33 PM
For elevation: since it is based on barometric pressure, it's sensitive to temperature changes. I *think* (based on anecdotal evidence) if it gets warmer as you ride it will underestimate the gain, and if it gets cooler, it will overestimate... someone else can consult Boyle's Law... in any case, this could also explain why if you stop for a while your elevation will change - it is unlikely that the air pressure will stay constant while you are stopped.

The temperature sensor on the 500 also consistently overestimates the temperature in my experience.


I have an elevation point set near my house to try to get the elevation correct but I still end up with negative elevations a lot.

ronwalf
05-25-2012, 03:37 PM
Outside my townhouse (actual elevation ~400 feet above sea level), it will calibrate to anything from -50 to 550 at the start of a ride.
You can save a number of known elevation points (~10 IIRC). I just have two locations set (home and work). The downside is that it only calibrates against the new location at the start of an activity (you have to start within 30 meters or so of a saved location).

Certifried
05-25-2012, 04:23 PM
Awesome thread. I wish I had all of this info before I spent the foolish money I did on a bontrager node. The thing is practically useless, and doesn't even connect with my sensors 1/2 the time. If it does, it usually ends up losing it 1/2 thru the ride. I tried to use Runkeeper on my Galaxy Nexus for a while, but the phone is such crap that's unreliable too. I ended up taking a hint from someone on Runkeeper who uses and old Droid Incredible (super solid GPS, never loses signal). I use my old D-Inc which still tracks the GPS even though it's "disabled" on my Verizon account, then I wi-fi up my results when I get home. This doesn't give me any advanced features (cadence, directions if I'm lost, etc), so all the info here will be great when I finally decide that I need a Garmin.

americancyclo
05-28-2012, 10:14 AM
For those that use your phones, there are a few ANT+ enabled phones on the market (and more coming, I think). They will hook up to a Heart Rate Monitor and Speed/Cadence sensor.

Android: http://www.thisisant.com/pages/developer-zone/android-api

i (http://www.thisisant.com/pages/developer-zone/android-api)Phone has the wahoo fitness ANT+ sensor for under $100.

Maybe good options for those that don't want to shell out for a dedicated device, but personally, I love having all the realtime info plus navigation capability on my 705. Someday when that one eats it, I'll spring for an 800, but by then, I'm sure Garmin will have released the 900.

rcannon100
01-15-2013, 09:04 PM
Old thread - revised question. I had an Oregon. I loved my Garmin Oregon (for geocaching and whatever). But it has gone to the great unknown. It took its last ride in last Sunday's fog.

I would like a device I can use for Cycling and Hiking - where I am looking for simple things like distance, average speed, time and Strava connect. I am thinking of getting a Forerunner - like the 410 - as a one device that does both. And the Forerunner 410 seems to be on sale. Its almost the same price as the 200s.

Does this make sense - or do I have to get a GPS for every damn activity I do?

TwoWheelsDC
01-15-2013, 09:23 PM
The Edge series work fine for tracking your hikes/walks and such, at least the few times I've used mine for that purpose, but I'm not sure if the Forerunners are somehow "optimized" for slower speeds or whatever. If that was the case, the Forerunner might be the better option. Like I said, the Edge series works fine for hiking, and it can give you rudimentary route guidance (key word is rudimentary), which may or may not be a desirable feature for you...I think it's very helpful, at least for cycling.

jabberwocky
01-16-2013, 07:09 AM
I think the main difference is form factor. The watch-style ones are more portable, but have smaller screens that display less info. The Edges (bike ones) have larger screens, but aren't as easy to use running or walking. I've used my edge 800 for running; it works, but you need to be careful how you hold it (wrapping your hand around it seems to cause it to drop satellite connections sometimes).

For basic tracking, pretty much anything will work fine.

Tim Kelley
01-16-2013, 07:38 AM
Does the 410 have a cycling mode? If not, instead of MPH, you'll be getting min/mi as your pacing on the bike.

The 305 if you can find one, or the 310 do both biking and running/hiking well for pretty cheap.

Some reading for you. These article are a bit older, but much of the info is still relevant:

http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2010/08/my-2010-athletic-gps-device.html

http://www.dcrainmaker.com/2011/11/my-2011-sports-technology.html

rcannon100
01-16-2013, 08:03 AM
The Edge series work fine for tracking your hikes/walks and such,

Good answer but dumb question. I get an Edge for cycling... and then I use it for hikes.... how do I "mount" it. With my Oregon, it came with a clip; I would clip it to my backpack. I dont want to hold it in my hand. How do you carry it?

That's a good answer. I definitely could see getting the device optimized for cycling... that will also measure my hikes.

Afterthought: I guess I could take a bike mount, and just retrofit it into anything I want it to be - particular through the use of velcro.

Steve
01-16-2013, 08:09 AM
fyi, and perhaps this belongs in the good deal thread, but Revolutions tweeted this last night:

Save 50% on Garmin Edge 705 computers. We don't have many left, but you can get a spectacular cycling computer at an outrageous price.

Tim Kelley
01-16-2013, 08:46 AM
Good answer but dumb question. I get an Edge for cycling... and then I use it for hikes.... how do I "mount" it. With my Oregon, it came with a clip; I would clip it to my backpack. I dont want to hold it in my hand. How do you carry it?

That's a good answer. I definitely could see getting the device optimized for cycling... that will also measure my hikes.

Afterthought: I guess I could take a bike mount, and just retrofit it into anything I want it to be - particular through the use of velcro.


The 305, 310 and 910 have a wrist mount. The 500, 800, and 810 share the same mount, but are considerably bulkier to wear on your arm.

You could always just put it in a coat pocket or side pocket on the backpack.

vvill
01-16-2013, 12:10 PM
Does this make sense - or do I have to get a GPS for every damn activity I do?

I use my Edge 500 for running/walking/whatever as well as cycling. Before that I was able to use a vehicle GPS in my jersey's back pocket for tracking my rides (some Garmin nuvi model); it worked too although it didn't seem as granular/sensitive on the data.

The Edge mounts have little grooves for elastic bands so you can definitely fashion something out of that. I usually just carry it in my hand or slip it into a pocket when I'm running.