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jrenaut
08-31-2011, 07:54 AM
A week and a half into preschool, and my wife and I are about done with taking our daughter to school on the bus during rush hour. I want to carry her on my bike. She's a very tall 3 years old, and I'd also want to sometimes carry a tall 1 year old, too.

Does anyone have experience/advice with bike child carriers? I'm open to any style of carrier that will work, but if you've seen how I have to store my bike (http://bikearlingtonforum.com/showthread.php?602-Ceiling-bike-rack), you probably realize that I do not have a lot of space to work with.

Tim Kelley
08-31-2011, 08:00 AM
I have a Topeak MTX rack (http://www.topeak.com/products/Racks/ExplorerTubularRack_discMount) with the matching Babyseat II (http://www.topeak.com/products/Child-Carrier/tpk_babyseat) that I can swap out for the Trolleytote system (http://www.topeak.com/products/baskets/TrolleyTote) when going grocery shopping. I love it!

My daughter is only 10 months old but is in the 90% for height and has plenty of room to grow into it. I should be able to use the child carrier for at least another two or three years. It's rated to hold a weight of up to 48.5 lbs.

Revolution Cycles had a few in stock last time I checked. Something worth looking at!

jrenaut
08-31-2011, 08:05 AM
The grocery basket is nice. I'm currently 100% backpack, but that has its drawbacks, like biking 6 miles, mostly uphill, with a watermelon and a cantaloupe wedged in your back.

Tim Kelley
08-31-2011, 08:17 AM
Betweem the tote and a backpack, I carried $120 worth of groceries home last night. And I wasn't even shopping at Whole Paycheck!!

mstone
09-01-2011, 10:03 AM
Remember to also check the bike's weight rating for racks...

jrenaut
09-01-2011, 10:12 AM
Remember to also check the bike's weight rating for racks...
How do I do that? It's a Giant Defy 3 (http://www.giant-bicycles.com/en-us/bikes/model/defy.3/7307/44049/), and it doesn't list any rack weight rating on their website.

mstone
09-01-2011, 11:04 AM
That's a good question. Best bet would be a paper manual or something that came with the bike. In my experience, most bike companies are morons about actually posting that stuff on the internet, I don't know why. To some degree it depends on your own weight, and in the absence of any actual documentation from the manufacturer you can guess that the bike is probably designed for a total weight (rider+rack+etc) somewhere around 200-250lbs. Adding weight on the rack is different than adding weight on the rider, though, because it's distributed entirely on the rear wheel. If the kid is small it won't matter, but as the weight goes up you'll want to watch the bumps, especially on a 700x25 road bike.

jrenaut
09-01-2011, 11:11 AM
I didn't get a paper manual. Maybe I can get a hold of someone at Giant. Rider + rack + carrier + child + laptop + whatever else I need to bring to work are going to get close to 250.

Maybe I'll just have to tell my daughter that bumps build character.

Tim Kelley
09-01-2011, 11:14 AM
I've gotten close to 300lbs (rider included) on my bike (http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/mountain/dual_sport/ds_series/utopia/). But its a bit more beefy than your road bike.

DaveK
09-01-2011, 11:48 AM
I didn't get a paper manual. Maybe I can get a hold of someone at Giant. Rider + rack + carrier + child + laptop + whatever else I need to bring to work are going to get close to 250.

Maybe I'll just have to tell my daughter that bumps build character.

Plenty of 250-lb guys ride road bikes, you should be fine. Also consider that you won't be hopping curbs and whatnot with your child on the bike. The only weight limit I'd make sure to check is the rack itself.

jrenaut
09-01-2011, 12:28 PM
Plenty of 250-lb guys ride road bikes, you should be fine. Also consider that you won't be hopping curbs and whatnot with your child on the bike. The only weight limit I'd make sure to check is the rack itself.
Yeah, that makes sense. I think I'm going to try to get to a bike shop this weekend and take a look in person.

Thanks for all the advice.

ponchera
09-03-2011, 07:01 PM
I was looking for a thread discussing trailers but couldn't find one. Any thoughts on those? I want to buy one to fit my 1 year old and maybe a buddy of hers now and then.

I've read up on everything from the cheap instep to the "cadillac" models burley/chariot that run dor 500-600. I really don't want to spend that much and was wondering what are the specific "gotchas" of buying the cheaper ones assuming they check out with all the safety features. I see that some can function as strollers and cross country skiing etc etc. I really don't care for any of that, i just need to attach it to the bike.

I just want it to be safe, carry kids and a bag with their stuff, and collapsible so I can cram it somewhere in my condo or downstairs bike racks. Preferably not look to fugs but thats flexible. I've seen that the Insteps are popular on Craigslist but they qualify as either fugs or look a bit flimsy and outdated. LBS haven't been helpful, they don't have them on display. i've only seen them in REI which carries the cadillac models.

thoughts? what are the newbie mistakes when purchasing the cheaper stuff?

eminva
09-05-2011, 09:24 AM
I'm sorry, I never had a trailer so I can't answer your question. I have had good experience with Burley products, though. I realize the OP has space limitations, but his kids are getting older so he might want to consider a Burley Piccolo soon, if not now. I believe they have been discontinued, so you would have to search Craig's List. They are solid and well made so used is fine (We bought ours on Craig's List for $150 and sold it the same way when he outgrew it). I took my son to school, dropped off him and the trailercycle, and continued on to work solo. I would pick up the Piccolo at school in the evening (my husband had already picked up my son by then). It can also be used on a trail if you also mountain bike. The Piccolo differs from other trailercycles because it attaches to a "Moose Rack" to which you can affix panniers, rather than the seat post. If I understand it, this is more stable and helps the child learn the balance he or she will need to transition to a bicycle of his or her own. They also have gears so your kid can get the hang of that.

We had lots of fun with that and rode all over the place, including the city, where we lived at the time.

There's also the Big Dummy with child seat approach -- I've seen pictures on the internet with three kids on board!

Liz

americancyclo
09-05-2011, 10:16 AM
I've read up on everything from the cheap instep to the "cadillac" models burley/chariot that run dor 500-600.

you can find the nice models on CL for under $200. A friend of our just picked up a burley that converts in to a stroller that was 2 yrs old but in "like new" condition for $150. Personally, I'd go that route rather than paying full retail for a lower end product.

Ryan Ron
06-23-2012, 08:23 AM
What are some good and affordable baby Carriers (http://www.oneclicktoys.com/) out there for a newborn?
Many Thanks!

Tim Kelley
06-23-2012, 09:41 AM
Ryan--are you looking for a seat on the bike or a trailer? The trailers sometimes have inserts for newborns. The biggest issue I found was getting a helmet to fit my daughter--she was probably about 6 months before it fit.

You could always get a bakfiet and just put a normal car seat carrier in the cargo space!

RESTONTODC
06-23-2012, 10:39 AM
I use the cheap Instep trailer from Target to haul the big beer cooler around. It's sturdy but heavy. Like Tim said, you can put a normal baby car seat in it. It has two shoulder belts.

http://www.target.com/p/instep-presto-bicycle-trailer/-/A-12325109#?lnk=sc_qi_detaillink

MCL1981
06-23-2012, 09:50 PM
I feel like I would rather use a trailer. If the bike falls down, the trailer stays up. I would be worried about having the kid on a front or back seat. If I crash, I don't want the kid being plastered along the pavement when the bike hits the ground. I would think the trailer would stay upright. Even if it tips over, it will be much less violent than smashing into the ground from a falling bike.

Bilsko
07-18-2012, 01:07 PM
Bumping this thread to see if there are any updates. I'm looking for a trailer and have been thinking about the Burley options. Our daughter is 15mo old and I'd like to be able to take her around town in the trailer. From what I see Burley mainly focuses on the 2-kid trailers, with limited options for a single seater.
The other option is the rear-mount style Babyseat, but I'm leaning towards the trailer.

As for kid's helmets - does anyone have any recommendations one way or the other. It looks like the options from Bell and Giro are the best picks - any others?

Mikey
07-18-2012, 01:24 PM
My wife and I have used the chariot and loved it. Yes it is more expensive but can also be used as a jogging stroller so if you plan to use it as such you can "share" some of the cost. If you can get one on Craigslist, get it, the ride is by far the smoothest and safest. Because of the sturdy roll cage and 5 point harness, we didn't even put helmets on the kids inside which allowed them to sleep easier, and fit two good size toddlers inside. Last September on the CCT (just below the boat house) I flipped our chariot with 2 kids inside when it's right wheel caught a dowed tree limb too close to the trail. I didn't fall down but the kids inside were just a little shaken up, no bruises or scrapes. They even got back in to ride the rest of the way to Lockhouse 6. In any other trailer I think we would have needed a ride to the hospital.

Bilsko
07-18-2012, 02:09 PM
My wife and I have used the chariot and loved it. Yes it is more expensive but can also be used as a jogging stroller so if you plan to use it as such you can "share" some of the cost. If you can get one on Craigslist, get it, the ride is by far the smoothest and safest. Because of the sturdy roll cage and 5 point harness, we didn't even put helmets on the kids inside which allowed them to sleep easier, and fit two good size toddlers inside. Last September on the CCT (just below the boat house) I flipped our chariot with 2 kids inside when it's right wheel caught a dowed tree limb too close to the trail. I didn't fall down but the kids inside were just a little shaken up, no bruises or scrapes. They even got back in to ride the rest of the way to Lockhouse 6. In any other trailer I think we would have needed a ride to the hospital.

Did not know about Chariot until now - thanks for pointing to them. Do you recall which model it was that you used? It looks like there's quite a range of options (even for those of us who will only need a single-child carrier)

Tim Kelley
07-18-2012, 02:17 PM
+1 for Chariot. We're very happy with ours.

The only small drawback I've had it when I've taken it out on group hill rides--when climbing or sprinting out of the saddle and really rocking the bike back and forth the "ball and socket" connection between trailer can be a little jerky and the stroller will buck forward and back a little bit. A smoother power transfer like during a seated climb is just fine.

Riding the local paths at a moderate pace should be fine, and it's a great jogger as well. Also, lots of space for grocery shopping.

dasgeh
07-18-2012, 02:36 PM
The other option is the rear-mount style Babyseat, but I'm leaning towards the trailer.

Ah, but there are other options! We LOVE out BoBike Mini, which is a front bike seat. Our now 21-month-old has been in it since 9 months, and she LOVES it too. It's easy to use, and it's great to have her right between our arms, where we can talk to her and she can see what we see. She helps us signal turns. In fact, her first phrase was "right turn". Downsides: you can only use it with bikes that have more upright geometry; you can only get the BoBike Mini online (last I checked). I think REI has the iBert, but friends that have the iBert have consistently said the BoBike is better. You can get a windscreen for the BoBike, but you only need it in the winter (and it's AWESOME in the winter because it keeps you warm too!)

Once our toddler grows out of the front seat and #2 comes, we're considering other options. We've been looking at the Weehoo, and recently convinced some friends to buy one (yay, firsthand reviews). Our other option is a cargo bike, which is like having a trailer in the front of the bike. But that's a much bigger investment than you may be looking for.

Full disclosure: I've never been a fan of trailers, because the kid is far from you, and because the trailers are so low, I worry cars won't see them.

Mikey
07-18-2012, 03:23 PM
Did not know about Chariot until now - thanks for pointing to them. Do you recall which model it was that you used? It looks like there's quite a range of options (even for those of us who will only need a single-child carrier)

We have liked the cougar 2. Even if you are planning to only have 1 kid, get the double, much more storage. Now you can carry your kid and 3 bags of groceries. We actually have 2 of these (we wore out the first over 5 years and a nasty rat in our storage shed that ate through some of the shell/rubber components). We use the new one for the kids and the old one for gear. Get an extra rear adapter so that you and your spouse both have the ability to tow. This way when one of you is tired you can swap pretty easily. We like the standard (non-jogger) stroller wheels which stay attached to the chassis but are out of the way when towing, it makes the stroller very versatile.

vvill
07-18-2012, 03:33 PM
Just on child carriers in general, I've used both a chain-stay attached trailer (cheap Nashbar one) and a top-tube mounted one, the "WeeRide Kangaroo carrier" (http://www.weeride.com/Kangaroo-Center-Mounted-Child-Bicycle-Carrier) (WeeRide is an ok name if you're Scottish, otherwise it might as well be called "WhizzRide").

They both have their pros and cons, although I would say the trailer is definitely the less enjoyable to take around. Heavier, more time consuming to attach and detach, and the kid can't see that much out of it. Probably a bumpier ride for the kid too, being on smaller wheels and closer to the ground. A nicer trailer may alleviate some of those "cons".

I do agree there is a different sort of risk with the Kangaroo carrier being mounted directly on the bike (if you tip over for example), it's also easier to navigate and you don't have to worry about a car not seeing your trailer. The Kangaroo trailer gives your child has a great view of the ride and wind in their face, and they also feel very secure between your arms. The bolts on the bar of the Kangaroo do stick out sideways a bit and end up rubbing on the inside of my thighs which is annoying. By age 3 or 4 though it is too small so it's only for littlest kids.

GuyContinental
07-19-2012, 08:12 AM
+1 for Chariot. We're very happy with ours.

The only small drawback I've had it when I've taken it out on group hill rides--when climbing or sprinting out of the saddle and really rocking the bike back and forth the "ball and socket" connection between trailer can be a little jerky and the stroller will buck forward and back a little bit. A smoother power transfer like during a seated climb is just fine.


I went for a ride with a friend and his Chariot 2 this w/e and he had the identical complaint- lots of surging.

2-wheel trailers sketch me out a bit so I went with the WeeHoo iGo and iBert combo (way to much "i" marketing in this segment). Little dude (1) loves the iBert and the slightly larger dude really likes the open feel of the iGo (but pines for his iBert). The single wheel performs great on or off road but the whole set up (even with the new, lighter "pro" model) is ridiculously heavy (heavy enough that my w/e ride destroyed my BB). If I can get the older one to actually pedal (forward...) I have hopes that I won't have to bust 9000w to get up the Custis anymore. Time will tell and the little buggers are just going to get heavier.



1375

Bilsko
07-19-2012, 09:50 AM
I'm still processing all the great comments/advice - in the meantime, a friend and colleague sent me a link to this blog, written by a car-free couple with two kids in Cambridge, MA.
Custom setups for their bikes: a Dutch Cargo with a trailer-bike and an Xtracycle setup that looks like a custom tandem with 2 child-seats in place of the rear saddle.
Link: http://carfreecambridge.com/

Nuke
07-19-2012, 12:36 PM
We use a Co-Pilot child carrier

http://www.amazon.com/CoPilot-Taxi-Bicycle-Child-Seat/dp/B000G22QHW

It works pretty well but we are condsidering a trailer as this carrier is limited to 40lbs. Takes up a lot less space than a trailer.

For helmets, although there are probably many online, at toys r us there was only one that was designed for a todler made by Bell. Works fine.

Also, someone asked about newborns. Confirm with a pediatrician if you disagree, but infants should not be riding on a bike until at least they can hold there head up. One year plus seams to be the standard recommendation.

dasgeh
07-19-2012, 12:51 PM
Also, someone asked about newborns. Confirm with a pediatrician if you disagree, but infants should not be riding on a bike until at least they can hold there head up. One year plus seams to be the standard recommendation.

This is one of those things where you get different advice in different parts of the world. In the US, lots of peds will tell you 1 year minimum, but there's no reason for that. In Europe, most peds will say as long as the support is proper to the child, it's fine. For newborns, that pretty much means a car seat set into a cargo bike or trailer with proper restraints. Most bike seats, like high chairs, are fine once the kid can hold their heads and bodies upright (with helmet, of course). By 9 months, ours was more than comfortable in her seat.

GuyContinental
07-19-2012, 01:00 PM
Also, someone asked about newborns. Confirm with a pediatrician if you disagree, but infants should not be riding on a bike until at least they can hold there head up. One year plus seams to be the standard recommendation.

I had a trailer all rigged up with an automotive car seat but even so our pediatrician gave me an earful about the jostling combined with the head position resulting from the helmet. Despite the security of the seat and the roll cage on the trailer I wasn't willing for the guy to go helmet less... I backed down and stayed married. We started when he had clear and unambiguous neck control at about 14 months.

Yes, somehow indigenous people and our own ancestors survived strapped to backs and jostled all over the place but the infant mortality rate was awfully high.

vvill
07-19-2012, 01:37 PM
identical complaint- lots of surging.

I have that issue too with the trailer. The attachment is basically fixed straight to the chainstay, and if you've ever drafted close behind someone who starts to stand up and pedal out of the saddle you'll know that it means surging. It's not really a fault of the trailer per se, but I'm sure there are some designs which can damp the oscillations better.

For helmets, I also just got whatever was around at Toys R Us - Bell, I think.
I waited until almost 12 months (good neck control) before attempting either kid on the bike. Both my kids were 90+ %iles for height/weight when they were younger (my daughter is still big for her age), so a little before 12 months was okay.

Tim Kelley
07-19-2012, 01:55 PM
Most bike seats, like high chairs, are fine once the kid can hold their heads and bodies upright (with helmet, of course). By 9 months, ours was more than comfortable in her seat.

Our limiter was the size of her head. We had to wait until 7 months before it fit her and at that point, sitting and holding her head up was just fine.

Tim Kelley
08-06-2012, 09:32 AM
There was mention of this in the Missed Connection thread, but I wanted to stay on topic so I'm reviving this thread to post this question here:

I have a child seat that goes over the rear wheel. With a second baby on the way (eventually, that is--nothing yet folks, don't get excited!), I am curious about baby seats that are positioned up front so I could easily carry two kids at once. I am concerned about safety though--in the event of a crash while moving, or tipping over from a stationary position, there doesn't seem to be much in the way of protection.

Dasgeh, or anyone else with a front carrier, have you ever had a wipeout? I could imagine going over the handlebars and crushing the little one.

eminva
08-06-2012, 10:28 AM
There was mention of this in the Missed Connection thread, but I wanted to stay on topic so I'm reviving this thread to post this question here:

I have a child seat that goes over the rear wheel. With a second baby on the way (eventually, that is--nothing yet folks, don't get excited!), I am curious about baby seats that are positioned up front so I could easily carry two kids at once. I am concerned about safety though--in the event of a crash while moving, or tipping over from a stationary position, there doesn't seem to be much in the way of protection.

Dasgeh, or anyone else with a front carrier, have you ever had a wipeout? I could imagine going over the handlebars and crushing the little one.

My first advice is to space them out so the first one is on her own bike by the time the second one is ready to join you. Failing that, I think it's time for the cargo bike (http://www.xtracycle.com/family), Tim!

Liz

dasgeh
08-06-2012, 11:11 AM
There was mention of this in the Missed Connection thread, but I wanted to stay on topic so I'm reviving this thread to post this question here:

I have a child seat that goes over the rear wheel. With a second baby on the way (eventually, that is--nothing yet folks, don't get excited!), I am curious about baby seats that are positioned up front so I could easily carry two kids at once. I am concerned about safety though--in the event of a crash while moving, or tipping over from a stationary position, there doesn't seem to be much in the way of protection.

Dasgeh, or anyone else with a front carrier, have you ever had a wipeout? I could imagine going over the handlebars and crushing the little one.

Congrats, Tim! Welcome to the club.

We've never had a wipeout or crash of any type, probably because having the kid on the bike makes us super conservative cyclists. That said, I feel more secure with the little one up front than in the back -- We can see, hear and talk to her, and our arms are literally around her. We've never had a rear seat, but we have friends who have tried both, and we found internet posts of people who had tried both and overwhelmingly people preferred the front seat for smaller children.

Liz- we're considering a cargo bike (bakfiets version -- Xtracycle doesn't work for little ones), but are concerned about the gearing. We tried a Christiana when we were in London, but didn't love the trike thing. Otherwise, we're dying to find somewhere to test drive a bakfiets or similar around here. Please let us know if you have any leads.

Otherwise, we're thinking of getting the wee-hoo to go with the front seat -- by the time #2 will be able to do the BoBike Mini. #1 will be 3 months short of 3 yo. Luckily, our friends are getting a wee-hoo, so we'll be able to try it out.

KelOnWheels
08-06-2012, 11:27 AM
Otherwise, we're dying to find somewhere to test drive a bakfiets or similar around here. Please let us know if you have any leads.

Daily Rider (http://thedailyriderdc.com/)?

Tim Kelley
08-06-2012, 11:30 AM
Congrats, Tim! Welcome to the club.

We've never had a wipeout or crash of any type, probably because having the kid on the bike makes us super conservative cyclists. That said, I feel more secure with the little one up front than in the back -- We can see, hear and talk to her, and our arms are literally around her. We've never had a rear seat, but we have friends who have tried both, and we found internet posts of people who had tried both and overwhelmingly people preferred the front seat for smaller children.

Liz- we're considering a cargo bike (bakfiets version -- Xtracycle doesn't work for little ones), but are concerned about the gearing. We tried a Christiana when we were in London, but didn't love the trike thing. Otherwise, we're dying to find somewhere to test drive a bakfiets or similar around here. Please let us know if you have any leads.

Otherwise, we're thinking of getting the wee-hoo to go with the front seat -- by the time #2 will be able to do the BoBike Mini. #1 will be 3 months short of 3 yo. Luckily, our friends are getting a wee-hoo, so we'll be able to try it out.

Well like I said, it's more just thinking about the possibility now.

So it sounds like the seat up front is better suited for lower speed, recreational type rides where you can be super conservative. I seem to recall that your husband races--is he comfortable with it out in morning rush hour traffic? If you did have a crash it would be pretty disastrous right?

At what point do they outgrow the seat? What at what weight limit do you find it to be impractical?

vvill
08-06-2012, 11:40 AM
I have a child seat that goes over the rear wheel. With a second baby on the way (eventually, that is--nothing yet folks, don't get excited!), I am curious about baby seats that are positioned up front so I could easily carry two kids at once. I am concerned about safety though--in the event of a crash while moving, or tipping over from a stationary position, there doesn't seem to be much in the way of protection.

In terms of riding safely with babies/young kids, I've never really felt all that comfortable riding out beyond my neighborhood, or a park. I don't know that any of a trailer, rear/rack-mount seat, or front seat would handle crashes above a certain speed/severity that well. As with dasgeh, I ride very conservatively with a child.

I have the WeeRide, a seat that attaches to a bar that you install over the top tube. There's a piece of padded plastic in front of the child (around chest level) but it's mostly for them to hold onto/sleep on, I think. I chose it because it was inexpensive, but I do actually feel more comfortable with a kid in there than in my trailer because you are physically very close to them. I do feel like I have to be more careful mounting/dismounting though since with the seat + child the bike is much more top heavy than you're used to. Demo pic (https://sphotos-a.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/s720x720/390056_614568459911_1213818090_n.jpg) - you might notice I installed the stem and wide riser bars off my MTB on my hybrid to give me some extra room up front.

I have fallen off once with my son (then 3 y.o.), but it was just a tip over when we weren't moving, in the backyard, on a grassy surface.

dasgeh
08-06-2012, 11:45 AM
Does the daily rider have bakfiets? they don't say anything about them on their site?


So it sounds like the seat up front is better suited for lower speed, recreational type rides where you can be super conservative. I seem to recall that your husband races--is he comfortable with it out in morning rush hour traffic? If you did have a crash it would be pretty disastrous right?

At what point do they outgrow the seat? What at what weight limit do you find it to be impractical?

All seats come with use guidelines. Ours (which is from and accredited in the Netherlands) is made for:
For children from 9 months to 3 years
Suitable for children weighing from 9 to 15 kilos

Our friends with the iBert are still using for their 38 mo daughter, but are buying a wee-hoo because she's not really comfortable any more.

Both husband and I are very comfortable with her on our bikes -- we even got two brackets so we can easily switch the seat from my bike to his. I'm on an ebike and out in rush hour much more than him. <Not trying to be snarky> I'm not sure what other kind of riding you'd do with a little kid on a bike. Personally, I would be super conservative regardless with kid on bike. The studies from Europe (where there are a lot more front bike seats) seem to come out equal as far as front v rear bike seats in crashes. If you think about it, going over the handlebars is basically the same for the kid whether their in a front or rear seat (they're strapped in, so wheel/bars will hit, then them, if the bike goes over). Sideways falling is "safer" in the front bike seat in that you and the handlebars keep the kid from hitting the ground, but the seats themselves have less side protection (because of the fact that you and handlebars are there) than rear seats.

Trailers come out better in safety tests, but there's nothing in any study I've seen that adjusts for incidence of crashes. In other words, _when_ you crash, it's best for your kid to be in a trailer. I've never seen a study that says kids get hurt more or less overall in bike seats v. trailers, but anecdotally it seems there are a lot more crashes with trailers.

FFX_Hinterlands
08-06-2012, 12:16 PM
I'll just throw in my two cents. The type of bike does matter when carrying kids up high (iBert/Bobike or seat over the rear rack). Having something with forgiving geometry and step-through frame is going to be better for keeping balance when stopping/starting. By forgiving geometry and I mean a bike that is inherently stable with a load (Dutch bike, hybrid, etc). The big issue is that the perfect kid-toting bike won't be perfect for long. Kids grow up fast. My three kids are now all under their own power so it's more about corralling and leading then toting them around.

See the picture of the bike setup for the Torker Cargo T. Very common to what you might find in Europe.
http://www.joe-bike.com/accessories/child-seats-and-trainers/

KelOnWheels
08-06-2012, 12:53 PM
Does the daily rider have bakfiets? they don't say anything about them on their site?

If I remember correctly the guy who works there that came to Friday Coffee Club mentioned they had just gotten or were getting some in.

Tim Kelley
08-06-2012, 02:06 PM
Both husband and I are very comfortable with her on our bikes -- we even got two brackets so we can easily switch the seat from my bike to his. I'm on an ebike and out in rush hour much more than him. <Not trying to be snarky> I'm not sure what other kind of riding you'd do with a little kid on a bike. Personally, I would be super conservative regardless with kid on bike. The studies from Europe (where there are a lot more front bike seats) seem to come out equal as far as front v rear bike seats in crashes. If you think about it, going over the handlebars is basically the same for the kid whether their in a front or rear seat (they're strapped in, so wheel/bars will hit, then them, if the bike goes over). Sideways falling is "safer" in the front bike seat in that you and the handlebars keep the kid from hitting the ground, but the seats themselves have less side protection (because of the fact that you and handlebars are there) than rear seats.

I do most of my riding, utilizing the kids seat, in the bike lanes of Wilson and Fairfax and occasionally in traffic on a road like Glebe. I guess I should ask what you mean by super conservative--recreational rides on the WOD, or do you get out on the roads with any frequency or duration? I've got about a mile with her, and even in inclement weather she's generally okay.

Flipping over the handlebars is a non-issue because there is so much weight in the back already. Do you have to watch your front brakes with your front seat?

As for side safety, in a situation where you laid down the bike, does your setup keep her from hitting the ground? We've tipped over once, and with the way the seat wraps around her she was completely protected.

dasgeh
08-06-2012, 02:45 PM
I do most of my riding, utilizing the kids seat, in the bike lanes of Wilson and Fairfax and occasionally in traffic on a road like Glebe. I guess I should ask what you mean by super conservative--recreational rides on the WOD, or do you get out on the roads with any frequency or duration? I've got about a mile with her, and even in inclement weather she's generally okay.

Flipping over the handlebars is a non-issue because there is so much weight in the back already. Do you have to watch your front brakes with your front seat?

As for side safety, in a situation where you laid down the bike, does your setup keep her from hitting the ground? We've tipped over once, and with the way the seat wraps around her she was completely protected.

We ride mostly on roads, but very conservatively. E.g. when there's a car running in the parking lane beside the bike lane, we'll often pull into the traffic lane to be sure we don't get doored or pulled-out-into. When we pull up to intersections, even where we clearly have the right-of-way, we slow, look for cars turning right, etc. Where there's an alternative to a larger road, we take the smaller road (e.g. Key Blvd to get around Clarendon). Every once in a while we're on the Custis trail, but otherwise, we're on roads. We're on Quincy pretty much every day.

I've never had a front brake issue with the front seat. As FFX mentioned, type of bike is key. We have the front seat on dutch style bikes, which are super-stable anyway.

We've never laid down the bike with kid in the seat, but it has fallen with the seat on it, and the seat didn't touch the ground at all - the handlebars did. I think the only way the seat would hit before the handlebars would be if the butt of the seat hit first (i.e. if the handlebars were turned all the way away from the direction of the fall).

aflapr
08-07-2012, 08:41 AM
At what point do they outgrow the seat? What at what weight limit do you find it to be impractical?

We bought an iBert when our daughter was old enough to hold her head up. I like dasgeh' recommendation for the BoBike mini.
The iBert was very easy to install on my wife's Novara hyrbid and has held up well. Our daughter is just under the 40 lb weight limit and it is definitely time to move on to a larger capacity carrier.

I've done some bicycle touring/caming with a full load on the rear rack (paniers, sleeping bag, tent, etc) and I found that having our daughter up front was much more stable. My wife was less comfortable biking, but adjusted very quickly. Luckily, we had some time in Key West to adjust to traffic and there were no hills there. But even after moving here, my wife adjusted easily.

We did buy sunglasses for our daughter though for rides - not only for the sun, but for bugs, etc.

dasgeh
08-07-2012, 08:52 AM
The other cool thing about the BoBike Mini is there's a windscreen. In the winter, I sometimes put it on my bike even without the bike seat, because it's SO MUCH warmer.

Sunglasses are key without the windscreen (not worth using when it's hot -- the breeze is nice)

btj
08-10-2012, 10:17 PM
If I remember correctly the guy who works there that came to Friday Coffee Club mentioned they had just gotten or were getting some in.

They do! I went in earlier this week a test rode a Gazelle Cabby and a Larry vs Harry Bullitt (pictured). I really liked the Bullitt. The Gazelle however felt like I was driving a semi-truck.

http://pics.campl.us/f/c/c9e0d82c11260bc7355c163914676e7c-1369642230.jpg

dasgeh
08-20-2012, 03:18 PM
For anyone interested in coming out to Arlington, we're planning a family bike show-and-tell (stealing Kidical Mass DC's idea) to go along with the Arlington Fun Ride on October 6, 2012. Stay tuned...

eminva
08-20-2012, 03:22 PM
dasgeh, on Saturday I saw a family cycling by the central library in Arlington with a BAKFIETS! I'm so sorry I wasn't able to flag them down and ask about it, but it appears there is one in Arlington.

Liz

Tim Kelley
08-20-2012, 03:30 PM
dasgeh, on Saturday I saw a family cycling by the central library in Arlington with a BAKFIETS! I'm so sorry I wasn't able to flag them down and ask about it, but it appears there is one in Arlington.

Liz


Was it this guy?

1564

dasgeh
08-20-2012, 03:36 PM
dasgeh, on Saturday I saw a family cycling by the central library in Arlington with a BAKFIETS! I'm so sorry I wasn't able to flag them down and ask about it, but it appears there is one in Arlington.

Liz

I've met him! Unfortunately, it was only for a second, and I couldn't exchange info... But I did meet another Dutch mother at W&L pool who has another Bakfiets! I was so excited! I have her email and will be begging her to come to the show-and-tell. Best part: I met her because when she saw me (preggos and all) biking with my toddler in the BoBike Mini, she thought I was Dutch. I was flattered! (Almost as flattered as when I was living in Germany, and native Germans would guess that I was Dutch, based on my German-speaking abilities).

Tim Kelley
08-20-2012, 03:46 PM
I've met him! Unfortunately, it was only for a second, and I couldn't exchange info... But I did meet another Dutch mother at W&L pool who has another Bakfiets! I was so excited! I have her email and will be begging her to come to the show-and-tell. Best part: I met her because when she saw me (preggos and all) biking with my toddler in the BoBike Mini, she thought I was Dutch. I was flattered! (Almost as flattered as when I was living in Germany, and native Germans would guess that I was Dutch, based on my German-speaking abilities).

If it's the guy in the photo who you are looking for, I've got his contact info. Let me know and I'll email it to you.

dasgeh
08-20-2012, 03:54 PM
yes, please!

Bike Ahead
09-10-2012, 09:49 AM
There's this new Yepp Child Carriers out on the market which are great! They are sleek and stylish, and most of all comfy for your little rider. You can add some cool accessories to it, to boot. check it out here Yepp Child Carrier (http://www.bikeahead.com/Yepp_Maxi_Rear_Child_Seat_Blue_p/yep05434.htm?1=1&CartID=0).

thecyclingeconomist
10-02-2012, 01:06 PM
I've read up on everything from the cheap instep to the "cadillac" models burley/chariot that run dor 500-600. I really don't want to spend that much...

Buy used! The Cougar 2 is the best trailer on the market... period. We have a three year old and another on the way, and I know you said you wouldn't use the other options, but I bet you would if given the option. We have the stroller, bike, jogger, CX-ski, hiker adapters, and it's the most awesome thing ever. I've taken my daughter snowshoeing in Yosemite a bunch of times.

The stroller option is the best stroller I've used. Weather proof... and have been out cycling when it just dumped. She came out dry and snug.

I know that Burley has a good trailer, but the options on the Chariot and the suspension, durability just make it phenomenal. You can snag them used on craigslist or ebay for a significant discount. I also saw one at the recent "garage-sale" at REI down off of Braddock for $225.

I'll be selling my cougar 1 and making the swap to the cougar 2 over the next year.

Here's a video of snowshoe mode:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fkTKnrsSfQ4&feature=g-upl

Video of it in bike-mode (Skip to the last minute or so... realized that it's not all of the chariot in this clip):

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rtVYoJ8HwLw&feature=youtu.be

thecyclingeconomist
10-02-2012, 01:09 PM
Our limiter was the size of her head. We had to wait until 7 months before it fit her and at that point, sitting and holding her head up was just fine.

The nutcase was the only manufacturer that made one small enough for our daughter before age 1. I put a couple extra pieces of foam in to make sure it stayed in the correct position to protect my daughter's noggin. I tried 3 others before settling on the nutcase.

thecyclingeconomist
10-02-2012, 01:14 PM
I owned a chariot sidecar before moving to D.C.

It's a REALLY cool option to have your child where you can see them/point things out. However, it does make you as wide as a bicyclist and a half. On really heavily utilized bike-paths, I wouldn't go for it.

Video of the sidecar:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OrJHyISAjUg&feature=youtu.be

Bilsko
10-02-2012, 02:40 PM
I owned a chariot sidecar before moving to D.C.

It's a REALLY cool option to have your child where you can see them/point things out. However, it does make you as wide as a bicyclist and a half. On really heavily utilized bike-paths, I wouldn't go for it.



It looks like they don't make it anymore (at least not for the US market). That's unfortunate cause I'd totally consider swapping out my Chariot trailer for the sidecar.

jopamora
04-18-2013, 12:35 PM
Anyone have experience with this kid seat (http://www.tyketoter.com/)?

Tim is this another thread for the Family Biking Forum?

americancyclo
10-14-2014, 11:25 AM
Does anyone here have a front mounted child carrier that they no longer use?

I've got an old MTB that I use as the child carrier since it has plenty of gears and I don't mind it getting banged up. It's worked quite well with the trailer and now a trail-a-bike. We tried using an iBert when my daughter was smaller, and she loved being up front, but the installation bracket scraped up my top tube. My MTB stem isn't slammed, but there's not a lot of fork to properly elevate the seat high enough to keep it from scraping paint off my bike (not to mention making it difficult to handle.)

We've been given the opportunity to try cycling with a little one all over again, so before I went out to buy something, I hoped I might be able to try, borrow, or buy a seat off someone here that has one they loved, that they might no longer need.

Thanks!

ShawnoftheDread
10-14-2014, 11:48 AM
We've been given the opportunity to try cycling with a little one all over again, so before I went out to buy something, I hoped I might be able to try, borrow, or buy a seat off someone here that has one they loved, that they might no longer need.

Thanks!

Someone gave you a baby?!

dasgeh
10-14-2014, 12:07 PM
Someone gave you a baby?!

Someone has got to keep APS overcrowded.

vvill
10-14-2014, 12:14 PM
Does anyone here have a front mounted child carrier that they no longer use?

Yep. I have a WeeRide Kangaroo bought new that I used on either my MTB or hybrid - you're free to borrow it. It does scratch up the top tube but I really liked the front seat option. I ended up taping some old bar tape bits over the top tube and then remounting it.

Depending on your frame size, you may end up having to pedal knees out which is not ideal (less likely in your case though). The only other issue I had was that I felt the harness straps weren't particularly secure - it's fine for kids that are fairly stable themselves, but early on it seemed a little precarious. But it wasn't ever that bad, especially since your arms are basically around the child the whole time.

I would still prefer to ride with my daughter in this rather than the trailer but there's no way she'd fit now.

This is the model, I think the newer ones are sleeker with better harness (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001DF68MA/)

americancyclo
10-14-2014, 12:39 PM
Someone has got to keep APS overcrowded.
That someone ain't us! FFX all the way! (at least until we move)


Yep. I have a WeeRide Kangaroo bought new that I used on either my MTB or hybrid - you're free to borrow it.

Sweet. No rush, though. riding probably won't happen until fall of 2015 but I'll happily take you up on your offer to see how it fits on my bike.

I guess my other option is to get a new fork with a larger steerer tube and have more stack on my bars?