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View Full Version : Fitting clip-on aerobars onto bars with cables inside handlebarwrap



TDB
07-29-2011, 10:15 AM
Recently acquired a pair of profile design carbon stryke aerobars, before realizing that on my 2002 Cannondale r700 si, the brake cables hug the bars underneath the wrap, making it fairly impossible to fit the bars to clean handlebar. My initial reaction was great, not I have to partially unwrap the tape and have the cables come away from the handlebar to create an area the aerobars can grab onto. After doing some reading about ways you can screw up the routing of your cables, I am concerned this would potentially cause unwanted friction in the cables. Has anyone been in the same situation and acquired some helpful knowledge?

Greatly appreciated,
TDB

TDB
07-29-2011, 05:02 PM
For clarification, here are a couple images of the handlebars in question.

289

290

From what I've read, clamping the aerobars over bar and cable together is a no-no, even though it looks temptingly doable. Therefore I would think the solution would be to unwrap the handlebar wrap starting at the taped end near stem, unwrap a few inches, feed the cable out of the wrap away from the handlebar, then rewrap the few inches I had undone, retape.

Any advice on this topic would be greatly appreciated, as I do not wish to damage my cables / cause friction in the housing.

TDB

PotomacCyclist
07-30-2011, 02:17 PM
I vote no on clamping anything onto a brake/shifter cable.

My tri bike was already set up with aerobars. The cables are routed around the clamps for the aerobars. Those clamps have to be on fairly tight. I would think that if you put the clamp on top of the cables, that you might actually cut through the cables. That wouldn't be good.

TDB
07-30-2011, 02:33 PM
Yeah I got that far, now I'm just trying to determine if getting the cables out from underneath the bar wrap then rewrapping would end badly for my brake cables. I would have to unwrap a good couple inches worth so that the cables, once out of the bar wrap, would have a gentle slope away from the handlebars once the mounting system for the clip-ons is in place, so the cables don't get too abruptly bent to make room.

TDB

PotomacCyclist
07-31-2011, 07:46 PM
Besides the cable/bar wrap issue, if you're putting aerobars on a road bike, you may also need to get a forward-facing seat post. The geometry is different between a road bike and a tri bike. Road bikes are not designed to have your torso as far forward as you will need to be in aero position. The forward-facing seat post can take care of that problem.

Test out the new set-up. If you find that you have to stretch out too far to get your elbows on the pads and your hands on the aerobars, then you may want to get a new seat post.

TDB
08-01-2011, 08:23 AM
Thanks for that pointer, after doing some more research it sounds like being forward enough to achieve good aero position is more important than the knees-directly-above-ball-of-foot I'm used to. My plan so far is to get my buns in a couple tri's with this bike, see how well I enjoy it, and if i continue on with the sport (which so far seems incredibly likely, so very enjoyable and cathartic), invest in a tri specific bike. I must admit I've been looking at ads for Cervelo duals and QRs on craigslist and having to force myself to close the window.


TDB

CCrew
08-01-2011, 08:55 AM
FastForward seat post will fix the geometry issue pretty quickly. In Tri you're trying to protect the quads for the run in the bike position. On the bike you're also looking for as flat a back as possible for aero. (all tidbits picked up from a son that was USAT Team USA)

Based on the pictures I'd be unwrapping about two wraps off the bar tape to get some cable slack. If that doesn't work I'd look at recabling to get some clearance. I don't know how the Strykes mount, my Cobra's are pretty tight to the stem. Mine are on a BMC Tri bike though, so pictures won't help much as the cockpit is tri-specific.

Shame, I just dumped a QR at a giveaway price.

Keep in mind that on a road bike with clip-ons it's all a tradeoff. Unless you move your shifters out to the aerobars you're coming off them to shift anyway. Greatest gains to be had in the aero department is actually in a TT helmet.

TDB
08-01-2011, 09:23 AM
Yeah I'll be moving around to shift, but while still on an adjusted road bike and not a tri, I wont be worrying too much about shaving seconds.

As for the seatpost, would this be the post you referred to?

http://www.amazon.com/Profile-Design-fast-Forward-Seat/dp/B000MUK0J4

Wish I could find a local one to buy in-store, I do so hate ordering parts online.

TDB
08-01-2011, 09:26 AM
Actually there's one up on craigslist for a decent price, I just need to get home to determine my seatpost diameter.

http://washingtondc.craigslist.org/nva/bik/2522035680.html


TDB

Tim Kelley
08-01-2011, 09:32 AM
I wouldn't worry about getting a special seat post if you are just getting into triathlon. I've done many 100+ mile rides on a stock road bike with clip-on aerobars. And in races, I've passed plenty of people with time trial bikes, fancy wheels and helmets.

The most important thing is having a comfortable setup on which you can do plenty of training, because if you can't be comfortable in aero, then you won't develop your legs and cardio engine.

And practice your swimming and running.

CCrew
08-01-2011, 09:52 AM
And in races, I've passed plenty of people with time trial bikes, fancy wheels and helmets.



I'll turn my son loose on you and we'll see :-)

His bike split average is usually in the 27-30mph range. PR on a 40K TT is mid 54:00 I just wave goodbye :). Oh to be 19 again :)

Tim Kelley
08-01-2011, 10:02 AM
I'll turn my son loose on you and we'll see :-)

His bike split average is usually in the 27-30mph range. PR on a 40K TT is mid 54:00 I just wave goodbye :). Oh to be 19 again :)

And I'm sure he'd be almost as fast with a normal seat post and clip-ons...would love to see some power data from him sometime.

CCrew
08-01-2011, 11:21 AM
And I'm sure he'd be almost as fast with a normal seat post and clip-ons...would love to see some power data from him sometime.

Not really. For him it made a huge difference. Whether it was a placebo or not I can't say. He went from 1:05's on a road bike to 1:00's on a QR and set the 54: on my BMC in the 40k. Keep in mind that was pure TT
http://www.piranhaevents.com/Results/ResultsAll.aspx?RaceID=216

That link was done on a road bike. Lots of elevation on the course. You can see the MPH is much lower than some others I'm looking for now.

Edit: Forgot. He was 1st in that one

TDB
08-02-2011, 09:18 AM
Hey CC, any chance either you or your son could offer advice on tri bike brands or specific bikes? From what I've read it sounded like Cervelos are the cat's pajamas, from their lowest to highest end models. You mentioned riding on Quintana Roos, is that because you prefer them over others, or just found a good deal?

Thanks for your time.

TDB

CCrew
08-02-2011, 09:52 AM
Hey CC, any chance either you or your son could offer advice on tri bike brands or specific bikes? From what I've read it sounded like Cervelos are the cat's pajamas, from their lowest to highest end models. You mentioned riding on Quintana Roos, is that because you prefer them over others, or just found a good deal?

Thanks for your time.
TDB


He was riding a Roo because we picked one up pretty cheap on CL and that's what he started with. The BMC TT bike I lucked across a blowout of new frames, but still have about 4k tied up in the bike. There are a lot of good brands out there, it's just that Cervelo's are more visible in the market.

If you're just getting started don't rush out and buy a tri specific bike. The adage "It's all about the engine" ie: you is sound advice. A tri isn't won on the bike alone. Swim, transition (big item) and run are equally important.

My son did (he's lazy these days) well because he was a varsity swimmer, raised on a bike, and state level in track and cross country.

If you suck at the swim you can also chase duathalon which is run/bike/run.

I'd be at least placing in age group or close to it before making the investment personally. My son is an exception for how much difference the bike made, and to this day I still think it was a placebo.

Tim Kelley
08-02-2011, 10:06 AM
He was riding a Roo because we picked one up pretty cheap on CL and that's what he started with. The BMC TT bike I lucked across a blowout of new frames, but still have about 4k tied up in the bike. There are a lot of good brands out there, it's just that Cervelo's are more visible in the market.

If you're just getting started don't rush out and buy a tri specific bike. The adage "It's all about the engine" ie: you is sound advice. A tri isn't won on the bike alone. Swim, transition (big item) and run are equally important.

My son did (he's lazy these days) well because he was a varsity swimmer, raised on a bike, and state level in track and cross country.

If you suck at the swim you can also chase duathalon which is run/bike/run.

I'd be at least placing in age group or close to it before making the investment personally. My son is an exception for how much difference the bike made, and to this day I still think it was a placebo.

THIS. Exactly this. CCrew once again provides sound advice.

TDB
08-02-2011, 10:18 AM
Right on right on. I wont be making any purchases in the near future, I'm just obsessed with thoroughly researching all the options well in advance before relinquishing my grip on precious dollar bills.
While swimming is my weak point so far, I'd much rather spend hours in the water getting up to a level on par with my biking and running, than write the pool off and stick to the duathlons. Though they are good practice to compete in a few while working on swimmin.


TDB

CCrew
08-02-2011, 10:36 AM
Right on right on. I wont be making any purchases in the near future, I'm just obsessed with thoroughly researching all the options well in advance before relinquishing my grip on precious dollar bills.
While swimming is my weak point so far, I'd much rather spend hours in the water getting up to a level on par with my biking and running, than write the pool off and stick to the duathlons. Though they are good practice to compete in a few while working on swimmin.

TDB

Du's are great in the colder weather to keep in tune when the swim is pure polar bear material.

When you're ready to upgrade bikes look in the used market first. There are a lot of folks that go out and buy an expensive tri bike because they think they need it, and ride two races and they sit. Don't be stuck on brand. Seriously. Research fit and get a solid idea of what fits you before looking.

Don't underestimate the need to practice transitions either.. I've seen national level races lost there.

-R

TDB
08-02-2011, 10:39 AM
I'm actually an avid cold weather fan, and am now contemplating a polar bear plunge / triathlon collaboration. Sounds dangerous.

CCrew
08-02-2011, 11:11 AM
I'm actually an avid cold weather fan, and am now contemplating a polar bear plunge / triathlon collaboration. Sounds dangerous.

Yeah it does. You're a better man than I am! I'll ride year round, but you can keep the water away from me thanks much!

Tim Kelley
08-02-2011, 11:13 AM
Don't be stuck on brand. Seriously. Research fit and get a solid idea of what fits you before looking.

Excellent advice as well. I'd love to ride a Cervelo or a Trek Speed Concept, but even the sizing on an extra larger version of those is too small for me.

Go to multiple shops to try multiple brands. Between Contes, Revolution Cycles and Bonzai you have about 5 or 6 different brand choices.

americancyclo
08-02-2011, 11:49 AM
CycleLife also runs swim classes, and the first one is free. They've also got a fair amount of Tri stuff available. I think they even 'rent' wetsuits (maybe?)

http://cyclelifeusa.com/AthleteServices/Classes.aspx

Tim Kelley
08-02-2011, 12:03 PM
I think they even 'rent' wetsuits (maybe?)

Both Conte's and Bonzai rent wetsuits last time I checked.

PotomacCyclist
08-03-2011, 02:18 PM
I'm actually an avid cold weather fan, and am now contemplating a polar bear plunge / triathlon collaboration. Sounds dangerous.
A cyclocross race would be a better idea. At least for me. I hate swimming in cold water.

PotomacCyclist
08-03-2011, 02:20 PM
I wouldn't worry about getting a special seat post if you are just getting into triathlon. I've done many 100+ mile rides on a stock road bike with clip-on aerobars. And in races, I've passed plenty of people with time trial bikes, fancy wheels and helmets.

The most important thing is having a comfortable setup on which you can do plenty of training, because if you can't be comfortable in aero, then you won't develop your legs and cardio engine.

And practice your swimming and running.
The need for a forward-facing seat post will vary from person to person. For some people, it's a necessity. Without that post, they will strain just to reach the aerobars. For other people, they can get by without the special seat post.

TDB
08-03-2011, 04:54 PM
Yeah I'm learning just how subjective biking really is nowadays. I found a good deal on a profile design fastforward seatpost of correct diameter, and plan on buying and testing out the feel. I expect to feel unnaturally far forward at first, will need to go for a long ride to compare feel against stock seatpost.

TDB

CCrew
08-03-2011, 04:55 PM
Yeah I'm learning just how subjective biking really is nowadays.

It's an addiction. I can stop any time. Really I can.... :)