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jrenaut
10-14-2011, 08:25 AM
Since it appears that the DC Area has entered a new Wet Age, from which we may never emerge, it seems appropriate to talk about rain gear. In the warm months I'm fine getting drenched in my normal shorts and wicking t-shirt, but when it starts getting cold that's not going to be cool.

What do people recommend? I'd like really lightweight stuff so that I can use it in a lot of weather - I figure I can regulate temperature with layers underneath, I just need something to keep me dry.

And general winter clothing recommendations are good, too - I was CaBi commuting last winter, so I didn't have to worry about my pants catching. Which means I have no long pants I can wear with my road bike without a lot of taping and whatnot.

Greenbelt
10-14-2011, 08:42 AM
It's expensive, but I'm a big fan of the Gore Windstopper membrane/panels. It's not totally waterproof, but good enough for winter, when it's usually not raining that hard. Very breathable, which is key. I picked up a nice jacket on sale at REI a while back in a stylish lemon yellow color. Fits snug, so no parachuting.

I can't wear truly water proof jacket -- just not breathable enough, even Gore-Tex. I overheat/oversweat even on the coldest days. Just go with lots of layers instead and the Windstopper on top if it's really bad out. I do have a pair of Gore-Tex wind pants, which I wear when it's really cold with stretch pants underneath. The wind pants can catch on the gears, so you either need an ankle reflector bracelet or just keep the chain on the big front chainwheel all the time.

CCrew
10-14-2011, 10:51 AM
About the best true waterproof cycling jackets are made by ShowersPass http://www.showerspass.com/

Not cheap.

jrenaut
10-14-2011, 10:56 AM
Not cheap is okay - if it works and lasts, it's cheap in the long run.

DaveK
10-14-2011, 11:08 AM
I wear a light rain jacket over whatever I'm normally wearing and ride slow. I have this one - http://shop.pearlizumi.com/product.php?mode=view&product_id=1575779&outlet= - it's light and small enough to be rolled up in my pannier 95% of the time without noticing it's there.

dbb
10-14-2011, 11:28 AM
I second the Showers Pass. I rode all last winter with one and it kept me dry on the wet days and cut the wind on the cold days. A couple of layers of warm stuff underneath it and I stayed warm. REI sells them.

jrenaut
10-14-2011, 11:46 AM
I really like the look of the Showers Pass pants on their website. Have any of you used the pants, or just the jackets?

Dirt
10-14-2011, 11:49 AM
I guess I'll weigh in. I obviously have an opinion or 9 on the topic.

The best rain gear without question is not for you, but for your bike. Fenders. Unless you're riding through rain like we had last night (which I rather enjoyed) most of stuff that gets you wet comes from below, not above.

Rain Jackets: I own 3 great ones and 1 good one and a few really horrible ones. For me I've found that rain jackets are useless when the temps are over 65 degrees. If it is a real rain jacket, I generate more sweat if it is warm-ish outside than the jacket is able to wick (release). I end up just as, if not more wet than had I just worn a vest.

Jackets that I love:

Showers Pass Elite. Expensive, pretty much bomb-proof and pretty well ventilated.
Rapha rain jacket: Insanely expensive. Best rain jacket I've ever seen. Other than price (around $300) it is flawless.... although my friend Kevin discovered that they're not fire proof. Expensive mistake.
Pearl Izumi Elite Barrier: New kid on the block. It is light, wicks pretty well and SERIOUSLY waterproof. Pretty reasonably priced too. I got mine on sale for $120. The hood is probably useless.
Endura Flyte: Awesome jacket starting out. Pretty expensive (I think I got it for about $220) and SERIOUSLY waterproof to start out. The waterproofing almost completely failed after 3 or 4 washings though. I washed according to directions and it still failed. I've treated it with XC ski jacket wash and treatment designed for high tech, membrane jackets like this and that has revived it a bit. Endura support has not helped with any kind of suggestion for how to care for their clothes so as to keep them waterproof. I will not buy, nor recommend any of their rain gear even though they start out perfect.



Lots of companies make great jackets for cycling. Gore is the one that comes to mind. My Gore Windstopper jacket works pretty well in the rain. Very well made too.

Vests: If it is in the low 60s or higher, I leave the jacket at home. As I said above, any water that they keep off me is replaced by me sweating through. I've got 3 vests that I love. Endura makes a great windstopper vest that works well for me in the rain. Keeps my core warm and happy even if I get a bit wet. I think it cost me about $80. My Campagnolo softshell vest keeps light storms out and keeps me super cozy and well ventilated even if I do get wet. It is a little pricy, but you get what you pay for. I paid around $200, but have gotten 3 hard seasons of riding with it and it shows no signs of wear or mortality. My Rapha stow-away vest is insanely over the top. It weighs NOTHING, keeps light rain and mist out nicely and vents perfectly. It also weighs nothing. It also costs $200.

Gloves: Nothing is going to keep your hands dry in a real rain. Moose Mitts and Bar Mitts are good when it is cold. Even they tend to send rain down your arms into your gloves and onto your hands. Do not despair!!!! Our scuba diving brethren and sistren have the answer. Castelli makes a glove called the Diluvio (Google will find them) that are made of neoprene. Your hands still get wet, but they stay warm. The palms are kinda weird, but they grip the bars really well. Trust me, these things rock. Warm and wet is better than Cold and wet any day... especially when Warm and dry isn't an option.

Bottoms: Generally I find rain pants useless. I've used some of the best designed pants and they all totally fail to do anything but make my legs below the knees feel all oggie. Rain knickers, on the other hand, are wonderful. I have 2 pairs of lovely and expensive rain pants (CAnari and Showers Pass) that have been redeemed at the hands of my very sharp sewing scissors and a little time with a sewing machine. I also have a set of Endura rain knickers that, though not as waterproof as they once were, work reasonably well.

Legs: What do I do with my exposed legs? Depends on how cold it is. If it is above 55 degrees, I do nothing. I'm not made of sugar. I'm not gonna melt. 35-55 degrees I will embrocate. At the top end of that spectrum, a dollop of Bag Balm or petroleum jelly rubbed into each shin and calf keeps the water off and even helps with a little warmth. If it is cold-ish.. Mid 40's down to about 35 and I'm going to be on the bike for a while, there are embrocations that work to keep your skin and muscles warm even in those elements. They increase blood flow and repel rain. Don't embrocate with any of those if you're just riding to the office. The warming effect lasts for hours and you'll feel kinda weird sitting at your desk with your legs extra toasty. The stuff wears off, rather than washing off. When you get into the really cold weather stuff... where you're dealing with slush and snow, I use mountaineering gators. They're part boot cover, part over-garment. They go up to just below my knees and overlap with my knickers. They work perfectly and if you size them correctly, they give a pretty good seal around your shoes too. I've done serious creek crossings with mine and not had water come in the top of my boots. Most mountaineering shops have a good selection and size. I got mine at REI about 20 years ago for $20. They're a little more expensive these days.

Helmet: If it is warm, I do nothing. My head gets wet anyways. Cooler temps might make me get out a goretex helmet cover. Sugoi, Pearl, Gore and others make great ones. My Lazer helmet has the coolest solution. They make a lexan cover that snaps over the helmet and just covers the vents. They make a clear one that looks like a normal helmet and a yellow one with the Lion of Flanders on it. I have the latter. Lazer also makes earflaps when it gets really cold. Cool company. Great helmets. Lots of people wear a cycling cap under their helmet to add a bit of warmth. If the cap is wool, it even works when wet.

What did I miss?

Glasses. Not much helps. I mentioned Cat Crap lens treatment in a different thread (google will find it). It is okay. Some friends like goggles when it gets cold. I fog all of it up. I tend to wear a hat with a visor under my helmet and tilt my head so that the rain doesn't hit directly in my eyeballs.

Shoes! Almost forgot shoes. Lake makes rain shoes. They're awesome!!!! Expensive though. I think they're around $170. I love them. Shoe covers can be had for $20-40. Showers Pass makes some REALLY Nice ones, but they're sized for going over running shoes with thick soles. I'm a size 46 (11.5 to Amerikans) and the Mediums that I got were a bit large. I strap them tight with Bike Arlington reflective gear. Lots of companies make nice neoprene ones. Pearl Izumi makes some AWESOME Ones that come with a rear flashy light built in, but they're a bit more expensive.

Socks: Wool is your friend. Seal Skinns makes waterproof socks. I tried them and they turn my shoes into sweat buckets and give me blisters bigtime. For people who sweat a bit less than I do, I've heard they work well.

Did I mention that you should put fenders on your bike?

Hugs and Kisses,

Pete

Dirt
10-14-2011, 11:53 AM
http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6169/6240095831_d0496f5207_b.jpg
Castelli neoprene gloves and the Pearl Izumi Elite Barrier jacket in action.

http://farm7.static.flickr.com/6155/6207542156_fb98a0a39c_b.jpg
Lazer Helium Helmet with the Lion of (Ned) Flanders snap-on cover. Endura Flyte jacket (now semi-retired).

Dirt
10-14-2011, 11:59 AM
As if I haven't spammed y'all enough with this.....

Care for these garments is amazingly difficult. Be very, very gentle with them. My Endura jacket is a prime example. I'm sure there's a way to clean it and preserve the waterproof nature of the jacket, but I couldn't find it and the company was no help. Our XC ski brethren and sistren have GREAT products for cleaning and re-treating waterproof clothing. Most good outdoor stores sell it. I wash my rain gear very sparingly using cold water and either by hand or in a front-load washer on the gentlest of cycles. Never get them near a real heat source. Drip dry them. If you buy an Endura jacket, wear it till it rots, unless you can get a sensical answer out of their customer support folks.

When in doubt, call the customer service line for the company that made your clothes. You might want to do that BEFORE buying. After my experience with Endura, I did and got great answers from Rapha and Pearl.

Lunch over. I need to hammer out this day.

I love you all. :D Dance between the raindrops.

Did I mention that fenders are awesome?

jrenaut
10-14-2011, 12:00 PM
One of these days I'll get a chance to try to install the fenders I got from CCrew again. If I fail this time, I will have the bike shop put them on.

As for shoe covers, I have to decide if I'm ready to take the plunge and get rid of the toe cages and get real bike shoes/pedals. I've resisted so far, but the cages kind of suck.

Dirt
10-14-2011, 12:01 PM
Oh yeah... one last thing...

There are definitely cheaper jackets out there. If you get one, make sure it has pit zips. They really make a huge difference with ventilation. The old, clear plastic jackets that the pros used to use (and some still do) work okay if you get one that is well vented. There are some high tech clear ones now that are under $100. I honestly haven't tried these yet. In theory they are breathable.

Smooch!

jrenaut
10-14-2011, 12:06 PM
Also, remember that my commute only breaks the 30 minute mark when I get a chance to go the long way, something I'm not going to be terribly inclined to do if the weather is both wet enough and cold enough for rain gear. It's only just over 3 miles, all in the city.

OneEighth
10-14-2011, 12:07 PM
You know, it's a shame, but the only thing sticking in my head after the rain gear dissertation is the image of Dirt hunched over his rain pants trying to thread a needle while the cats bat at it.

I just get wet. Wool socks, cycling cap, and coolmax technical shirts from JLRacing take the edge off even in cold weather.

jrenaut
10-14-2011, 12:09 PM
And, almost forgot - thanks, all, for the advice.

jabberwocky
10-14-2011, 12:13 PM
I have to say, I have a showerspass elite jacket and while I like the design and material, the build quality has been very poor. Many of the taped seams have delaminated and I've had to repair them myself (shoe goo and sewing machine). Their support was non-existent. I wouldn't recommend them.

Dirt
10-14-2011, 12:15 PM
I just get wet. Wool socks, cycling cap, and coolmax technical shirts from JLRacing take the edge off even in cold weather.
That's what I call the Granny Weatherwax "Faith" school of rain riding. Ride in whatever and have faith that you'll be dry someday. :D

jrenaut
10-14-2011, 12:15 PM
Dirt, is this the Pearl Izumi you're talking about (http://www.amazon.com/Pearl-Izumi-Elite-Barrier-Jacket/dp/B003BLOU5G)? If it is, sounds like a great bargain if it compares to the other two, at Amazon for less than $70.

OneEighth
10-14-2011, 12:21 PM
That's what I call the Granny Weatherwax "Faith" school of rain riding. Ride in whatever and have faith that you'll be dry someday. :D

Don't make Granny come over there with her cane.
Thank God for the cap or my hair would get all mussed up...

Dirt
10-14-2011, 12:35 PM
Dirt, is this the Pearl Izumi you're talking about (http://www.amazon.com/Pearl-Izumi-Elite-Barrier-Jacket/dp/B003BLOU5G)? If it is, sounds like a great bargain if it compares to the other two, at Amazon for less than $70.
Nope. That is the wind jacket. It is great, but not the rain jacket. They are very different.

It would appear that the deal I got was a spectacular one. This is the jacket that I got for $120. http://www.pearlizumi.com/publish/content/pi_2010/us/en/index/products/men/ride/apparel/6.-productCode-6531.html MSRP is $200.

They make a select version of it that is very similar, and cut with a little more room for $165: http://www.pearlizumi.com/publish/content/pi_2010/us/en/index/products/men/ride/apparel/6.-productCode-11131008.html

Arlingtonrider
10-14-2011, 01:01 PM
Love the scuba gloves idea! Have lots of those. Now you have me thinking about my DUI drysuit with the rock boots, lol. Since fenders won't fit on my bike . . . ;-)

eminva
10-14-2011, 01:37 PM
Wow, who knew there was so much sewing talent amongst our posters?

It is good to know I am not the only one who had to learn by trial and error. I bought an expensive rain jacket and its waterproof qualities did not stand the test of time. Apparently these products don't always live up to their advertising.

Excellent tips, Pete. I lost a glove at the end of winter last year and need a new pair and those neoprene gloves sound like they would fit the bill.

Good luck to everyone doing cycling events this weekend.

Liz

dbb
10-14-2011, 02:28 PM
I'll share some of my Army training

Say after me - I've been colder before, I'll be colder again. I've been wetter before, I'll be wetter again.

Makes you want the hot shower at home or at work even more!


That's what I call the Granny Weatherwax "Faith" school of rain riding. Ride in whatever and have faith that you'll be dry someday. :D

Arlingtonrider
10-14-2011, 03:46 PM
Or maybe . . . even . . . (dare I say it) . . . the bus or metro (just to appreciate the suffering of others, of course! ;-).


(Poking fun only at myself here!)

jrenaut
10-14-2011, 03:52 PM
As wet as I was, at least I wasn't my coworker, stuck on the red line, backed up due to a fire at Union Station, and then a girl in his packed car passed out.

I'll take wet any day.

Arlingtonrider
10-14-2011, 04:15 PM
That sort of thing does seem to be happening more often, and is a good incentive for developing a rainy day kit. This has been a great thread. Thanks to all for the many good ideas.

dbb
10-14-2011, 04:56 PM
Or maybe . . . even . . . (dare I say it) . . . the bus or metro. (just so we can appreciate the suffering of others, of course! ;-).

Now that I have been riding for a couple of years, I have learned to dread the one day a month I have to ride the Metro. I'm pretty sure I can still imagine how they are suffering, I don't need retraining.

I'll take wet or cold any day. Gives me a chance to leave the backpack with the laptop in the office.

KS1G
10-14-2011, 08:52 PM
This is more of a deal with cold than deal with wet solution, but layers, layers, layers. Make sure the top one is windproof. Even a lightweight one will add a noticeable amount of warmth to whatever else you are wearing. For a budget, Target's Champion line is a lower price knockoff of Underarmour, Nike, and similar. Watch for sales. I keep an extra pair of gloves at work in case the ones I wear in the AM are still wet 8-9 hrs later (I can scrounge only so much newspaper from colleagues). I seem to have had better luck than Dirt does with Sealskinz waterproof socks, and my lightweight/packable endura jacket seems to have reached the end of it's life after several seasons of use. We'll see if the heavier one I got last year does better than Dirt's experience. Like D said - fenders rock.

Once the rain intensity and ride duration get big enough, you are simply going to get wet. But the drivers will give you a wider berth, as you are obviously crazy and might be dangerous.

FFX_Hinterlands
10-15-2011, 07:50 AM
Has anyone ever used a rain cape? It seems to make sense because it's more ventilated and keeps the rain from running down your jacket onto your crotch.
http://www.bicycleclothing.com/Rain-Capes.html

Personally I have an e-Vent running jacket (REI Brand) that works very well. It has breathable stretchy panels under the arms. It's breathable enough to wear as a windbreaker on cold winter days. I have rain pants and waterproof low hiking boots as well.
I'm riding an upright 3 speed with platform pedals, which is a rare combination in these forums, I think.

Greenbelt
10-15-2011, 08:01 AM
I'm riding an upright 3 speed with platform pedals, which is a rare combination in these forums, I think.

When it's really cold, I ditch the road shoes and wear lightweight thermal hiking boots! They have a tread pattern that sort of fits pretty snug in my pedals anyway, and the leg reach is about the same, so no need for sizing adjustments. Easier to put a foot down if it's slippery too.

vvill
10-15-2011, 08:30 AM
I'm still figuring out all the rain gear stuff. I've commuted to work 4+ days/week for the last month or so and still haven't found a great solution. I have learned that I don't mind getting wet, and that I REALLY need a rear fender. Also discovered my $30 ebay rain jacket works great at being a two-way water barrier... after 10 mins I'm pretty sweaty inside.

I need to remember to bring some spare gloves/shirts/etc to work. Right now I have a set of dirty sweaty bike gear hanging in my cube over the weekend. I just wore my Friday casual clothes for the return trip since it wasn't raining when I left yesterday.

I'm curious about the deep winter commute here, when there's snow and/or ice out there. Obviously go with studded tires, but when you put a foot down, doesn't your shoe slip? I have enough trouble walking on ice, I can't imagine putting a foot down at a red light/crossing while on my bike...

dbb
10-15-2011, 09:04 AM
Winter is generally pretty straightforward. Absent the infrequent big storms, snow generally isn't a problem. It is just cold. Most of the days the trails are clear. I rode through the winter last year with regular 28 mm tires on my hybrid and after one snow storm was forced to walk the bike along the MVT to the District (where the paths were clear and dry!) I was forced to metro a couple of days as well.

I bought a beater (old Peugeot with 1.95 tires) from the coop in Alexandria for the handful of days where the hybrid needs to stay in the barn.

Based on my relatively short 5 miles commute along the MVT into DC, I would say studded tires would probably be less value than appropriate clothing.

Plan on finding small patches of ice so your most valuable tools will be common sense (I'm screwed!), appropriate clothing and good lights.

The good news about winter biking is less trail crowding.

eminva
10-15-2011, 09:53 AM
Last year's discussion of studded tires:

http://bikearlingtonforum.com/showthread.php?317-It-s-too-icy-to-ride....-Or-is-it

Discussion of Socks & Boots:

http://bikearlingtonforum.com/showthread.php?309-Feet-Part-2-The-wonderful-world-of-socks.&highlight=lake+boots

More on Boots:

http://bikearlingtonforum.com/showthread.php?308-Hands-warm-How-bout-those-feets&highlight=lake+boots

There's more; you can do a search through the comments for specifics. But from these threads, it looks like some of those cycling specific boots have a tread pattern that would make it safer to drop your foot in ice/snow/etc.

I have pedals that are SPD on one side and flat on the reverse. I just wear general purpose fleece lined boots when it gets too cold for cycling shoes.

As far as winter wardrobe, I am a big fan of a wool base layer. I have ski sweaters in various weights. Depending on the temperature, I add maybe a vest and a wind blocking layer. Add wind stopper pants and it's passably cozy.

Am planning to put studded tires on my mountain bike this season so I can increase my winter commuting. Last year, I was fine with the cold, but any ice on the trail sidelined me because I was riding a road bike. It takes a surprising amount of time for all that ice to clear -- sometimes two or three weeks post storm.

Liz

Greenbelt
10-15-2011, 10:24 AM
I've found that CX tires with a little air pressure taken out work OK in an inch of snow or less on the trails. More that than, the old mountain bike comes out. After a while the snow gets packed down into ice by walkers and melt/refreeze cycles, but that's only in a few particularly shady spots and, while annoyingly bumpy even on the MTB, not intolerable over short stretches. The uneven footprints provide some traction. Would be nice if MNPPC would plow the trails with one of those mini-plows before it becomes a glacier.

5555624
10-15-2011, 03:55 PM
As far as shoes go, for snow and ice, I switch to Lake MX 165 MTB shoes. I have a wide foot, so I normally wear Lake MTB shoes anyway, but the tread on the 165 is a bit more pronounced and is fine in snow. I've thought about adding Yak Trax for ice, but haven't done it yet.421

americancyclo
10-17-2011, 08:30 AM
Nope. That is the wind jacket. It is great, but not the rain jacket. They are very different.

It would appear that the deal I got was a spectacular one. This is the jacket that I got for $120. http://www.pearlizumi.com/publish/content/pi_2010/us/en/index/products/men/ride/apparel/6.-productCode-6531.html MSRP is $200. [/url]

Looks like Amazon has the Elite Barrier WxB that Dirt linked to in Black (M, XXL only) for $132
http://www.amazon.com/Pearl-iZUMi-Barrier-Cycling-Jacket/dp/B00280MZQW/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1318857943&sr=8-13

jrenaut
10-17-2011, 09:08 AM
Looks like Amazon has the Elite Barrier WxB that Dirt linked to in Black (M, XXL only) for $132
http://www.amazon.com/Pearl-iZUMi-Barrier-Cycling-Jacket/dp/B00280MZQW/ref=sr_1_13?ie=UTF8&qid=1318857943&sr=8-13
I don't think I can fit a medium, so I guess I'd better get started on gaining 75 pounds.

I just dropped my bike off to get the fenders put on. The job was just a little bit beyond me. Nothing seemed to quite fit right, so I'm leaving it to the professionals.

And I'm thinking about buying myself a rain jacket as a One Year Bike Commuting Anniversary Present (Next Tuesday will be a year).

americancyclo
10-17-2011, 10:22 AM
Gloves: Nothing is going to keep your hands dry in a real rain. Moose Mitts and Bar Mitts are good when it is cold. Even they tend to send rain down your arms into your gloves and onto your hands. Do not despair!!!! Our scuba diving brethren and sistren have the answer. Castelli makes a glove called the Diluvio (Google will find them) that are made of neoprene. Your hands still get wet, but they stay warm. The palms are kinda weird, but they grip the bars really well. Trust me, these things rock. Warm and wet is better than Cold and wet any day... especially when Warm and dry isn't an option.
Pete

Anyone (Pete?) had any experience with Glacier Gloves, specifically the Perfect Curve? I've heard some good things, but never seen them up close. I need to figure out if I want to remove them from my Amazon wish list before folks start holiday shopping.

http://www.glacieroutdoor.com/store/index.cfm?fuseaction=category.display&category_ID=14

Dirt
10-17-2011, 10:36 AM
Anyone (Pete?) had any experience with Glacier Gloves, specifically the Perfect Curve?
I'm not familiar with them at all. Sorry.

PrintError
10-17-2011, 01:56 PM
For warm (above 60) conditions, including Thursday's ubermonsoon (hopefully I was the only one out riding in that!!!), I just wear my usual short sleeves and shorts. I'm waterproof. I packed my gloves so they stayed dry and rode in bare feet (which kinda sucks on SPDs) because wet shoes... yeah hell no. HATE THAT!!!

Might be because I've been surfing my whole life, but I couldn't care less about getting really wet. That said, I do rock a MTB trail fender on the back of my roadie on wet days. :-)

As for winter, my Specialized jacket got me home in February's snowstorm with a dry shirt (damp from sweat) after 18+ miles and snow ranging from 4" (work) to 10" (home) and a total whiteout for most of the ride. As for winter boots, it's Lake all the way!

Oh, and for snow/ice, I park the commuter and drag out my specially built MTB/ice bike. Innova Tundrawolf studded tires all the way!

Greenbelt
10-17-2011, 02:03 PM
I just dropped my bike off to get the fenders put on. The job was just a little bit beyond me. Nothing seemed to quite fit right, so I'm leaving it to the professionals.


Same here -- commuter bike's in the shop this week getting a new bottom bracket and fenders installed.

jrenaut
10-17-2011, 03:08 PM
Unfortunately, my fenders didn't fit, so the bike shop is ordering another set. They should be here Thursday, but probably not in time to show them off at Happy Hour.

Dirt
10-11-2013, 08:04 PM
I thought I'd dig up this thread again. It has some great information in it. Spending 8 or 9 hours riding in the rain over the last 2 days also brought up the topic in some of my rides.

KayakCyndi's new Endura Luminite jacket is AWESOME! The Luminite II is also pretty impressive. Endura really does things right. The visibility is great. So is the price. They can be had for under $150. I love that they do women's and men's sizing!!!

For those of us who sweat a lot and need more venting, we need to go up in the price range a bit. The Endura Stealth II adds pit zipps. The Flyte has ventilation panels that work pretty dang well, while still keeping the rain out. The Endura Venturi II jacket has been my favorite!

I wish all of the Endura jackets came in HiVis colors. Their reflective panels and piping on jackets work great, but the HiVis is nice in Daytime low light when people may not have their lights on.

The Endura Venturi 3/4 (knickers) are still the most amazing pants I've ever used. Amazing that they are between $140 and 200 depending on where you get them and size availability.

I'll have a report on the Giro New Road rain jacket in the next week or so.

Have fun out there. Be safe.

eminva
01-11-2014, 09:53 AM
Yesterday's commute exposed a few shortcomings in my rainy weather wardrobe. Does anyone have a recommendation for women's rain pants? Endura doesn't seem to feature women's pants. Showers Pass has several models; any recommendations there?

Also, what can I do to keep rain from seeping into my Northwave Arctic boots? Even allowing a lot of water in, they did keep my feet warm, but they didn't dry out by the end of the day. A google search suggested cutting the cuffs off of rubber kitchen gloves and sealing that around the top. I was dubious; anyone try that?

Thanks!

Liz

TwoWheelsDC
01-11-2014, 11:03 AM
Yesterday's commute exposed a few shortcomings in my rainy weather wardrobe. Does anyone have a recommendation for women's rain pants? Endura doesn't seem to feature women's pants. Showers Pass has several models; any recommendations there?

Also, what can I do to keep rain from seeping into my Northwave Arctic boots? Even allowing a lot of water in, they did keep my feet warm, but they didn't dry out by the end of the day. A google search suggested cutting the cuffs off of rubber kitchen gloves and sealing that around the top. I was dubious; anyone try that?

Thanks!

Liz

My Showers Pass pants velcro down at the bottom and fit tight over the tops of my shoes (Sidi Diablos), so no water seeps in the top. They don't breathe well (they are rain pants, after all), but they are comfortable otherwise and are indeed waterproof.

Arlingtonrider
01-11-2014, 11:10 AM
I have Novara Stratos rainpants (REI) that work well. They're loose fitting and meant to be worn over something (long johns, tights?). My legs stayed stayed dry and comfortable even in pouring rain this morning.

I was disappointed, though, to come home with wet feet (toe area), despite wearing rain covers over my shoes. I don't think that had anything to do with the rain pants. It probably came in from the shoe covers. It was pretty wet out there.

Amalitza
01-11-2014, 11:43 AM
Also, what can I do to keep rain from seeping into my Northwave Arctic boots?
Liz


My Showers Pass pants velcro down at the bottom and fit tight over the tops of my shoes (Sidi Diablos), so no water seeps in the top. They don't breathe well (they are rain pants, after all), but they are comfortable otherwise and are indeed waterproof.

My Novarra rain pants also velcro at the bottom and fit over the top of my Northwave boots, and keep the water out of my shoes just fine. They are not really very waterproof, though. So I recommend longer rain pants (or shorter legs), but not the same rain pants I have.:)

sjclaeys
01-11-2014, 12:50 PM
I have Novara Stratos rainpants (REI) that work well. They're loose fitting and meant to be worn over something (long johns, tights?). My legs stayed stayed dry and comfortable even in pouring rain this morning.

I was disappointed though to come home with wet feet, despite wearing rain covers over my shoes.

My Novara rain pants worked really well yesterday and ok today.

dkel
01-11-2014, 04:27 PM
My Novara rain pants worked really well yesterday and ok today.

My Novara rain pants have been great for four months, but I came home yesterday with a wet seat, because the waterproof lining has started to peel away, probably from friction around the saddle. I'm making a trip to REI Monday to ask them about it. If they replace them (which they probably will) I'll still be very happy with them. Anyone know how to reduce friction on that lining?

Rod Smith
01-11-2014, 05:40 PM
The waterproof laminate on my month old Novara rain pants is worn out at the crotch. :(

Vicegrip
01-11-2014, 07:39 PM
The waterproof laminate on my month old Novara rain pants is worn out at the crotch. :(Rain chaps?

Phatboing
01-11-2014, 07:42 PM
If you're a cheapskate like me, the Frogg Toggs Ultra-lite is an option: http://www.froggtoggs.com/mens/mens-jackets-all-weather/the-frogg-toggsr-ultra-lite2tm.html

I recently got myself one of these, and while I haven't yet tried them in a torrential downpour, they seem quite promising based on the few rain rides I've been in. The jacket's essentially a tailored plastic bag - it seals you in pretty well. Keep away from errant corners, though - I managed to poke a hole in mine when it snagged on a shelf.

dkel
01-13-2014, 07:56 PM
My Novara rain pants have been great for four months, but I came home yesterday with a wet seat, because the waterproof lining has started to peel away, probably from friction around the saddle. I'm making a trip to REI Monday to ask them about it. If they replace them (which they probably will) I'll still be very happy with them.

Thought I'd update this. I went to REI today to exchange my faulty Novara rain pants, and ended up upgrading from the Express version to the Stratos version. The more expensive Stratos seems more substantial, with a better integrated waterproof lining (which, I hope, will wear better). We'll see. Still love REI.

eminva
02-15-2014, 09:49 AM
Yesterday's commute exposed a few shortcomings in my rainy weather wardrobe. Does anyone have a recommendation for women's rain pants? Endura doesn't seem to feature women's pants. Showers Pass has several models; any recommendations there?

Also, what can I do to keep rain from seeping into my Northwave Arctic boots? Even allowing a lot of water in, they did keep my feet warm, but they didn't dry out by the end of the day. A google search suggested cutting the cuffs off of rubber kitchen gloves and sealing that around the top. I was dubious; anyone try that?

Thanks!

Liz

Thought I'd give a report on my findings now that I have given my new rain pants an inaugural run.

I ordered both Showers Pass Club Convertible 2 (http://www.rei.com/product/838583/showers-pass-club-convertible-2-bike-pants-womens) pants and Novara Stratos 2.0 (http://www.rei.com/product/853898/novara-stratos-20-bike-pants-womens) pants (when I ordered, they had both the full range of sizes and a higher price tag). I tried them both on and it was close, but absent the crucial real world test, I gave the edge to the Showers Pass. Pluses for the Showers Pass pants: they had a real waist band with a zipper (=> better fit and less extra bulky fabric overall), articulated knees and the fabric seemed slightly more substantial. Pluses for the Novara pants: the reflective parts seemed better thought out and I liked the closure at the ankle better. The length was good for both (I am 5'5").

This morning I went for a 45 minute ride in the sleet in my new Showers Pass pants and they were great! The ankle closure is growing on me -- I cinched them over my boots and no water got in to the boots. The ultimate test will be the full commute in a torrential downpour, but so far, so good.

By the way, there were plenty of women's Novara Stratos 2.0 on the shelves at the Tysons REI last weekend in a full range of sizes so if they've been similarly marked down, those would be a great bargain for someone. As I say, it was very close and I suspect I would have been satisfied with those.

Liz

Addendum: I meant to add that they are sized to allow you to wear something underneath -- bike shorts, tights, long johns, whatever your preference. I wore tights this morning and was both warm and dry.

Rod Smith
02-15-2014, 11:24 AM
I had same problem with the Express pants. I'll return, try the Stratos. :)

dasgeh
05-28-2014, 01:21 PM
I went looking for another cheap rain cape to order, and happened upon this one on Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/Cycling-Bicycle-Unisex-Raincoat-Windbreaker/dp/B00GAULWJW/ref=sr_1_17?ie=UTF8&qid=1401300985&sr=8-17&keywords=rain+cape).

Anyone care to explain the description?



Soft,comfortable to wear;
Collar band of zipper bag edge can avoid contact with skin zipper produced don't adapt to the feeling;
With polyester as the main material, Different appearance of perspiration air speed dry bacteriostatic tired work
Prevent Wind, sand and rain, keep you warm!
Size: one size fit all

jrenaut
05-28-2014, 01:25 PM
Anyone care to explain the description?
Almost definitely a machine translation. Maybe from Mandarin?

I really strongly prefer zippers that DO adapt to the feeling, but maybe that's just me.

sjclaeys
05-28-2014, 03:45 PM
How water resistant is the Crystal City BID windbreakers? Thanks